1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "I'm in trouble! I lost my ke…

"I'm in trouble! I lost my keys."

Translation:大変です!鍵をなくしました。

September 20, 2017

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanAlexa11

Why is こまりました not accepted? Just an arbitrary DL choice, or would you not say that in this situation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vcfvct

大変です!鍵を無くしました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo358607

変 looks like a sad cat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittleWhole

The kyuujitai form 變 looks a lot messier


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EasyRider2

It looks sooo taihen!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fuzzyBSc

I don't understand the translation of たいへんです to "I'm in trouble". Is it more like "i have a problem? Is there kanji for this phase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyanpikachu12

from what I understand, one of the uses of たいへん (大変) can be to express a bad situation, like it's being used here. I'm not sure what the exact translation would be, but I'm also not entirely sure "I'm in trouble" is the closest to the actual meaning. In this context I'm pretty sure it's just expressing something along the lines of "this is bad." (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on any of this.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marloweisdead

Why would they earlier teach us 困って... for "i am an trouble" and then later mark it as incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara_han

Not an expert either but it seems more like an "Oh, no!" here than anything else


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelfwine81

I was wonder if "I'm having a hard time" might be an appropriate translation of 大変です??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

It also accepts "It's terrible!". But not "I'm screwed"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calla465568

why do you use katakana for カギ? where does the word originate from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayleeSwee2

The kanji for it is 鍵 i think カギ is used because its easier


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rikkapika

かぎ can mean both key and lock, so sometimes in writing, カギ is used to specifically mean "key". Use is not consistent. But I have not seen カギ used for lock.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sihaz

Sounds like I lost my hair not my keys...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeresaSrri

Why nakushita is not correct? I thought it could either be nakushimashita or nakushita


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waniou
  • 1048

なくした is much more casual than なくしました. Considering the first half of the question uses です, it would be very strange to suddenly change the level of politeness


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blessedregalia

When I clicked on "lost", it suggested をなくした, but when I actually put that, it was counted as wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KagayakuSeiza

The verb なくす conjugates to なくした in its plain form, while なくしました means the exact same thing except it's the polite form. They really need to have either be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim923335

It appears to be marking me wrong for not using the exclamation point? That seems strange


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim923335

Strike that, its marking the answer wrong for using the kanji?

無くしました

vs

なくしました

Why is that? Duolingo gives us the kanji in the definition for lost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/denimbluesky

Translating TAIHEN or KOMARIMASHITA as in trouble is ridiculous No one one would use that in english but it is difficult to suggest a more natural translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bazanathon

Why is です necessary after たいへん? Isn't that just an expression of politeness? What if I wanted to say this informally?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayleeSwee2

です is used because it's supposed to be polite in this case. You can just say たいへん to say it informally


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicki348527

No audio for 大変 kanji (male voice), no hiragana for たいへん


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicki348527

No audio for male voice for 大変 kanji


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/punchoi

街の動物園は 忙しい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/punchoi

大変だ そりゃ大変だ!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wurzelwutz

is it wrong to say "困っています" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I think that's what I wrote and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wurzelwutz

Danke. Dann haben sie es vielleicht korrigiert...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TENCHIJIN.

「困った!鍵をなくした。」?? Can you use 困る in this context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Yes, I used 困っています (and なくしました), and it was accepted. Yours seems mostly fine, though informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m4p0
  • 408

I wrote the exact same thing as the suggested answer, and it still gives me an error


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superlative26

The exclamation mark seems to be messing this one up for me when I type in Japanese. I can type it exactly as the given answer and it still gets rejected. I switched to the word cards for this question and it was fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timelives5

困っています。鍵をなくしました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I_am_smitten

I entered "困っています、鍵を無くしました", because I feel it is a more direct translation. Since 困 = trouble, and 困っています = in trouble.

The translation they show = 大変です!鍵をなくしました。 I would translate to English as; it's serious or terrible, I lost my keys.

Both convey a similar message, but the translation I used, explicitly says the person is in a state of trouble. The translation they show just states that "it" is serious or terrible, and is implied that someone is in a state of trouble.

Not sure how accurate my thoughts are, if at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham692890

why not the other way around. カギをなくしました。たいへんです! This was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

...Because that's not the order the sentences are in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham692890

No, it's a fair question. I often will type sentences in a different order as sometimes Duo accepts both. I want to know if saying it differently is good or not. Pity Duo doesn't give any extra information.

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.