"The bone is white."

Translation:Der Knochen ist weiß.

9/20/2017, 6:40:46 AM

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RoniH80
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In a previous lesson we learned that das Bein is also a word for bone, but here it's not accepted. Report?

9/20/2017, 6:40:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/quis_lib_duo
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Bein as synonym for Knochen is really rare and old-fashioned and mostly used in a few idioms and fixed expressions. You will almost never hear someone using the word Bein for anything but the leg(s).

9/20/2017, 6:51:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi,

"Bein" for "bones" ? I never heard that. The only word ein know is "Gebein" or "die Gebeine" used as an older expression for "bones" respectively "mortal remains". You can hear/read that in older texts or documentations.

Can you tell me where you read/heard that? Thanks :-)

regards Angel

9/20/2017, 8:45:08 PM

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In the "Body 1" lesson, Bein appears as both leg and bone

9/20/2017, 9:14:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Interessting. In my opinion it is wrong. A "Bein" is a "leg". A "Knochen" is a "bone". If you talk about a skeleton, mortal remains or old bones you say "das Gebein" or more common "die Gebeine" (more than one bone^^). There is an old bavarian expression (Boandlkramer) but also this you would "translate" to High German with "Gebeinekrämer" (old word for Grim Reaper). I really don't know where you would use "Bein" sorry.

best regards Angel

9/20/2017, 9:25:11 PM

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See below, please.

9/20/2017, 10:03:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Quis,

thank you very much for the links.

Link 1: It's a phrase/expression. When something (a yell) goes through your body. Something that gives you the creeps. We are talking about the hole living leg at a body with flesh and bones.

Link 2: Beinhaus is confusing, I understand. It's old. "Beinhäuser" are not used today anymore and the word is old. We are talking about bones (Knochen) in a "Beinhaus"). Dead bones without flesh. The building is called Beinhaus and the bones in it you call "Knochen/Gebeine".

Link 3: "Bein: zum Stehen und Fortbewegen dienende Gliedmaße bei Mensch und Tier". Again we are talking about the hole living leg at a body with flesh and bones. The example refers to a meal and yes there we say also "Bein" In the south of Germany an in Switzerland, maybe also in Austria.

Link 4: A nice collection of phrases with leg/Bein. Again we are talking about the hole living leg at a body with flesh and bones.

Knochen http://www.duden.de/suchen/dudenonline/Knochen are the bones in a body. They can also lay separately around.

There's only one phrase I know where the Germans are mixing this up. When we say "Mir tun die Knochen weh" or "Mir tun alle Knochen weh". When you worked hard the day before or made a lot of sport you can say that. It means the hole body is aching till the bones inside.

I hope my answer shows my irritation about "Bein/Knochen" "leg/bone". :-)

best regards Angel

9/21/2017, 10:27:26 AM

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Angel, I'm a native speaker of German. I know about the use of Bein these days and in older texts. That is why I wrote in my initial post:

Bein as synonym for Knochen is really rare and old-fashioned and mostly used in a few idioms and fixed expressions. You will almost never hear someone using the word Bein for anything but the leg(s).

But you need to take a closer look at the links I provided; there is a reason I specified which meanings (Bedeutungen) I pointed at. Those quotations given there all show the use of Bein as a synonym of Knochen and not as Bein = leg as we use it, for the most part, nowadays.

9/21/2017, 10:47:21 AM
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