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  5. "짠 소금"

" 소금"

Translation:Salty salt

September 23, 2017

75 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trashmunki

In unrelated news: water is wet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darren453252

Don't be salty, it's just a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ryebread.exe

I mean.. technically water isn't wet. Wet is an adjective to describe what water does. You cant wet water. So therefore.. water isnt wet..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DatGuy397551

And so the debate rages on


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cici455680

XD i was about to reply that but you beat me to it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronniesseb

But what is 'wet'? Clearly if water has water on it and is made of water it clearly is wet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dawnatdusk

Then again we'd call it weter, not water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iad58g
  • 1429

We kind of do. The English words wet and water go back to the same Proto-Indo-European root *wed-.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jess76231

If you want to talk technicalities, one molecule of water isn't wet. The second you have multiple molecules they are wet because they are in contact with other water. And therefore any detectable amount of water we may come across is wet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valencia25174

I can't stop laughing. These comments are the best xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sebihoo

Why are salty (짠) and salt (소금) completely different words?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_crait

In Spanish, they call strawberries, "fresca," which is the same word as "fresh." Fresh strawberries = fresca fresca. Some Spanish speakers, I would assume, think that the word for "fresh" came from the word for strawberries and may assume it is like that in other languages, like how we all use orange and orange. Does "salty" even come from "salt?" I think the better question would be, how come we use the same word for both of these?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lackbittern

Something salty tastes like salt. Something nutty tastes like nut. Something sweet... tastes like sugar! So salty and salt in korean are as sweet and sugar in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iad58g
  • 1429

That analogy does not quite work. Salt has been known to mankind for a very long time. Sugar is a recent invention.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calyope3

Its not an "invention" it comes from SUGAR CANE which is a PLANT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iad58g
  • 1429

But it doesn't come out of sugar cane by itself; it takes human effort, and a technology that had to be invented, to extract it. Not to mention that sugar cane doesn't grow in most parts of the world. And before people had sugar on their tables, they didn't know that there was such a substance in nature and had no use for a word for it. Which is why the English word sugar is ultimately from Sanskrit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmolinga

In spain we call fresa to strawberries, not fresCa. But I get the point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EEdLoh

Probably because the saltiness is the concentration of the flavor of salt in a food. I do see your point though. It is possible that naturally salty food was present in Korea before salt was common enough to have its own word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulietSanc10

I thought strawberry in spanish was "fresa."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulinschen

Well not that I don't agree with you but in Spanish strawberries is "fresa" not "fresca"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_crait

Thanks for the clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Z4c41

not to be pedantic but strawberry is not fresca and also is not fresa in every spanish country, in mine we call them frutilla.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amvms21

Strawberries is "fresa"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephLind16

The Spanish word for Stawberry is fresa, not fresca... lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zac2021

No we don't. However, it kinda happens witht the word for sweet and sugar (dulce y azúcar). They're different, but they have a direct correlation. However you can grasp it by the fact that a sweet (un dulce) is sweet flavored because it has sugar in it. I guess it happens with most to all of the languages?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brisis

Im spanish speaker and never in my entire life heard someone say fresca as Fresa (strawberry) someone make a prank on you its fresa fresca no fresca fresca XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isoybean

You couldn't be more wrong. Strawberries are called fresas (or frutillas in some South American countries.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Straw_Neige

Strawberry is fresa or frutilla in Spanish. Don't confuse people, please. And if you don't know, just say you don't know or don't comment at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isoybean

That's just how Asian languages evolved. A lot of other languages use different words for the mineral vs the flavor/sensation. In Korean, it's doubly apparent because 소금 is Korean and 짠 is Sino-Korean. You also have to consider that these translations are not perfect or absolute. For instance, salty could also be 소금기 있는 in certain contexts ("there is salt essense" or "there is saltiness"). On the English side, salt could also be a verb or adjective and could even refer to a different mineral altogether as there are different kinds of salts (i.e. the 9 different kinds used in fireworks.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaphaelNing

I get your point, but 짠 (or 짜다) is not Sino-Korean. In fact I don't think ㅉ appears in any Sino-Korean word. The hanja for salt is 염 (鹽), and the hanja for salty is 함 (鹹).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

Not to mention "salty" has also come to mean the state of being irritable or upset over something petty or trivial.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanNorris1

Just like sweet sugar i guess


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShelyMelin

In Bahasa Indonesia, Salt means Garam, and Salty means Asin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chromberries

Mr Garam is also a world traveler!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rojo999459

It's like how sweet and sugar are different in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian-Michael

In Tagalog, salty (maALAT) and salt (asin) are different words. Saltiness on the other hand is alat or kaalatan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ladydessy

I ask myself the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alyjaanapa

salt is a noun while salty is an adverb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calyope3

"Salty" is an adjective


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conniestar16

How salty can a salt be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KPopfangirl639

that is a good question! it can be as salty as salt sometimes!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dawnatdusk

in proportion to water's wetness


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dhawal.Vaghela

Salty Salt and the funky bunch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilmellogirl14

Salty salt and the funky *brunch xP


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiKenun

짠 소금은 짜다


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe544514

미국 표현으로 하면: Don't be salty. = 화네 지마요.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qb000

Sugary Sugar. Peppery Pepper. And so the list continues..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingDecker

Why is the salt, salty? Who annoyed the salt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iad58g
  • 1429

너희는 세상의 소금이다. 그런데 소금이 그 맛을 잃으면 어떻게 다시 짜게 할 수 있겠느냐? (Mt 5:13)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Galaxiaa__

Such a delicacy, paired with peppery pepper gives you the ultimate combo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalomeLau

This reminds me of the time Jin said that salt was salty....and he then he tried it afterwards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tontonzark

In chemistry, a salt is formed by the neutralization reaction of an acid and a base or is composed of cations and anions. So it exists" salts" which are not "salty".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gray_Roze

The more general kind of salt, which you're referring to, is called 염 in Korean. 소금 just refers to table salt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thesoundmachine

but other salts are not named as 소금 lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EEdLoh

Is this similar to crusty crust in any way? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CooperReid4

As aposed to sweet salt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thesoundmachine

as opposed to.... sweet salt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmberSunrize

I thought of SaltECrafter...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuperBloo20

did someone upset the salt ? :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aio0613

Now I think of Jin. "Salt is salty" - legend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlitchySou

Ah, yes. Floor is made out of froor


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelCordo192764

We learn something everyday


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyrael1701

Like peppery pepper, watery water, smelly smell, sandy sand, soupy soup, tasty taste, sweaty sweat, thirsty thirst, hungry hunger, meaty meat :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dawnatdusk

I sure hope it is


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btsgay

I prefer it sweet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenusFlyTrap21

Weird, 'cause my salt isn't salty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdharper

Not to be confused by yellow snow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calyope3

Just got chills thinking about when kids my age like to put apple juice on the snow to make it appear yellow...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyrael1701

Snow can be yellow :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrennanTan1

What the ❤❤❤❤ is salty salt?

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