1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Korean
  4. >
  5. "나는 차를 싫어합니다."

"나는 차를 싫어합니다."

Translation:I hate tea.

September 10, 2017

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bugwine

as an English person, i am beyond disgusted with this shamelessly offensive view Duolingo is promoting. blocked and reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kata.ds

As another English person I felt physical pain typing this out... treachery, blasphemy, treason.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joe141105

I strongly agree with you. Duo should reconstruct all Korean lesson. The examples and languages Duo uses in Korean course, they should be ashamed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsautumnluv

I agree. How can someone hate such a healthy, refreshing, and luxurious drink that can be used for many occasions used both formally and casually all over the world?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeeves_bond

Give the owl the benefit of the doubt, its probably only ever had that Tetley rubbish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cici455680

I can't really tell what you mean. You know duo is know for nonsense sentences so i hope this is meant as a joke


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RitaLee934

What view do you mean..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_krstlpg

"I don't like tea" must be accepted because 싫다 - dislike and 미우다 - hate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1779

Both 싫다 and 다 are hate or dislike. There is no difference in degree of hate, but you can say 밉다 when you hate someone/something for their/its appearance or behaviour. In other words, logically speaking, 밉다 is a subset of 싫다; you could use both if someone accidentally unplugged your laptop and you lost 6 hours worth of work, but you don't say 밉다 when you dislike tea just because it's hot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/omniduo

싫다 means hate and dislike.

You could say: I dislike tea, but it is not really good to say I don't like tea.

When you don't like something, it means that you would prefer something else over it.

When you dislike something, it means you have a distaste for it or hate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

In standard American English there's really no distinction. People simply say don't like the vast majority of the time. I can't recall the last time I heard someone specifically use dislike when not referring to online downvoting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cheesetakery

I mean, when you "have a distaste for" or "hate" something, that would almost certainly signify in turn that you would "prefer something else" over that original something. I don't see a clear distinction between your definitions.

I guess one could argue that the two differ contextually in terms of scale, similar to the difference between big and huge. They both define the same characteristic but to different extents. But I feel that since hate is accepted as an answer, and that certainly implies a different level of revulsion as compared to dislike, don't like should also be accepted as an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkSantol

Is it correct to use 나는 with -합니다? I thought if I use the formal verb ending I should also use 저는


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1779

"저" is for lowering oneself, and "-ㅂ니다" is for raising the listener. If you are higher than the listener, you can raise them by using "-ㅂ니다", but you don't have to lower yourself. On the other hand, it is weird to lower yourself and at the same time not raise the listener.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dexikiix

Really helpful breakdown of the concept, thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiklmor

So status is really integrated into the language! I thought the kdrama translation of "are you talking down to me?" was confusing without any language context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikkiolio

왜? 나는 차를 좋아요. (I'm not sure if I said that right)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1779

나는 차 좋아요.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linnea221395

I don't get why I need the subject marker here and not the object marker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milka707103

Think of it as tea (subject) being agreeable to you= you like tea. Or translate the sentence as "in my case/as for me, tea is agreeable" = "I like tea". I'm on the app, so I can't see if I'm answering a really old question. Not an expert though, someone else may have to correct my understanding of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah610076

I think using -를 is when the word is the receiver of your action or when you intend to say that you're doing something with/using the object/person. And using the subject marker -가 is basically just talking about it? It's just based on my understanding though idk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe544514

싫다 is generally hate/dislike and 싫어하다 is a softer, less abrasive way of saying one hates something. The same goes for a phrase like 감사하지만 and 감사합니다만


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alida491579

How can a person hate tea?? I'm offended.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilovejin

I do...... but I cheat and drink bubble tea XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onelia216460

I hate most teas ; -; Coffee all the way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leesan55

why is I hate car wrong? 차 means car too right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uno51883

It now also accept "car" as a answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nureongi

차 is homonym. Even I am korean I can't distinguish car and tea. More context needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyaLewis2

Could this be rendered 'I hate cars' or would you say that differently? I'm just asking because I thought 'car' not 'tea' when I saw this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1779

"I hate cars." is also a valid and natural translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InfiresMan_1

I love tea, but good for u duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vincent694132

Oooh, spill it, sis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conniestar16

저는 차를 좋애요.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabianF

"I dislike tea" was correct, while "I don't like tea" was incorrect. Must fix


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RitaLee934

Quoting omniduo: 싫다 means hate and dislike.

You could say: I dislike tea, but it is not really good to say I don't like tea.

When you don't like something, it means that you would prefer something else over it.

When you dislike something, it means you have a distaste for it or hate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick271452

Damn this lesson is so negative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Optional978604

Why is "I don't like tea" not accepted? Does it specifically have to be dislike? Or is it only hate? I thought 싫어합니다 meant dislike/ don't like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HJLee_62

"I hate car"이라고 했어요ㅋ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leabea87

"싫어하다" can be translated as "to dislike" or " to not like". Please accept both answers MODs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RitaLee934

Quoting omniduo: 싫다 means hate and dislike.

You could say: I dislike tea, but it is not really good to say I don't like tea.

When you don't like something, it means that you would prefer something else over it.

When you dislike something, it means you have a distaste for it or hate it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmsxm90

Me when I'm on my twitter fanacc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K-Nik

“I don’t like tea.” was not accepted. (. _ .)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SebasNiedziela

"I do not like cars" ...not accepted...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmberSunrize

Well that's a lie. I love tea!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariam675031

So why then is I dislike tea wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueStreetLight

Stop lying girl -I know you're here for the gossip (◕‿◕✿)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otaku2Learn

하지만 나는 차를 사랑합니다 (◡ ω ◡)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Le_choc

I thought we use "싫어하다" when referring to what other people hate and "싫다" when referring to what we hate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1779

싫다 is what happens in our minds whereas 싫어하다 is, as you can see from how the word is formed, how 싫다 is expressed verbally or non-verbally. The latter is observable and the former is not. So 싫다 in the second or third person, is usually in the form of quotations (싫답니다/싫대요) or guesses (싫은가 봅니다/싫은가 봐요). In the first person, 싫어하다 usually implies that you've disliked it for some time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FirdausJuzup

We not me. Tea is life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gucci._.tears

Why is "I don't like tea" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mira548501

What does the 를 in 차를 mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wang_Jackson

As an asian, i despise this sentence...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btsgay

Offensive sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sariaforestchic

Typing this whilst drinking tea haha :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melanie751893

Is car as 차 sould be accepted?

Learn Korean in just 5 minutes a day. For free.