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  5. "De lundi à vendredi."

"De lundi à vendredi."

Translation:Monday through Friday.

March 12, 2013

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zebila

why not "monday until friday?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/athalaberhtaz

I had "From Monday till Friday" and it was also incorrect. I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SourireCache

It still is rejected (Oct. 3, 2014). Also reporting~


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonOmerGracey

Until would not include Friday, through would. I suspect that's why they haven't changed it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samikshas

The correct answer as duolingo says is "Monday THROUGH Friday"! Does it make any sense? I have never heard such kind of a sentence in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weilingtay

It's predominantly North American, which might explain why you've never heard it. I rarely hear it myself - not in real life, anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rhonda859305

Yes. We say "Monday through Friday" all the time as our work week her in the U.S.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rhonda859305

Typo: "her" should be "here" (in the U. S.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

It's fine, although of course it isn't a complete sentence. But the usage is common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuFarge

What part does the 'de' play in this statement? Can 'de' mean 'from'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Yes. "From Monday to Friday" is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lafayste

de = from here. Have seen "Le zoo se visite de mars à octobre" before? de also = from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mudbrat

I'm American on the west coast and to/ through are both used over here. I work Monday to Friday / we are open Monday through Friday. Are the best examples i can think of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Technically this translates to "(from) Monday to Friday". There are ways in French to specify "through Friday". Sitesurf posted one, and if I come across it again, I'll provide the link.

Beyond that, in spite of its widespread North American usage, "through Friday" is, in my opinion, an absurd hypercorrection. Generally we don't wonder if "(from) Monday to Friday" includes Monday, and it should be likewise with Friday. It's included unless otherwise specified. (Everyone knows this. Why the anxious substitution of prepositions?)

And in French it's the same. "De lundi à vendredi" includes "vendredi", but there are ways to make extra extra sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PJfCoq

I agree, i seem to be having to learn two languages, american english and french, please could there be an option for queens english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alejandrito_lp

I've just written till and this thing says to. I think it is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aademol

"From Monday to Friday" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chenn

Monday through Friday is not used in British English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flannery65

Correct. It is only North American English. Nowhere else native English-speaking uses this construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Really? Do you use "to", "until", either? Does "Tuesday to Sunday" or "Tuesday until Sunday" include Sunday or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chenn

We would use "to" and it would include both days mentioned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwarrengray

Americanism. Ugh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamiethompson81

Monday "through" Friday is specifically American English. In British English you would say Monday to Friday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicLiam

Or Monday 'til Friday, that's also common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Just be aware that 'til is a questionable spelling. See the usage note here:

Till and until are both old in the language and are interchangeable as both prepositions and conjunctions: It rained till (or until ) nearly midnight. The savannah remained brown and lifeless until (or till ) the rains began. Till is not a shortened form of until and is not spelled 'till. 'Til is usually considered a spelling error, though widely used in advertising: Open 'til ten.

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