"Neexistujeme."

Translation:We do not exist.

1 year ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bookSeller8519

Well, that seems like a pretty bold claim!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lemniscatarum
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Existential crises.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kbdfi
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Is there a glottal stop between the two "e"s? I think I hear one in the audio, but I'm not sure.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fehrerdef
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yes, there is one

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
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dam how come there is x in a Czech word - -

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/folshost
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Cause it's a cognate. The -ovat ending is normal for verbs of foreign origin

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
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so you wanna say there was no native word for "to exist"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fehrerdef
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in very much the same way that there is no "native" word for it in English :-) It's a loan word in many European languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
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but in English it doesn't stand out as x is not an uncommon letter

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kacenka9
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Well, you can say "Me nejsme" (нас нет). = we are not. It does sound weird alone like this in English but in Czech it is possible to say standalone. And though there are no native Czech words containing X, exist has been used for so long and so extensively that it nearly gained the czech citizenship.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fehrerdef
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In German there are lots of (usually French) loan words that have a "c" as a single consonant in it, which does not happen in words of Germanic origin and therefore nis uncommon as well. And similar trhings happen in other languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/folshost
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Maybe not in the exact way we use it in English, unless there is one and all the English -> Czech dictionaries I can find aren't showing me everything. But if you would like, here's the wiktionary page for the verb "existovat", the etymology of which shows that exist comes from a latin root, not a slavic one. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/existovat

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgreenemi
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Is there a way for us to recognize when a word will have that short stop between two vowels beyond just rote memorization?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
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I believe Czech never uses double vowels (for example, ee) to indicate a single sound. Some languages use them to show a long vowel, but Czech would write é instead.

So I think that two vowels written together in Czech must always be separated by a glottal stop (short break).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fehrerdef
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you are right concerning identical vowels, but of cause there are combinations of different vowels that are not separated by a glottal stop. e.g. the eu in "museum", whereas "nealcoholický" has a glottal stop between the ne- and the rest of the word. The decisive criterion is the grammar: if the word is combined of different parts that come together exactly between the two vowels, then there is a glottal stop.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
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Thank you, that makes sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristophS49077

I don't know if that's a glottal stop but to me it sounds like czechs have a pause inbetween "euro" (e-uro)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoneheadBass
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In Czech, pretty much every letter is pronounced independently. So there's a tiny little break between the "e" and the "u" in the Czech pronunciation of "euro" that isn't there in English.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/endless_sleeper
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It should be pronounced as this diphthong actually: [eʊ̯] There's no pause.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/May1119
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Big Brother ❤❤❤❤, and now this. I shouldn't be on Duolingo along after midnight gettin a lil spooked

9 months ago
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