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  5. "Čekám na muže."

"Čekám na muže."

Translation:I am waiting for my husband.

September 11, 2017

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blublevita

It did not take "I am waiting on a man." This is somewhat distinct from "I am waiting for a man," so I wonder, how would one differentiate between the two in Czech?

It is definitely different from "I am waiting for my husband."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kacenka9

This is a tricky one. As a native speaker I would always understand that as "my husband". Because if she (or he) was waiting for 'a man' they would say 'some' or 'one' or use some other determinant.

Čekám na nějakého muže. Čekám na jednoho muže.

If this sentence was used by a male that I know is married to a woman, I would be completely confused and likely ask "whose husband"?

I understand how this is confusing and am sorry about that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

I completely forgot that muž means "man" and wrote "husband" because of Russian, and I accidentally got it right. Muž i žena is "husband and wife" in Russian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I2cGAc67

As someone studying both Czech and Russian, I appreciate your posting, va-diim. Very useful bit of information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Thanks! Some people get annoyed that I do that. You should try Ukrainian and Polish on Duolingo too. They really bridge the gap between Russian and Czech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kris1953

Love your detailed answers. They are always so instructive! Thank you, Katerina.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John689425

your replies are rly helpful and this was not the first one I readed from you. Thx a lot!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/horsthartm2

"If this sentence was used by a male that I know is married to a woman, I would be completely confused and likely ask "whose husband"?", what about if a male like me would tell you? Diky


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

A man married to a woman would probably never use this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/horsthartm2

unless he is gay and starts czech?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

A man married to a woman cannot also have a husband, no matter if he's gay or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/horsthartm2

i am not married!! I tried to reply to "Kacenka9" Mod Plus

<pre>1312106 </pre>

This is a tricky one. As a native speaker I would always understand that as "my husband". Because if she (or he) was waiting for 'a man' they would say 'some' or 'one' or use some other determinant.

Čekám na nějakého muže. Čekám na jednoho muže.

If this sentence was used by a male that I know is married to a woman, I would be completely confused and likely ask "whose husband"?

I understand how this is confusing and am sorry about that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marlz95

"I am waiting for my man" is wrong?? I dont see where "my" comes from??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

The "my" in "for my husband" comes from the need of some determiner in English. The sentence would be incomplete with just "for husband". So in English we add "my" before the husband to completely specify it. In Czech it is quite clear she is waiting for her husband.

I am not a native English speaker but I think "my man" is not a correct way to refer to "my husband" in English.

You can also understand the Czech sentence as "I am waiting for a man.". Then no "my" is necessary, but again English requires an indefinite article here, just "for man" would be ungrammatical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Autumn369412

It is very common (in the US) in English to refer to ones significant other/spouse as "my man" or "my woman". It would be understood by the person they are speaking to that they are referring to their romantic partner. Similar to the way you described the usage of 'muze' to native Czech speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Common, but considered slang


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

However, můj muž means a husband, legally married, it never refers to a boyfriend or a fiancé.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafaello201673

Then, how do you say in Czech "I am waiting a man"; not a husband


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

"I am waiting FOR a man." is an accepted translation here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvoKarel

muž nemusí být vždy manžel. pokud jsem muž tak asi nečekám manžela. divný překlad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

Chápete, že to je jedna z věcí, kterou ta věta může znamenat?

"a man", "the man", "men" atd. jsou všechno uznávané možnosti v překladu, nikdo vás nenutí to překládat jako "manžel".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svrsheque

navíc někteří muži na manžela čekat i mohou.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yevgeniy437969

I think correct is manžel, not muž.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Both "man" and "husband" are currently accepted in this exercise. Both muže and manžela are accepted in the reverse exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea183695

I don't get why the sentence should be "I'm waiting for husbands", why can't I write "husband"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

I'm looking at the answer, and it says, "I am waiting for my husband."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NinaOBel

I recieved this variant too, I think, because I didn't use "my husband". "muže" is men, or husbands, but "na muže" shold be "for (my) husband". Maybe "for husband" is wrong in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Yes, "for husband" is wrong in English. Nouns require articles (a, the) or noun determiners (my, this, some, any, etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea183695

I don't know what to think about it...

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