"She ate a sandwich with tomato and cheese."

Translation:Вона їла бутерброд з помідором і сиром.

1 year ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jmYi6

Бутерброд is openfaced, that is, a canape. A sandwich is сендвич in Ukrainian, named after the Earl of Sandwich.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sagitta145
sagitta145
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1) This is true, but then how would you translate бутерброд, really canape? How many non-native English speakers even know this word? :D

2) Usually sandwich in other exercises has options сандвич and сендвич, so I'll add it.

UPD added сендвіч, сендвич and сандвич should be enough x)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmYi6

If what is meant is an open-faced single slice with something on top (typical in Ukraine and other parts of Europe), then it's actually a canapé. If it's two slices with something between (more typical of English countries), it's a sandwich. And in Ukraine we use сендвич for that kind of bread. We don't call it a бутерброд (which is actually a German word meaning buttered bread!).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sagitta145
sagitta145
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Nah, here it's a bit trickier: an American-looking kind of sandwich, say, a triangular-shaped one or one with more than two slices of bread is for sure a сендвіч or other variation of spelling/pronunciation.

But what my mom gave me to take to school was still a бутерброд even though it wasn't open-faced. It was a бутердрод with an extra slice of bread on top to keep it intact. And what we take to picnics or eat on the road in a car looks like that, and is still called бутерброд, not sandwich.

So it's not really a matter of shape but of the region. Same as tornado and typhoon...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmYi6

If people put two butterbrods together that are then separated before eating (which make sense when packing them and I've done that myself when traveling), then they remain open-faced. Sandwiches simply weren't much of a concept in Ukraine until western snack foods were popularized, along with chains like McDonald's and Mr. Snack.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sagitta145
sagitta145
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No but this is exactly what I'm saying, it doesn't have to be open-faced. Open-faced is a home version, covered with another bread is a take-away one :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmYi6

The English should be "She ate a tomato and cheese sandwich," as the tomato and cheese are on the bread, not a side dish to a sandwich with some other filling. Same with "tomato salad." The phrasing here is a literal translation from Ukrainian.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sagitta145
sagitta145
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Can't one say "sandwich with cheese" meaning a sandwich that has cheese in it?.. (maybe not only cheese)

I agree that "tomato and cheese sandwich" for sure has to be accepted, my bad, added it. But I think "sandwich with tomato and cheese" is still fine. It doesn't say "sandwich with a tomato and cheese". I wonder if the Ukrainian sentence can mean that too though, I'm trying to repeat it in my mind many times and get a feeling :'D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmYi6

Of course many of these statements are literally correct (grammar etc), but it's not how people say it in English. Fortunately, this is not a course in learning English! LOL. If people describe a sandwich in English, they're more likely to say "Mine's got tomato and cheese" of "I'd like a tomato and cheese sandwich." I think the real issue is that the choice of topics and specific sentences in this course is poor. They actually aren't designed to teach people basic communication in the target language, seems to me. In Ukrainian, for instance, you can't actually say "I'm eating a tomato and cheese sandwich," "a" referring to the sandwich, of course. You have to say "I'm eating a sandwich with tomato and cheese." So the responses for the Ukrainian have to match the appropriate phrasing in English, not be a literal translation of the Ukrainian, regardless of how grammatically correct it is, in my opinion. And these differences need to be pointed out so that learners can "get" the differences between the two languages. Yes, you can translate Ukrainian into English and English into Ukrainian relatively literally (word for word) and more-or-less have the result both grammatical and understandable... but it's not the way the two languages work. They have a very different syntactical structure oftentimes. And that's how readers can tell when a translation was done by a non-native speaker.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sagitta145
sagitta145
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OMG yes you're so right. Like, why is this sentence even like that? Why tomato and cheese? We don't put tomatoes in our бутерброд really! Cheese would've been just enough for the exercise x)

And that one with Я маю віру. Why is it there? It's weird, hard to translate, not very useful, unclear... There are just so many sentences with віра that are better... But well :) As you said, good that this course doesn't teach English :D Makes learners think a lot and feel what a translator feels X)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmYi6

:)

1 year ago
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