"Kočky žerou myši."

Translation:Cats eat mice.

September 16, 2017

14 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoaoa

Fun fact: In Czech, you can put a word at the end of a sentence for extra emphasis

Normally:

Kočky žerou myši. = Cats eat mice.

Myši žerou kočky. = Mice eat cats.

But also:

Kočky žerou myši. = Mice are the ones who eat cats.

Myši žerou kočky. = Cats are the ones who eat mice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ploomich

stop everything i'm confused! doesn't that depend on cases?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renardo_11

Basically yes but both kočky and myši can be nominative as well as accusative. So the cases don't help here. I think it would be different with masculine words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gisz5

I cant understand, i m so confused... Why 'žerou' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsjanta

Because the verb "žrát" is used for animals and "jíst" is used for people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wyqtor
  • 2777

So it's basically like 'essen' and 'fressen' in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Almost exactly so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

HA! This looks like a two-for-the-price-of-one learning opportunity! Plus... if it really is, there are multiple ways to get it (grammatically) right, though one makes WAY more sense in the real world than the other!

On the other hand, there's the Word Order thing...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marion52562

How can you tell when "zere/zerou/zrat" means "eating" or "eats"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Unless it is clear from the context -- and often it is not -- you really can't tell. And in those cases, both the simple present ("eats/eat") and the present continuous ("is eating/are eating") are usually accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denial.911

so, this can be gramaticaly both situations, cats eat mice, or mice eat cats... but by logic in this world, the cats eat the mice... mmm, but maybe the mice eat cats (death ones) :§


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

The sentence is indeed ambiguous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwlizz

Is myšy also correct? (it's accepted by duo but listed as a typo so I wanted to check)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

No, there is never y after š in Czech.

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