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  5. "한국에 간 사람"

"한국에 사람"

Translation:A person who has gone to Korea

September 13, 2017

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

다 +

The has a function equivalent to that or who while specifying a past tense.

Literally, the above reads: person who went to Korea.


Now 가다 is a fairly simple example because its root ends in a vowel. A verb like 먹다 which has a root ending in a consonant takes instead, becoming 먹은.

먹은 판다: panda that ate


Still more confusingly, some consonants behave like vowels, and others like semivowel.

  • 팔다 becomes . The behaves like a silent consonant and is deleted completely. Understanding why this happens to (/l/) is another complicated matter though.
  • 짓다 becomes 지은. The is silenced, and acts as a “hiatus” between the vowels. Historically, this sound would have been weakened to /z/, but then /z/ became weakened—becoming silent.
  • 돕다 becomes 도운. The weakens into a semivowel /w/, which combines with the weak vowel to make .

But these irregularities are fairly regular; they are regularly irregular. Nearly all verb roots that end in these consonants will be transformed the same way. A will always be replaced with an .


Do not confuse the past tense with the present:

  • 가다: (past) versus 가는 (present)
  • 먹다: 먹은 (past) versus 먹는 (present)
  • 팔다: (past) versus 파는 (present)
  • 짓다: 지은 (past) versus 짓는 (present)
  • 돕다: 도운 (past) versus 돕는 (present)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1783

Note

This sentence does not mean "A person who has been to Korea." (한국에 가 본 사람)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

Are these ways of phrasing the same thing?

  1. 한국에 가 본 사람
  2. 한국에 간 적이 있는 사람
  3. 한국에 가 본 적이 있는 사람

What would be nuance of each?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tnW73

I'm Korean. I think those are pretty much the same and I couldn't feel any subtle differences among the sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MWPAlan

I put, "the person that went to korea" and it was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

“The quick and dirty answer is that you use who when you are talking about a person and that when you are talking about an object. Stick with that rule and you'll be safe.” —Mignon Fogarty, Grammar Girl

Never thought you’d find English advice on a Korean-learning course, huh? ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverKalman

Though, it's not alien to use "that" instead of "who".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniSantucci

A lot of people speak English as a second language and get translations wrong on the English side rather than on the Korean side, then ask why their English translation is wrong. I frequently explain nuances of English on here to help such people. (Why we say "in the sky" or "in heaven" but not "in sky" or "in the heaven" for example--lots of things related to prepositions and articles. But sometimes other topics.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosueJimen542039

Passive aggressive much?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sonnert

calm down he answered the question with a friendly jab


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessabanessa

Lol how was this passive aggressive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_crait

That wasn't passive aggressive!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1783

Some people say it is incorrect to use that for a person, but we accept it as a correct translation. "The person that went to Korea." is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CGTokki

"A person who went to Korea" is not accepted though... I'll flag it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harmonybear

Why is this past tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zee_bubzLe

"That" can be used instead if who


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1783

All answers with that in lieu of who are now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunday541231

Where in the world did the past tense come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YutubPlzSu

Why cant "A peson who gone to Korea" Be accepted? :,(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CGTokki

Because it is bad English. "A person who has gone to Korea" or "a person who went to Korea" are both correct.

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