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"Wil je een wafel of een praline?"

Translation:Do you want a waffle or a praline?

11 months ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GekPapaAl

Life is like a box of chocolates not pralines... shouldn't chocolates be an accepted translation?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Not every chocolate is a praline: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Praline

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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Exactly. In English, a praline is a nut based filling. If it isn't made of nuts, it's not a praline. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/praline

Is that the case in Dutch? These suggest that, as in German (where it can also mean a truffle - so either way, a chocolate), it might not be - always assuming that I am deciphering the Dutch in the case of the Wikipedia piece, of course. So I am confused. Is the Dutch equivalent to the English meaning or the German?

http://www.vandale.nl/gratis-woordenboek/nederlands-engels/vertaling/praline#.WseyOU2WyUk

http://www.vandale.nl/gratis-woordenboek/nederlands/betekenis/praline#.WsezfU2WyUk

https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Praline

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark958555
Mark958555
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If I read the Wikipedia right, the nut-based fillings are called praliné with the accent, but praline is used in general for filled chocolates. I believe this is what was on the Leonidas brochure I looked through when I was in Belgium a couple of weeks ago, but I can't be 100% sure there.

2 months ago