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  5. "김과 밥"

"김과 "

Translation:Seaweed and rice

September 18, 2017

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanuszWoro3

Laver is a word used in Wales, but apparently not known in the UK, and not at all in the US.

Here is a description of laverbread from the laverbread.com website:

Laverbread, or bara lawr in Welsh, is a traditional Welsh delicacy, mainly found clinging to exposed rocks and is harvested on the West Coast of the British Isles and Southern Ireland. After being gathered, the seaweed is thoroughly washed and cooked until it becomes soft. It is then minced to convert it into a thick black/green paste like texture.

In the early 19th century, laverbread, bacon, mushrooms and sausages became a staple breakfast for hard-working Welsh pitmen who needed plenty of energy. Even today, hotel guests across Wales are often greeted with the traditional Welsh breakfast with laverbread and cockles (bara lawr a chocos), another Welsh delicacy harvested from the Gower coastline. Welsh chefs also use laverbread in other recipes that include lamb with laver pesto, laver ravioli, black risotto, laverbread Dahl and sauces for canapés. Laver is also a delicacy in Japan where it is mainly used for sushi meals.

http://www.laverbread.com/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanuszWoro3

Here is another website that mentions laverbread: http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/recipes/laverbread-recipe

Their description of a recipe that uses laver:

Once described as 'Welshman's caviar' by Richard Burton, laverbread is a Welsh delicacy which is essentially a seaweed paste rolled in oatmeal and fried. Alyn Williams uses laverbread to fill homemade ravioli in this sophisticated recipe. Replace the Welsh sea vegetables with regular samphire if you can't get hold of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/parisandsky

Brit here! I have heard of Laver, and Laverbread, but it's not commonly used, and it feels a bit unfair to expect English speaking people to know the word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bondox1

I agree I was thinking what is laver? Of course they ment a typ of bread! Why could they not just say bread?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichHlywka

it's not bread. it's seaweed sheets


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyCrawfo8

Why are we calling dried seaweed "laver"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Gim does not mean any old type of dried seaweed. The English word laver is not common because seaweed is not commonly eaten in English speaking countries, but it is an English word for that kind of dried seaweed.


[deactivated user]

    It's the term for it in Wales, idk why they use it here


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danyellefeth

    What is laver? Is it supposed to be liver?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanuszWoro3

    Laver is a UK word, not used in the US. Here, people just call it seaweed.

    Update/correction:

    Laver is not a US word.

    Laver is a word that is used in Wales (which is part of the UK), but many people in the UK do not use this word.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanuszWoro3

    From Wikipedia :

    Laver UK: /ˈlɑːvə/ US: /ˈleɪvər/ is an edible, littoral alga (seaweed). In Wales, laver is used for making laverbread, a traditional Welsh dish. Laver as food is also commonly found around the west coast of Great Britain and east coast of Ireland along the Irish Sea, where it is also known as slake.[1]

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laver_(seaweed)

    Are there are Welsh students of Korean who can confirm this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hlou14

    Brit here; never heard it used in the UK.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjd27

    No, it is not a UK word either.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
    • 1781

    Janusz, both the US Oxford and the Merriam-Webster dictionaries have the word laver as seaweed or common red algae...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvedishPlumber

    Yeah i was always confused by the gim in e mart having laver printed on it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solrock92

    Ahh! This is where they derive gimbap no?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lackbittern

    Yes!

    laver seaweed + cooked rice = kimbap

    김 + 밥 = 김밥


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WildYasuo

    Gimbap also use seaweed


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEpp5

    I think we need to change it to "dried seaweed". I've never heard of laver, as most of the users also have not heard of this word.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZahZekZarin

    First they are teaching Chimaek which is a korean slang(informal words?). and this, laver at hint but not in option of answers. Please at least use the words that either used well in US or UK. Please duolingo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spaqin

    It is the best combination possible. Can't eat rice without it now :x


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hotlagirl

    Wow! I though it was a typo and they meant Liver and rice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oleyo08

    this remind me of runningman members. especially Ji seok jin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichHlywka

    "laver" is not at all common where I am from. And it's also not the answer. It would make more sense to change the answer to "seaweed sheets".

    If I want to go buy some online I simply type "seaweed sheets". BAM lots there.

    If I type "Laver" I get some gross concoction of bread and seaweed poping up. This is not at all what people mean when the eat kim and bob.

    Sheets of seaweed. Usually cut into squares. Or even small strips. And eaten with rice. You can make little rolls of them or pockets with rice inside.

    Reference: My wife is korean, my kids are korean, and I lived in South Korea for 4 years.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilahLilah08

    Annnd how the math were we supposed to know that? I mean i just assumed since its the only thing that made sense but still.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseleneJa

    I wrote kim and rice and i got it correct, Thank God i checked the comments otherwise i wouldn't know that it was dried seaweed or laver.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobJones167038

    Laver is not used at all in north america. Please have seaweed as a possible hint for us in north america


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheldonCol3

    It's always translated as simply "seaweed paper" in Korea; nobody calls it "laver".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsmcandrew

    Seriously please remove this reference to the word, laver. Never heard it before.

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