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  5. "Už dva roky je vdaná."

" dva roky je vdaná."

Translation:She has been married for two years.

September 9, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul378887

“She has been married for two years” is a simple statement of fact. “She has been married ALREADY for two years” described the feeling of the years passing quickly. It seems to me that “už” (translated as “already”) should be included in the main translation above. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong, and let me know why and how “už” is used here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

We deem the perfect tense is enough. It is accepted with already (at the end).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dianne227099

What puzzles me is why have "Už" in the sentence at all. Wouldn't " je vdaná dva roky" translate to "she has been married for two years?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dianne227099

what is wrong with- she has been married already for two years


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

The correct English translation is she has already been married for two years.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianG1941

What is wrong with"she has been married two years already". In my UK English the for is redundant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianG1941

Paulette Thank you for your response but could you explain why you consider your translation is the right one and mine is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

You can use Reply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

Adverbs usually go after has or have when using the present perfect.

We usually put already in the normal mid position for adverbs (between the subject and the main verb, or after the modal verb or first auxiliary verb, or after be as a main verb): We already knew that he was coming to visit. ... We don't use already between a verb and a direct object: I've already made the coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imaldastar

if už is present, we are going to try to add it to the translation. "she has already been married (for) two years"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

She has alreade bern married FOR two years. is accepted. Without FOR it is not. Is that correct English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

It's grammatically correct with "for." However, at least in the US, in sentences like this, constructions without "for" are often used: I've worked here six years -- He's been there four weeks -- She'll be out of work three days. I will add alternatives without "for," if it's deemed appropriate, as there are a number of reports for this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gmencontra

My translation, "She is married for two years already."

I don't understand the need for past tense. (Unless she isn't married anymore)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

"has been married" is the present perfect tense and is used exactly in these circumstances, where something has been going for some time and it is still going on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gmencontra

So what exactly makes "is married" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

She is married does not specify a particzkar time or how long- It only states a fact. Whereas has been married apart from only stating a fact also says about how long, And is used in this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daria797617

After learning the second Numbers chapter I am a little confused with declension. Could you tell me, please, in which case "roky" is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

Both "dva" and "roky" are in the accusative, which looks the same as the nominative for all numbers (expect feminine number 1: "jedna" -> "jednu"). All these expressions of how long something lasts use the accusative and they will all look like nominative unless the noun is a feminine noun ending in -a.

Budu tam... (I'll be there for...) jeden den/týden/měsíc/rok, dva/tři/čtyři dny/týdny/měsíce/roky. But for example jednu zimu (one winter) or jednu hodinu (one hour) - here we can see that it's actually accusative.

And the rule that after numbers 5+ the following word(s) must be in genitive plural still applies, even in these situation where the number itself is in accusative: Trvalo to... (It lasted/took...) pět týdnů/měsíců/roků/let. Už sedm roků/let je vdaná.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daria797617

Thank you, your help is very useful and your answers are always exhaustive. I started to learn Czech during the isolation and since that I have revealed some difficulties with learning by myself. I could do it in my native language (Russian), but this course for English speakers seems to me more consistent and logical than just grammar information in paper textbooks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

Numbers and cases associated with them work similarly in Russian, don't they?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daria797617

More likely than not, but the difference in the endings of the words urges me to look for a some catch. More than that, in Russian I haven't accustomed to use grammar rules due to something like an intuitive literacy formed by the grate number of fiction books that I've read (but this way to form the literacy could be described as a questionable one - and I doubt that this is possible in the case of a foreign language).

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