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  5. "저는 맛있는 딸기만 먹어요."

"저는 맛있는 딸기만 먹어요."

Translation:I eat delicious strawberries only.

September 18, 2017

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluefairy5

Can I write tasty?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

"I only eat tasty strawberries." is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fluffytranquil

I did and it said delicious was the correct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roberto727

Yes, as Winter points out, 만 is necessary to convey "only", but I've reported the sentence, because in English, "only" can be placed in numerous places in the sentence, and in fact, the suggested translation would be incorrect if "I" was emphasized, meaning that delicious strawberries are not available to anyone else, and "Only I eat delicious strawberries" is definitely not the intended meaning of the sentence. "I eat only delicious strawberries." and "I eat delicious strawberries only" are better translations, because possible confusion is removed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

"I eat delicious strawberries only." is now the primary translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/etchpad

I wrote, "I eat delicious strawberries only". I think this sentence should be accepted as adjective word order in English is pretty flexible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

"I eat delicious strawberries only." is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luna45857

Is the meaning in Korean here that I eat delicious strawberries and no other kind of strawberry, or delicious strawberries and nothing else at all? Or is either a valid interpretation? It could go either way in English, which is why I ask.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

Same in Korean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snazzy_cat07

But the only way to know if its delicious is to eat it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

Sentence breakdown:

Part of Sentence Decomposition
저는 (I) + (topic marker)
맛있는 맛있다 (to be tasty) + (present attributive ending)
딸기만 딸기 (strawberry) + (suffix meaning “only”)
먹어요 다 (to eat) + ㅓ요 (polite ending)

Color-coded word mapping:

  • 저는 맛있는 딸기 먹어요.
  • I eat delicious strawberries only.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeahAlmaStein

why is "strawberry" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

"I only eat a delicious strawberry." is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThePletch

It's based on context here - "I only eat a tasty strawberry" doesn't make much sense unless you specify a number, e.g. 저는 하나 맛있는 딸기만 먹어요 (i only eat one tasty strawberry)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

한 is the adnominal adjective for one, not 하나.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucyApril

Well, to be quite honest, many of the sentences here don't make a lick of sense so it's hard to guess when it should make sense and when it doesn't have to as far as context goes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiIippo

Why is " I only eat the tastiest strawberries" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josueetcom

The adjective has no indication of it being "the most" delicious strawberries, e.g. 가장 맛있는 -> "the most delicious".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cleoReizz

Why isn't "I only eat delicious strawberries" acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

"I only eat delicious strawberries." is currently accepted. You probably had a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josueetcom

It should be. Report it if it's not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elliot736165

Can I say, "I eat delicious strawberries" and omit the only?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

만 is the reason you write "only."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josueetcom

C'mon 만, get your head in the 게임 ㅋㅋㅋ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahnrina

why is tasty wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash-Fred
Mod
  • 1789

"I only eat tasty strawberries." is now accepted.

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