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  5. "사과 세 개와 귤 네 개"

"사과 개와 "

Translation:Three apples and four tangerines

September 8, 2017

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew667285

Never ever heard of a satsuma. Tangerine is the word to use here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasPrik

tangerines are accepted, so show both in the hints...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejcasey

Still not fixed 12/20/17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tontonzark

satsuma. Tangerine is a sort of mandarine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkSantol

What is a satsuma? I would have translated 귤 as tangerine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

Considering the fact that this is for English learners, satsuma is really confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiKomprenasVin

Eh, growing up near Seattle, we bought satsumas every winter. Where I'm at now, I can only find mandarins, which have a bit tighter skin vs the super loose skin of satsumas.

I actually didn't know what a mandarin or tangerine were until moving away and not having access to satsumas, so it really depends on where you're from in this case. Now that I live away from easy access to satsumas, I understand how confused others must be since they're nowhere to be found in local stores.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

What's really fun is that satsumas, tangerines, and clementines are all different varieties of mandarin orange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natespinheiro

What does that 개 stands for


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkSantol

It is the 'object counter' used when you want to count items. Basically it means things, but only in the context of counting. Some more info: http://keytokorean.com/classes/beginner/how-many-counting-stuff-in-korean/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swauger

This sentence structure confused me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Priam905041

agree. tangerine or mandarin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soccermom98

From Mango Languages

Counters:

장 (jang) after # for thin flat objects (maps or tickets)

명 (myeong) after # for counting people

개 (gae) after # for counting things

Hope this helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peter.cecu

Yeah even orange would be better than satsuma


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lakerbat

Apparently, this is a hotly debated issue elsewhere! Satsuma is a specific type of mandarin. Tangerine seems to be used exclusively in the US to describe this fruit. Mandarin seems to be generally used world-wide.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ronnaroo

What is a satsuma? I know a tangerine but it sound Japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiKomprenasVin

It's a strain of tangerine that comes from a particular part of Japan. I had them a lot growing up in Seattle and didn't really know what a tangerine was aside from the canned variety until I moved elsewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calyope3

Really? I live near Seattle but I have never seen any. Maybe i just never noticed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Dong

aww I put oranges


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lakerbat

Came back to review two months later and what did my brain choose for these little fruits? Once again, orange came out of my fingers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wackadoo1

Why is it 세 instead of 셋?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duo_Euphoria

For native korean numbers 1-4 and 20 they change when used with a counter

하나 -> 한

둘 -> 두

셋 -> 세

넷 -> 네

스물 -> 스무


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

Contracted forms are easier to pronounce. Over time, frequently used words and expressions will become weathered down to something simpler.

Take English “goodbye” for example… that came from “God be with you.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AspryWrites

Did they change the voices on us like out of nowhere?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pQpQrOPY

very difficult to hear the recording clearly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lakerbat

In Korea, there are no American oranges, so they just call them oranges. You come back to the US and there are dozens of regional names for them (I even heard somebody call them "cuties" and I had no idea what she meant!) I have never heard of satsumas before, but I don't think tangerine describes "gyul" (no Korean keyboard) quite right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maya671406

Cuties are a brand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lakerbat

In my mind, tangerines are harder to peel than gyul.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alicia922233

I thought in Korean, the adjective goes before the noun like in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

Yes… but where is the adjective in the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Indi.grt

I'm from Germany and here you can always buy oranges and mandarins but I saw satsumas in some big supermarkets


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clovita31

Are mandarins/tangerines/satsumas different from oranges?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lakerbat

I think of tangerines as lighter in color and with more seeds (and more difficult to peel). I never heard the word satsuma before this discussion thread.

I definitely agree that they are different from "American oranges" with a thick peel and a lot of white stuff (very technical term) all over the little sections. 귤 are very easy to peel, have very few little strings on the sections, and are much smaller than the gigantic "American oranges." They are also mostly seedless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calyope3

Imagine they said something about a dog, saying 개 세 개와 ... etc. That would be really confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duo_Euphoria

The counter for animals is 마리


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

Can we accept "Mikan" as a answer too? same thing as mandarin tangerines


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twices1

Can anyone tell me what are satsuma and tangerines


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twices1

Can anyone tell what are satsuma and tangerines

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