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  5. "Das wird dich was kosten."

"Das wird dich was kosten."

Translation:That will cost you something.

April 1, 2014

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s33br0wnb0x

I just asked a few German friends and they said they have exactly the same meaning. One is just shorter and some people prefer the shorter word. Hope this helps everyone!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paukke

Danke schön! It does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaseYox

Ja, das hilft sehr viel!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abuscato

Difference between "etwas" und "was"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizzy0127

same, just shorter for etwas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zest16

More informal, maybe? Or used interchangeably?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PunkJesus

The same thing. "was" is just more colloquial.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justukyte

waiting for the answer too. from what I know now, "was" is more used in questions and reported speech when we know that there is a definite value which we seek to find out, while "etwas" is used when the value is unclear and only used in statement sentences. correct me if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/royalt213

I like how you Freudian slipped an "und" in there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kumarmanjeet

"Ich möchte etwas essen" (I want to eat something.)

"Brauchst du noch etwas?" (Do you need anything else?)

"Ich möchte etwas anderes." (I want something else.)

"Ich habe heute etwas Schönes gesehen." (I saw something beautiful today.)

"Ich bin heute etwas krank. (=ein bisschen krank)" (I am a bit sick today.)

"Hast du so etwas schon gesehen?" (Have you seen something like that?)

Also, with the sole exception of those cases when it's used as "a bit", in all these sentences etwas can be (and is, colloquially) abbreviated to was:

"Ich möchte was essen."

"Brauchst du noch was?"

"Ich möchte was Anderes."

"Ich habe heute was Schönes gesehen."

"Hast du so was schon gesehen?"

EDIT: The phrase so etwas ("such a thing/something like that") can even be fused to one single word, sowas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hortuspecuniae

why accusativ "dich" in stead of dativ "dir"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Double accusative construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hortuspecuniae

an second exception thus : " Ich frage dich etwas und das wird dich was kosten."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dortmund16

If you feed Google translate this English sentence as constructed above, it translates to "dir", so Duo may be wrong here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

By all means do not simply trust Google Translate! Duo is way more likely to be right. Both objects ("dich" and "(et)was") should indeed be accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hortuspecuniae

You're certainly right regarding "Google Translate" but the question remains unanswered. Why accusative instead of dative ? or is it the same as a double accusative as " Ich frage dich etwas" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

It's a double accusative. As to why it's accusative, there's probably not really a good reason; "kosten" (and "fragen" and "lehren" etc.) just take two accusatives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/supu1

I prefer using dativ "mir" but nowdays most people use akkusativ "mich". Here their explanation : http://m.spiegel.de/kultur/zwiebelfisch/a-309400.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TMUM4

Poor audio for 'wird'. Sounded like 'wild' both fast and slow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikPoloni

Why "dich" and not "dir"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dlehrke

Because it will cost you something. Not cost something to you. Hard to explain. But its accusative, not dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onthenatureof

"Cost you something" and "cost something to you" have exactly the same meaning. I still don't understand why is accusative instead of dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Cost something to you" sounds odd to me.

Some verbs in German simply use two accusatives; I don't think there's a well-defined reason for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/princetontiger

Why is "That will cost something of you" incorrect? Prepositional phrases do not change the content of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josephk27

That way of saying it is not proper English construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreim1828

so you're saying that "that'll cost you something" doesn't work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielle959055

"That'll" is a contraction of "that will" and both are correct (in American English). "That'll" is more informal. I don't know if Duo will accept it but it is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielbelmiro

And irgendwas instead of was?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

That's fine, but it especially emphasizes that the speaker doesn't know what that something is, which isn't necessarily the focus of the sentence. So it's a valid translation but not really the default idea of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nailed-barnacle

At the risk of stirring the grammatical pot - and with due regard to the comments below - I wonder if a suitable colloquial UK English translation might not be simply 'that'll cost you!'

I'm pulling my hair out trying to differentiate the times/places when Duo wants me to be effectively word for word and when the word for word isn't accepted and it's looking for a colloquialism.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafa_7m

Can I translate it as well as: That will cost you some.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dghitc

"Was" translates to "something" now? Danke!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vchopra

Could it also be "That will cost you that". Like if the speaker is pointing at an object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

No, then "das" would be used. "(Et)was" is specifically not indicating something in particular. It basically works like "something"-- you wouldn't say "something" if you meant something specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David5911

Why the was between dich kosten


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

It's short for "etwas" ("something").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krovine

I'm honestly getting quite tired and frustrated of this female robotic voice tripping me up. I seem to hear everything but what was meant when she speaks while the male voice is much more natural and easily understood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthmau

Could it be "it will cost you a bit"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avantha

How can 'it' come here when the German word is 'das'.

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