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  5. "Non capisco cosa indichiate."

"Non capisco cosa indichiate."

Translation:I do not understand what you are pointing to.

April 1, 2014

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/attcat23

Can someone explain why the subjunctive is used here? Is this a special construction with "cosa?" I'm used to mainly seeing it with "che."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silen03

You're right, sharinglanguage, this is the reason: the "che" is implicit - "Non capisco (che) cosa indichiate." (Italian speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justinnnnnnnnn

Just repeating what I have read in other Duo threads, but I believe the subjunctive is used when expressing doubt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharinglanguage

Now i think that besides that, i think "cosa" could (or, in a formal italian would do) come along "che", ("che cosa"), which could help seeing the need of subjunctive here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanni666

Yes. It is used in cases where doubt or opinion exists as is the case in this exercise. Great little thread here worth reviewing: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/8783716


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miraclepoet

Still very helpful in Nov 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gufinoverde

The subjunctive isn't required here because of cosa but because of the verb (non capisco).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RHCJ

I prefer the alternative translation:- "I do not understand what you mean" but it wasn't accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexF15

Technically, to indicate is to point, not to mean. For example, to point with your index finger. Note that both have the exact same etymological root: indicate / index. Also, in finances and other disciplines, an index is also known as an indicator. (Yes, I know: wow!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RHCJ

Sure, but mean is given as one of the main translations of indicare by the large zanichelli italian-english dictionary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexF15

I do not understand what you indicate. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpferdeort

This makes no sense at all in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexF15

I don't understand what you indicate. ☺


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scimmia0

I agree. It would be unusual to use indicate like this in English. I would say "I do not understand what you mean".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tinyset

Most of the sentences in this lesson don't make any sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnKosko1

How about, I don't understand what you are pointing out. Still kind of clumsy. I don't catch your drift is a nice idiom for what the Italian means I think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirPencil

How can I know that it means "you indicate"? Why can't I translate it as "I do not know what it indicates"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pilpilon

It would be cosa indichi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirPencil

thank you. I understand now that it's the plural form of you - right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pilpilon

yes, the singular you form would be indichi as well - indichi, indichi, indichi, indichiamo, indichiate, indichino.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirPencil

Yeah, got that. Thank you very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTzLm

My answer "... to what you are pointing" was not accepted. While a little stuffy, it does follow the rule to not end a sentence with a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesJWRobinson

This makes absolutely no sense in English. In the unlikely event that a native speaker used this sentence they'd at least use the gerund, "I don't understand what you are indicating", but even then it's a strange choice of word.

Assuming it's idiomatic Italian, however, what's the implication? Would a more accurate, in terms of sense, English translation be 'suggesting' or 'implicating'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexF15

"I do not understand what you indicate." (Duolingo) -- "you indicate that I have made an impression on you" (Dale Carnegie, American author,
http://thinkexist.com/quotation/if_you_want_to_win_friends-make_it_a_point_to/296703.html)

You can find dozens of literary quotes using "indicate" as used in this exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesJWRobinson

I'm not suggesting that "to indicate" is not an English verb, only that the specific sentence construction "I do not understand what you indicate" is awkward and unlikely, and looking at the other comments it's clear I'm not alone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredrikVEriksson

Strange sentence. "pointing at" or "indicating" would have made more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skillz

"I don't understand what y'all show." is what I was corrected to. I am not from the south of the US...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric945766

Why is it not quello che instead of cosa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivien253935

Why "you" couldn't it be: ...what "it" indicates ? (eg: the sign) I think it is the same end form for "it" and "you" isn't? Thx


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greenbroke

I cannot see what you are pointing to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sadeghTabibniya

I do not understand what you are pointing is not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/46WtNBhU

Never, never end a sentence in English with a preposition! "… to what you are pointing." It is also a very clumsy sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kath449297

Please do feel free to end English sentences with prepositions - it's not a problem.

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