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  5. "우리 아빠께서는 운전하실 줄 모르세요."

"우리 아빠께서는 운전하실 모르세요."

Translation:My dad does not know how to drive.

September 20, 2017

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

운전하실 줄 모르세요: does not know how to drive

here is part of the grammatical pattern ㄹ 줄 모르다 similar to how is part of the grammatical pattern ㄹ 수 있다.

is defined on Naver as a bound noun used to indicate a certain method or actual content.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadsNrgaar1

But why is it 운전하실? where does the 운전하시 come from? (with focus on the 시)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

-시- is the honorific affix.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeong-JinL

Infix to be specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jofanwang

Thank you for the detailed explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcguirepatr

Nice explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItsSejong

What does the 수 mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Subrisus

ㄹ 수 있다 indicates something that can be done


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobaBunny5

Is 줄 similar to an honorific/more polite version of 수? Or is it a more specific way to describe the action that "can" be done?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KikaTM

So far, I know about these 3 different ways to express the same meaning of (not) knowing how to do something:

  1. 우리 아빠께서는 운전하실 줄 모르세요. (~ㄹ/을 줄)
  2. 우리 아빠께서는 운전하시는 것을 모르세요. (~는 것)
  3. 우리 아빠께서는 어떻게 운전하시는지 모르세요. (~는지)

The second one, using ~는 것 may sound quite strange tho. Are there any other constructions that are used to express "to (not) know how to do sth." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jennifer921388

Isn't 아빠 very informal? Why does it have the formal suffix 께서?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mxriii

It's kind of hard to explain, but the use of 아빠 works better in this case. It's not very informal, either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvedishPlumber

So it makes more sense to use 아빠 instead of 아버지 here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iron_Venema

Wondering that too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryantOB

우리 can also mean "our" as well as "my" so "Our dad doesn't know how to drive" should also be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DengkeSha

Isn't this ㄹ 줄 grammar structure used strangely here? The sentences seem weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesChristiansen

Will someone please explain how the plural 우리 can mean "my"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eduardoxxi98

In Korea, when you talk about something or someone that is shared with other people like: family, school, home. You use the 우리 to give a more polite meaning of "my"

Example: 우리 집은 아름다워요 (Our [my] house is beautiful)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashleythegato

me when drive jojo music plays

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