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"Ellos podrán hacer ejercicio."

Translation:They will be able to work out.

5 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/orbandora

they will be able to do exercise should be correct too!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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I favor "to exercise", but the difference may be dialectical.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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What do you mean, "dialectical"? Do you mean it may be related to dialects? Never heard it put like that before. If you look it up (https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=define%20dialectical) "dialectical" seems to mean related to the discussion of an idea, rather than to dialects of a language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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Whoops, I apparently should have said "dialectal".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl
GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl
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Sure, getting sociolinguistic and all, "dialectal" would be geographical and cultural, such as in the British use of "trainers" for US "sneakers," or Brit "biscuits" for US "cookies." "Idiomatic" would be "do some exercise" said as "sweat off a few pounds." in the US, or maybe, say, the US East Coast, in which case it could be both idiomatic AND dialectal..... ; )

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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There ya go!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl
GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl
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Cool, "dialectal." "Idiomatic" is a common phrase I'm familiar with

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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Maybe, though what I meant was not "colloquial" but "used only in certain dialect(s)".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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+1 I wonder why people had been marking this down: that translation is now accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duuuudeZ
duuuudeZ
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But, are there actual English speakers who say "They'll be able to do exercise"? That sounds like a sentence only a foreigner would say to my particular variant of American-English ears.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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Yeah, we'd say that (I'm Irish, living in Australia). "Work out" sounds like you're going to the gym to lift weights, whereas you might say "the kids can do exercise" (although "do some exercise" is probably better) which could mean running, walking, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

I agree - in fact, 'work out' sounds odd to me. As you say, it implies something more than simply exercising. Perhaps there is no Spanish equivalent for 'working out' that has the same suggestion of pushing yourself to your limits. You can do 'light exercise' you can't do a 'light work out'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duuuudeZ
duuuudeZ
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Yes, "work out" sounds like you're lifting weights to me, as well. The 'do' was what I thought sounded foreign, but you've proven some English speakers do in fact say 'do exercise'. Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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"Sometimes, people assume they'll be able to do exercise as vigorously as they could when they were younger even though they haven't done much for years." source

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/casalily

As Raftus says, we'd probably say 'some exercise'. We 'work out' in a gym. But what real people actually say n English isn't really top of the list in these lessons. I tend to put the translation I think they're looking for just to speed things up. (Then I spend the next half hour in a discussion!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duuuudeZ
duuuudeZ
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Yeah, I'd just leave out the 'do'. So, 'they'll be able to exercise'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2017lisa

Yes there are

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It sounds find to me, although I'd be more likely to say "be able to exercise" or something more specific such as "be able to do these exercises."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guelen13

Orbandora,I wrote this and works. 19/3/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ericmoser
Ericmoser
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they could do exercise should be accepted too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I believe Paulalock above is correct -- that would be the conditional or subjunctive, or maybe even the imperfect form, but technically not the future form. This may help http://www.espanol-ingles.com.mx/spanish-grammar/verbs/frequent-verbs-Modal.html

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tucotuco

Agree that "They will be able to do exercise" should be correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eahutton

Agreed. Don't know why you have been downvoted as it is a correct translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma

"they will be able to exercise." was accpeted

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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NOTE poder (futura): podré, podrás, podrá, podremos, podrán

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lee.D

Why is hacer necessary here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

I wondered that too. I translated it as 'do' so as not to ignore it but I was marked wrong. One of the translations is, 'carry out', which I would say is equivalent to 'do'. I'll try reporting it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Your post is 7 months old, but I am going to say that 'they are able to do exercise' is accepted correct today 24/Aug/2015.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

Trying to figure out what is wrong with "They could do exercise" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/XiaolongQiu

I don't think "they could exercise" is the same as "they will be able to exercise." "They COULD exercise" is imperfect while "they WILL BE ABLE TO exercise" happens in the future. Also, "podrán" signifies future whereas "podían" signifies imperfect. They are not the same. For example, by saying "I'll be able to swim", I'm referring something that will be happening in the future; but if I say "I could swim," that just means that I'm capable of swimming and there's not a sense of time associated with my capability.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aleifnilsen

Anybody else hear "podan" in the slow version of the audio?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pavlo747

Sounded like 'porgan'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

I agree and reported it a while ago.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lf4764

'They could do exercise' is natural in English- particularly when 'hacer' is even used in the Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hillberg

I should have known the answer but I can't hear the R in the audio.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalebThomp
CalebThomp
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"They could workout" didn't work

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I tried "They could exercise" and that wasn't accepted either :( Are we wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I think that would need "podrían" (conditional) rather than "podrán" (future).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

Ah, yea that makes sense. So we are wrong :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikShoemaker

I used "they could work out". Duolingo marks it wrong and suggests "they could exercise" now. I don't get this :S

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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Me too. This whole "exercise" is wearing me out. This is a tough skill

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wulfrunian

I put "take exercise" which was marked wrong but to me is a far more common expression in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duuuudeZ
duuuudeZ
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Where are you from? I've never heard anyone ever - native or foreign - say "take exercise".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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Neither have I.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Ditto

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Sure enough wulfrunian, "take exercise" is fine by me in the UK. It's no work out though; more a gentle stroll round the park.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Romulo.Np
Romulo.Np
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''to exercise''

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerJames5
RogerJames5
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I miss the Spanish lisp. I'm a beginner, and had no idea what aser might mean. Hacer, on the other hand..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahmben2001

They will be able to exercise

not accepted :(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackRue
BlackRue
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The verb hacer in this sentence is often translated in the infinitive by native American English speakers . 'They will be able to exercise.' 'Do exercise' is comprehensible but unnatural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariadengl

In turtle mode there is clearly a "de" between hacer and ejercicio. Duh fuh?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marinajone1
marinajone1
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There is nothing more annoying than a machine telling me I am not speaking my native language correctly

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Opanner
Opanner
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"ellas" & "ellos" sound identical...50/50 chance of getting it right. DL needs to listen to the different pronunciation at spanishdict.com

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Opanner
Opanner
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ellos and ellas sound identical

10 months ago