"Meneer,eetueenaardappel?"

Translation:Sir, are you eating a potato?

1 year ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OnkelD
OnkelD
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Just a comment on the really neat connections you find occasionally with French, as opposed to the expected German link. The German potato is "Kartoffel" ... the French is "Pomme-de-terre" (The French being more along the lines of apple of the earth) It's interesting that the Dutch: aardappel is more in sync with the French term... while others like "aardbei" (strawberry) line up more with the German erdbeere than the French "fraise". I guess this is why I like studying the languages so much.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
Mod
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I think the potato became popular in Northern Europe around the time of Napoleon, so it makes sense to have some French influences there.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Langohr_
Langohr_
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In Austria a potato is called “earth apple“ too: „Erdapfel“ :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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Why does it reject Sir in the more neutral final position? It's telling me it wants 'Mr., are you eating a potato?' which is horribly wrong in English.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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There is a slight emphasis in both languages by having "Meneer"/"Sir" at the beginning. By moving it to the end and thereby making it more neutral, you are slightly changing the sentence, when a closer alternative is available.

5 months ago
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