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"Wie haalt vandaag koffie voor ons?"

Translation:Who will get coffee for us today?

1 year ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EricVanErt

Am I correct in thinking that "krijgen" is "get" in the sense of receiving something, and "halen" is "get" in the sense of retrieving or fetching something?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
Mod
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Yes, that's exactly right.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pattipl
pattipl
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Previous question had 'haalt' mean 'make' (and get wasn't accepted). Why is 'who makes coffee today for us' wrong?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morna157531
Morna157531
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I thought " halten " could be translated as " make " . " Het haalt " was translated as " make it "

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phb2013
phb2013
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pattipl and Morna157531, "halen" or "ophalen" can mean to go and get something, or to go and pick up something/someone - as in a pizza you have ordered, coffee for the office, or your child from school. "Halen" can also mean to achieve something - as in running a race, or passing a grade in school - e.g. "you finished the race - you made it" or "you passed grade 10 - you made it", je hebt het gehaalt. Or, "Het is laat. Zullen we het halen op tijd aan te komen? - It is late. Will we make it on time?.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PrinsesKayla

phb2013, First, I would like to thank you for your informative post!!!

Also, Your last sentence is confusing me a little bit. I am hoping you can help me break it down.

"Het is laat. Zullen we het halen op tijd aan te komen? "It is late. Will we make it on time?."

I understand "Het is laat". So no problems here

op tijd = on time. Het halen = make it

I don't understand why aan te komen is there. It almost seems like it would translate to "Will we make it to arrival on time?"

Thank you for any insight you can offer me!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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Just taking a stab here ... Perhaps something like, "Will we achieve it to arrive on time?" It's awkward in English, but I've noticed in various exercises a few places where a generic direct object "het" is used and then echoed in a specific phrase. Here (perhaps), "het" and "op tijd aan te komen" actually represent the same thing.

This construction appears similar to an exercise about being able (or unable--can't remember which) to afford something. It's something like, "Jij kan je het niet veroorloven om een auto te kopen." -- "You can't afford it to buy a car" where "it" and "to buy a car" refer to the same thing.

It is, perhaps, a quirk of usage from an English speaker's perspective-- which is not to say that it's objectively strange, just relatively so: every language has its features that are perfectly natural within their own contexts but seem "quirky" from outside them. Consider, for example, the perfectly natural-sounding English sentence, "I think it's possible to learn a new language." What's "it" doing in there? Why not just say, "I think learning a new language is possible"?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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(And now I've got a song in my head: "It won't be easy. You'll think it strange when I try to explain how I feel.")

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bousqan
bousqan
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Why not 'take' if it is even a suggested translation?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuggeroRus

why is "buy" one of the accepted translations here? When someone asks me to bring coffee I am always supposed to pay?

1 month ago