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"Hierbij geef ik het woord aan de directeur."

Translation:I am hereby giving the floor to the director.

11 months ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NigQ7
NigQ7
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Woord == floor ?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LutzKlein
LutzKlein
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It is a different idiomatic expression in either language. In english yo give the floor to someone, in dutch it is the word.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
DavidLamb3
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In less formal English, we talk about "handing over to" someone.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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It's an idiomatic expression. "Geven het woord" is like "to yield the floor." It's giving way to another speaker (to occupy the floor or to to say a word). More casually, one might say "to hand over the mic (microphone)."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorottyaUm
DorottyaUm
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Where is floor in the Dutch sentence?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hazem211145

Woord!!!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bsarpas
bsarpas
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For those who couldn't immediately figure out the context of this sentence (like me), it uses the compound verb "het woord geven" which means calling someone up (e.g onto the stage) to give a speech after an introduction.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cian8656

"I hereby give" (or even "I am hereby giving", but not as much so) is much more natural sounding English than "Hereby I am giving". Probably because of the awkward double 'i' sound with "Hereby I".

If possible, I'd recommend you change the suggested translation.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaureenCG

I put ' I hereby give...' and it was accepted

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattSpragu2

"hereby" is really really archaic English. I've only heard it in legal language.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtemesiaG
ArtemesiaG
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Not that archaic though, but rather formal. And I always use it along with thereby, henceforth, thence etc.. for my essays. Plus I sometimes use it in regular conversations.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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And thereby hangs a tale.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H_Butler
H_Butler
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What is the difference between "hierbij" and "hiermee"?

1 month ago