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"Ik geef een appel aan hem."

Translation:I am giving an apple to him.

11 months ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kassemghaddar

And why not: " Ik geef hem an appel" ?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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That's good Dutch as well, except it's een appel.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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You used "an" (English) instead of 'een'. "Ik geef hem een appel" is accepted.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaoloCatt

Is there any difference between "Ik geef hem een appel" and "Ik geef een appel aan hem" or are they completely interchangeable?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofia-alves
sofia-alves
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what about reading the other commemnts?? :D

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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The fact that two answers are accepted by no means necessarily implies there is no difference between them. In fact, the differences can easily be quite notable, and possibly missing such differences is one of the biggest drawbacks of the Duolingo set-up.

One presumes the differences here aren't so great. However, although grammatical, "I give an apple to him" sounds somewhat awkward to me. Perhaps a similar condition obtains for one of the two Dutch sentences?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaoloCatt

Exactly, this is what I meant with my question...

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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I give him an apple, I read them a book etc is the usual word order in English. I give an apple to him, I read a book to him is acceptable though less usual. Perhaps it is because we achieve economy by losing the preposition to and putting the indirect object him before the direct object apple/book. Whatever the reason, it seems to work better for most people. Is their a difference in meaning? Perhaps the to format stresses the recipient slightly more, but I remain to be convinced.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Now if somebody would just give us similar information about the Dutch sentences :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlPolyglot
AlPolyglot
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What is the difference between naar and aan? Don't they both mean 'to'?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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"To," "aan," and "naar" are "function words," meaning they represent grammatical relationships, not specific objects, actions, or characteristics. The grammatical relationships represented by function words are rendered according to the grammar of the target language. It is generally not useful to think of them as having translations in and of themselves.

When "to" is acting as a preposition roughly synonymous with "towards" (They're running to/towards their dad), then "naar" is used. "Aan" has a number of uses, sometimes corresponding to English "to" and sometimes not at all.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fierceclaws

Does it need both 'geef' and 'aan'?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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See xMerrie's comment.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Francois317434

I would prefer "I am giving him an apple"

2 weeks ago