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  5. "저는 친구와 걸어요."

"저는 친구와 걸어요."

Translation:I walk with a friend.

September 15, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/viswarkarman

So 진용은 친구와 걸어요 is "JinYong walks with a friend" and 친구와 진용은 걸어요 is "A friend and JinYong walk"? Am I right to say the order determines if this is interpreted as "and" or "with"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueStreetLight

I think that is right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imzo

Is this 와 the same meaning as "and"? So is it like "I and a friend walk", or does adding this 와 to a noun just mean "I do this verb with the noun"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

It usually means "with" but relative to people, so you couldn't say I cut it with a knife (that's 나는 그것을 칼로 자른다). Think of it as being linked to 함께 or 같이 so you know it's more like "with/together."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osu6551

To make the difference in your example clear, you could replace "with" with "using". "I cut it using a knife" makes sense and means the same thing, but "I walk using a friend" is completely different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilvanaPin13

"My friend and I walk" should also be accepted as it's technically correct, although less common of a frase


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josueetcom

The -와 here is not connecting two nouns so it means "with" not "and" in this case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linnea221395

Could I also use -하고 or am I confusing things?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gus76004

yes you could, but that would have to be placed in between the 2 words, not after it. (I think)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wang_Jackson

Isn't걷다 means to walk? So, shouldn't it be 걷어요 onstead of 걸어요?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GooigiTime

걷다 is a ㄷ irregular verb. It doesn't follow the basic rule for conjugation. For ㄷ irregular verbs, the ㄷ becomes a ㄹ, and if the last vowel is ㅏ/ㅗ, add 아 to that. Otherwise, add 어.

You can look up how to conjugate basic and irregular verbs if you would like. There are irregular verbs for (ㅂ/ㅅ/ㄹ/ㄷ/르/ㅎ)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathryn91739

I always thought 와 meant "and"...can it also mean "with"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/themightyaceman

Please give a break for a spelling mistake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordanWesl7

Shouldn't "I walk a friend" be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vmk15

You can walk a dog (and in some instances your cat or other pet) but you certainly cannot walk your friend! I imagine they wouldn't like a leash round their neck to start.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raycosm

"I walk a friend" is okay in English, right? To walk someone is the same as to walk with someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben278950

That's interesting because I personally would use the phrase "I walk the dog," but I would never use that structure for another person. Maybe it is correct, but I would always say "with" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osu6551

In the American English I've always used and heard, this doesn't mean quite the same thing. Here are some examples that make it easier for me to explain it:

  1. "I walk my dog." Here the speaker is taking his or her dog out for a walk to get exercise. I don't know if it's the right way to describe it, but this one almost evokes a sense of duty on the part of the speaker. It's his/her duty to take the dog out to care for it, or he/she is being paid to take the dog for a walk.

  2. "I walk with my friend." Here the speaker is taking a walk with his/her friend. This could be walking to a destination, like a classroom, just a stroll through the park, or they could be doing their daily walk for exercise together.

  3. "I walk my friend to his/her car/house/classroom/etc." Here the speaker's friend is headed somewhere, and the speaker wants to accompany him/her. This could be someone who is leaving after a party, and the speaker wants to walk him/her to the door to see him/her off, it could be a boyfriend walking his girlfriend to her next class, or it could even be a police officer walking someone to his/her car for safety reasons.

Without context, "I walk a friend" sounds, to my ear, like number 1 when I think the exercise is trying to say number 2.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiekoot

I am from USA and I would never say "I walk a friend". People could probably figure out what you mean but they would not say it like that. It would be "I walk with a friend" or "my friend and I walk together".

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