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"The days are short and the nights long."

Translation:Dny jsou krátké a noci dlouhé.

September 22, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janmunroe

Because of the choices given I correctly answered the question. BUT... Den is masculine, correct? Is Dny masculine as well (so if we're following rules, kratke should be "kratki") or does DEN change to feminine in the plural as DITE does? Noc is fem. in both singular and plural. That I get.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Den is masculine inanimate. There is a poetic animate variant, but that is an advanced topic.

masc. animate - krátcí
masc. inanimate - krátké


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xaemp
  • 1007

PL: Dni są krótkie, a noce długie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

RU: Dni korotkije a nočí dolgije


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Divo798125

Is it acceptable to say "dny jsou krátké a noci jsou dlouhé"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

There was no specific report button for incorrect "correct answer," so I'm posting in this discussion. It showed "dni" as the correct answer instead of "dny."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValaCZE

Dni is archaic and not commonly used, but you still can find it in literature or poems.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vincent177679

Shouldn't 'the' be left away here? It noe sounds more like a generic note, that days are always short and nights long instead of the days are short, which would be in my opinion more sound like you were talking about a specific amount of days or a period rather than days in general. Sorry if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

That is not a generic truth, it is only true for some time of the year. It is winter now. The days are short and the nights long. In summer the days will be long and the nights will be short.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vincent177679

But should't you put ten dny in Czech to make clear you are talking about 'the days' instead of 'days'. Since days alone could be a correct sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

No, in Czech we wouldn't use the demonstrative (ty dny) in this sentence. It is accepted here, but not very natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vincent177679

Makes sense, děkuji!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

I know the czech language doesn'T always articles but I am still not clear as to when it is used and when not Here it was not accepted. Why isn't it an option?

Ty mašiny jsou dobré. Hier it is accepted but not with Dny jsou krátké a noci dlouhé. Help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Czech never uses articles, it does not have any. It sometimes uses demonstrative pronouns. Those are not the same thing as articles and are used differently.

See the conversation with Vincent. It is accepted here but not really natural in the most common sense of the English sentence. If you just want to comment the current situation and say "The days are short and the nights long." to address the current length of days and nights, use just "Dny jsou krátké a noci dlouhé.". Using "ty dny" is more like "those days", some particular days that were already discussed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

What role does ty in Ty mašiny jsou dobré play? If that is not an article then what is it considered to be here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

It is a demonstrative pronoun or just demonstrative. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demonstrative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

ok In english the Demonstratives are this that these those and in german der die das among others der die das in English is also the. So , because there are no articles in Czech. the ten ta to are demonstratives in the singular and the sentences that we do in the exercises are not beginning sentences but sentences that would come after another right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I am not sure I completely understand the "and the sentences that we do in the exercises are not beginning sentences but sentences that would come after another right?" bit.

The sentences that contain demonstrative can indeed be a reaction to another sentence but can also be a start of the conversation when you see something, hear something and you are describing it or commenting it. Or it can be a reaction to something from some other day.

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