"We leggen een deken in het park."

Translation:We lay a blanket in the park.

1 year ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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English screams "Give me a preposition here!" We lay out, spread out, put down a blanket would be usual. "To lay a blanket" is pretty much unheard of. Now, laying a table - that's a different matter: but, of course, that means putting stuff on a table in preparation for a meal. Not putting a table down in the park - which, I imagine, would be We staan de tafel in het park.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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We zetten de tafel in het park.

"Staan" can never mean to put/place.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Hi Sean,

I'm sorry but I'm afraid I don't quite agree with you on this one.

For example, if you check the first meaning listed on the Cambridge dictionary's website: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/lay?q=Lay

you'll see that not only the meaning (to put something in especially a flat or horizontal position, usually carefully or for a particular purpose) but the fourth example as well go along the same lines as the sentence we have here.

Also, if you check the OED, you'll see that there is a slight difference in meaning between lay and lay out:

lay /leɪ  / ▸ verb (past and past participle laid /leɪd/) 1) [with object and adverbial of place] put (something) down gently or carefully

2) [with object] put down and set in position for use:

it is advisable to have your carpet laid by a professional.

lay something out

1) spread something out to its full extent:

the police were insisting that suitcases should be opened and their contents laid out.

her evening dress was laid out on the bed.

The only other meaning of lay+preposition that may be slightly similar is: lay something down 1) put something down.

The part where the origin of lay is discussed is quite interesting to us (since we are learning Dutch), look:

ORIGIN Old English lecgan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch leggen and German legen, and also to lie. The verb lay means, broadly, ‘put something down’, as in they are going to lay the carpet.

So, I don't think that a preposition is required here, even though I do believe that lay out should be accepted.

Hope this helps!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FamilyWats1

We lay out a blanket in the park is also a valid translation i think. Not accepted though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBush2
MattBush2
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Would this phrase be used to indicate laying on a blanket?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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You mean lying on a blanket?

No, this phrase only indicates placing the blanket in the park.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krimpet1
krimpet1
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If there was some unusual situation where you were placing a folded up blanket on a table in a park or someting like that, would you then use 'zetten' and the blanket then "staat" or "zit" in het park?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alan152883

Why does this say "leggen" and not "liggen"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Because "liggen" is a state of 'being' as in "it is on the floor" and "leggen" is the action of putting it on the floor.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alan152883

Ah, gotcha! Thank you :)

4 weeks ago
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