1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Korean
  4. >
  5. "부모들과 자식들"

"부모들과 자식들"

Translation:Parents and children

September 23, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelloMichaelh

One of the English options was "Grandsob" typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessabanessa

Grandsob (n.) When life just really sucks and you need one huge sob to release your pain and frusteration

After John was fired from his job on the same day his girlfriend dumped him, he took one grandsob and went to bed.

ㅋㅋ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvedishPlumber

Or perhaps a grand 개새끼? Like a really nice one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talychaengie

comment of the day ㅋㅋ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Druckles

Do the 들s here explicitly imply multiple sets of parents and children? Like "peoples" might?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaStok10

Yes 들 is the plural marker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniSantucci

Yes, but does one father and one mother (two parents) count as plural, or does 들 in this case require more than one father and more than one mother to use it correctly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuG1013

Are there specific situations for the use of ~과, ~와 and ~하고?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HOPE516110

From what i learned 하고 used to connect sentences and 과, 와 to connect words and 과 is for words end with consonant and 와 is for words end with vowels


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danyamae

Be careful if you use the word 자식 because it can sometimes be translated as a way to insult someone's parentage (" you SOB," etc). Also if you call someone 자식(or 자식아) it could be like saying "dude" or calling them immature. Its not inherently a bad word but often has bad connotations... so use it wisely


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniSantucci

The Korean word for "parent" is literally "father-mother"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

It seems that 어버이, the original Korean term, was displaced by the Sinitic and is now literary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ketilOgAstrid

Is 자식 more like "offspring", but used more commonly?

Learn Korean in just 5 minutes a day. For free.