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"Ons huisdier is een kat."

Translation:Our pet is a cat.

1 year ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Alex778532
Alex778532
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I love that, huisdier, house animal!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
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So, I was under the impression that when „r" comes at the end of a syllable, it is pronounced as an alveolar approximant [ɹ]. However, upon closer inspection, it seems that there is something like the French enchaînement occurs since the following word starts with a vowel, turning the „r" into a uvular trill [ʀ]. Is this a usual phonological process in Dutch?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Maybe it is, I haven't thought about it. Very likely it's because the next phoneme is a vowel (and as when followed by a vowel, the r is pronounced as a uvular trillz it'd make sense this rule would apply not only when the sequence appears within a given word, but also when the vowel appears in initial position on the following word).

Note that this only applies in the varieties of Dutch that produce the r alternatively as a uvular trill or as an alveolar approximant.

If you choose the variety in which the r is pronounced as in Spanish, that is, alternating the voice alveolar trill ('rolled r'/'hard r', as in Spanish 'perro') with the voiced alveolar flap ('soft r, as in Spanish 'pero'). I haven't been able to figure out the 'rule'/'pattern' regarding this alternation, though, as far as I have been able to observe/hear it happens quite randomly (unlike in Spanish, where you'd only use the voiced alveolar trill when the r is in initial position, following an 's' or an 'n' or when you have a 'double r' -rr-).

Here's a video of a speaker who alternates the voiced alveolar trill with the flap, Martine Tanghe (one of the newsreaders of the VRT nieuws), she appears around 1:50 or 2: https://youtu.be/u05illJ7w2A

Hope this helps!

And also: I'm so glad to find another phonetics/phonology nerd :)

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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Is the Dutch d in mid-position usually pronounced so lightly? Huisdier sounded like huisier the first couple of times I listened. Eventually, I was able to hear the d, but it's very faint. Is this usual?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
Mod
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Hm.. It sounds normal (as in: not faint) to me, so I guess?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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Thanks, xMerrie. Maybe I'll get my ears checked out!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Well, it does sound different the way it sounds when it's in final position (when it is pronounced like an unaspirated /t/ - the 't' in 'instead', not the one in 'too'). In dier (ergo in huisdier) it sounds like a regular 'd'.

Hope this helps.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Ooops, I forgot a word: '... differen from...'. Sorry! Sometimes my mind moves way too fast and my fingers can't follow it.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ameer272503

How come we can use ons as our here instead of onze

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Because dier is a het word, and with het words you need to use ons instead of onze.

3 weeks ago