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  5. "목이 마릅니까?"

"목이 마릅니까?"

Translation:Are you thirsty?

September 13, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/violetmonn

lmao the words mean "neck" and "dry" so roughly translated its "is your neck dry?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollie-Benson

목 - Throat.

They should correct the hints soon :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoreenNyar

I wrote that and it marked me wrong haha! What if Im moisturizing my neck and maybe you want some lotion for yours too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lackbittern

When Koreans are thirsty, their throat is dry. When Koreans are hungry, their stomach is empty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/musicalmarauder

Is there a part of this that indicates "you" or is it implied from context? Like, could this exact sentence be "is she thirsty" or something similar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessabanessa

To my understanding, with questions if there's no subject then it's safe to assume the subject is 'you'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pattmahiney

It's kinda like looking at someone and asking, "thirsty?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

Without context, yeah it could be anyone


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JVLS23

Neck dry?!?! Hahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shlomo_

So "is your neck dry" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian-Michael

Maybe because it's a literal translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jtj1125

Thats too much of the literal translation of each word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VivMcNamara

Each day I learn Korean I get more amazed of how different each language and culture is. Neck dry = are you thirsty? Hahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jasmine175862

Is this the statement actually used when speaking ? Or is this only a way of writing?

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