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  5. "À jeudi !"

"À jeudi !"

Translation:See you Thursday!

March 12, 2013

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martinsspiegel

I also put "on Thursday" and lost a heart. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coeleman

Because, as I understand it, "à jeudi" is used in a similar way as "à demain", so it has to be "until Thursday" or "see you Thursday", but someone mentioned that Duolingo doesn't accept the latter one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martinsspiegel

So, how would one say "On Thursday" in response to the question "When do you want to go to the movies?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2067

English expressions (idioms) about days don't map directly to French expressions. Whereas English says "on Thursday", French would simply say "le jeudi". E.g., Quel jour est la fête ? La fête / Elle est samedi. = What day is the party? It is on Saturday. http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/dates_2.htm So the idea to take away from this is that just because English says "on" does not mean there must be a corresponding word in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eavalis

Could a someone who knows the answer for "on Thursday/Monday etc." please reply this question? I'm wondering the same thing as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2067

Actually, "see you Thursday" is the most idiomatic English expression and although DL accepts "Til/Till/'Til Thursday", "See you Thursday" is preferred.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaKapsule44

Where are come from the days of the week in the French language ?

  • LUNDI it's LUNAES DIES, day of the LUNE

  • MARDI it's MARTIS DIES, day of MARS

  • MERCREDI it's MERCURII DIES, day of MERCURE

  • JEUDI it's JOVIS DIES, day of JUPITER

  • VENDREDI it's VENERIS DIES, day of VENUS

  • SAMEDI it's SABBATI DIES, day of SABBAT. That we indicate to ourselves directly the week has a Hebraic origin. In English, Samedi is SATURDAY, the day of SATURNE. Indeed, in French, is easier to say SAMEDI than SATURDI. But, that would have be only an usual question.

  • DIMANCHE it's DIES DOMINICA, the day of Lord. The first christians substituted this denomination day of SUN's. Religion oblige ! In spanish, it's DOMINGO. In English or in German, we still find SUNDAY and SONNTAG : day of SUN.

Source : « Clic here »


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zambonijones

This might be dumb but I thought it was "til" as in, until. I thought till was as in, till soil.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rfeuand

According to my brief research on the internet, the word til or till is older than the word until. It is not a contraction of until, though many people think it is. The oldest spelling is til, the modern spelling is till. (For most one-syllable words ending in s, f, or l the s, f, or l is doubled.) People who think it is a contraction sometimes spell it 'til. Many dictionaries and spell checks will only accept the standard modern spelling till, although all spellings are in common use. Whichever spelling you use, there will be some people who are absolutely sure you are wrong, so if you are writing something important it's safest to just use until.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margita_S

Am I the only one hearing "aujourd’hui" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blastus1

you are not alone ... aujourd'hui. Au jeudi .. very subtle difference to my ear. but of course that's why i'm here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moka2222

That is also what I heard.


[deactivated user]

    I heard and wrote "Au jour dit."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vladislav123

    'til Thursday = wrong. SERIOUSLY?!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Sapphira-

    It's actually not wrong! If you typed that and got it wrong, DL is the one messing up here. This means "Until Thursday", because "Till" is not a contraction, it is a verb. People don't "Cultivate Thursday" . . . XD ;D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
    • 2067

    'Til, till, until are all accepted variations and you may be surprised to learn that, in fact, "till" is quite correct as a short version of "until". http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/till Even so, it's better to simply say, "See you Thursday!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pamela171931

    See you Thursdsy is US English. An English speaker says on Thursday


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pandora_etn

    See you ON Thursday..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lugosky

    I have a feeling in my gut that the French speak a really simple language, but they tell everyone this is what they speak to laugh at us struggling and crying.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
    • 2067

    Comment ça va ? = How's it going? Ça va, ça vient. It doesn't really translate to English but it makes perfect sense in everyday French! ;-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blutach

    A native Frenchwoman told me that when A is capitalised at the start of a sentence of a section of a menu, for example ("A boire"), it need not take the accent grave. Can someone confirm SVP?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blutach

    Merci beaucoup. Even though Duo is trying to teach us formal written French, perhaps it should be programmed to accept this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaKapsule44

    In the good usage, the letter A should take a grave accent but, for a lot of reasons, that's getting lost.

    The first reason seems to be a typographic reason.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aloyzius

    You guys can actually underdtand that robot voice? Im amazed. I listewnd sixteen times and camr uo with "aux jus" which makes no sense and sounds like something you dip a sandwich in


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/werekitty

    I heard "aujourd'hui"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonFrance75

    Exactly I heard "Aujourd'hui" too


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardafish

    I think "til" should also be accepted as an abbreviation of "until". It would be correct in English, wouldn't it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
    • 2067

    Actually, « til » is not correct. If you are going to contract it, you must use « 'til », although « till » is accepted. The most natural English for « à jeudi » is "see you Thursday".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetetheJuggler

    Why hasn't Duolingo fixed this yet and accept both "til" and "till"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
    • 2067

    'til, till, until are all accepted, but the most idiomatic (natural) expression in English is "See you Thursday!" http://www.wordreference.com/fren/%C3%A0


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WencheHemph

    the people at Duolingo nit-pick and don;'t speak the same language I do. You have the have the words in exactly the same order in the sentence to get it right in their mind!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
    • 2067

    What word order is causing you a problem here, Wenche?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwhitcraft

    why isn't: "I will see you Thursday" accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
    • 2067

    You can embellish it, but the simple truth is that it's just "See you Thursday!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nina1657

    Why does Thursday sound like "judz"? No vowel sound at the end whatsoever!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dekstrom1

    How about someone who speaks clearly??? I heard only 2 syllables!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dilipatience

    There should be a qualifying question to warrant a 'till Thursday' response. Trying to impose another persons thinking is not appropriate nor is it safe. More information should have been made available here. Bummer!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flyings0lo

    See you on Thursday is how an English person would say it (not an American).

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