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  5. "할머니께 사과를 드리세요."

"할머니께 사과를 드리세요."

Translation:Give your grandmother an apple.

September 15, 2017

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathi881421

Shouldn't "Give an apple to gandmother" also be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabianF

This question is broken


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phytal

7/4/2020 The answer is now accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasPrik

please allow the following translations: "give an apple to grandmother!" "apologize to grandmother!" "give an apology to grandmother!" or explain, why they are not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gellybutton

Agreed for the first, but to apologize is 사과하다, which would end the sentence with 사과하세요, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAQ812

사과드리다 also means to apologize. That sentence can be so translated as "Apologize to my grandmother"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeahAlmaStein

So how would you say "grandmother gives an apple"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoLaneeSib

You say this like - 할머니께 사과를 드려요. The 세요 at the end of the sample sentence signifies a request.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmunaVinograd

I think it should be 할머니게서, shouldn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniSantucci

I believe that's correct. Most of us here are still relearning the particles (for honorifics) while forgetting we need to relearn them in the first place, and thus we fail to even pay attention to them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniSantucci

But that could just be the honorific (which is actually where the request meaning comes from in the first place).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acatarinabp

So... now "an apple" is wrong and "the apple" is right...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabianF

When will they fix this broken question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/voldemartt

Isn't 드리세요 apart from being a request form also a 요 form of 드리시다?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natalyasve1

How do you know to add "your" from a sentence....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

Context. This sentence should have more accepted translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabianF

Why the hell is "I give an apple to grandmother" wrong tf is this sht


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emsuzz

The -세요 was a request.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

That's odd because the English translation is not a request but a command.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bugwine

"Apologize to your grandmother" should be accepted as 사과 can also mean apology


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosDuar315546

The statement does not specify whether it's my grandmother, your grandmother, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BassdayeSa1

Yes I was confused about this as well..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emsuzz

"Give grandmother an apple" is accepted as of 08/18

Apparently it wasn't before?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScarletTig2

I am a little confused as to where I need to use 할머님, 할머님께, 할머님깨 뭉 할머님께서


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Supertuidi

The use of "드리다" in an imperative form ("드리세요") supposes that the speaker is talking to a respected entity, right ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/13edogawa

Why is there no ~에게 particle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soobee620

I believe that 께 is the honorific form for 에게, according to the lessonʼs tips.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soobee620

Can someone explain when we add 님 to the word? For example, in the sentences "Grandmother speaks to grandfather" and "Grandmother eats a meal" 님 is used, but in this sentence it is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhin1

~님 is a particle added to addresses to attach additional respect to the address. It is often found at the end of high ranking titles like "teacher" (선생님) or "boss" (사장님). But you can add it to any address you want.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crystle347901

What's the difference between 할머니께 and 할머니께서?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhin1

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ko/Honorific/tips-and-notes

께 is the honorific of 에게 and 께서 is the honorific of subject marker 이/가.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crystle347901

If 께서 is already for the subject marker 이/가, why do they sometimes add 는 after? (I came across this word: 선생님께서는)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhin1

You can think of 께서는 as the honorific form of the topic marker 은/는.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crystle347901

Oh, that makes sense. Thanks! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FirdausJuzup

할머니에게 사과를 주세요. This is the equivalent sentence in the normal form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wechselbalg

How do i know that it is not me who is giving Grandmother the apple? For my understanding there is no indication that this sentence is an order "imperative" form directed at me ...

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