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  5. "남자가 케이크 두 개를 먹어요."

"남자가 케이크 개를 먹어요."

Translation:The man eats two cakes.

September 24, 2017

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JocelynCurrie

Oh my lord i thought it was,' a man ate two dog cakes'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nilin13

Can 개를 be used to demarcate a piece of something? I thought it meant he ate two pieces, not two whole cakes!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

Two pieces = 두 조각


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

So is 조각 a different counter to 개, or is 조각 a noun that needs to also be used with a counter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

In this sense it's a counter word meaning "piece". In other senses it's a carving/sculpture or the formation of a Cabinet. It's a noun either way. Some other counters act as adverbs. It's not listed in many lists such as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_count_word (but it is here: https://www.koreanwikiproject.com/wiki/Counting_items ) so I rather suspect it's optional on the street, only when you need to stress the meaning, as the equivalent seems to be in Japan. Like when there's a whole cake and you want them to cut you a piece, rather than when it's sold as one already wrapped . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UltimetaSy

Ate = 먹었어요. Eat = 먹어요.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiraumF

Ty, past verbs must be extra hard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goohayoon

Nope it's easy. Just learn the rule and follow it. Best of luck.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyeongs

Okay, 개를 means piece(?), so i though that man ate two pieces of cake, but it's wrong. So why is 개를 in the sentence?? (Wait, while writing this i remember about count words.. Is 개 a count word in this phrase??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheRealRial

Yes, 개 is the default count word in Korean. Other common count words are 명 for people and 마리 for animals.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harshita13062013

Thank you so much that was a really great help!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AryaRose

From what I've seen 개를 means unit. Since it's 두 개를 it's 2 units. It can't be pieces. A unit is a whole cake so it's 2 cakes. Hope I helped ♥


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dondegroovily

I like to think of 개 as meaning "of them" - so 두 개 is two of them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harshita13062013

Yupp... Helped thank you!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tontonzark

개를 means as well a dog than a unit. the sentences of this lesson are very confused. They should mention what the 개를 means and when we have to use it !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

The way DuoLingo teaches (unless you read the Tips and Notes in thw browser version beforehand) is to grt it wrong the first time and do it again correctly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_crait

Is this about me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HanakoFukui

Another accurate translation would be: The man now has diabetes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AryaRose

I've always thought 2 is 둘 Is it written 두 because it has 개를 after?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikipyon

Same question. What are the rules on this one? Why is the last letter removed when there's a counting wors? I noticed it's the same with 하나 >한, 셋 > 세, 넷 > 네.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duo_Euphoria

Native korean numbers 1-4 and 20 change when used with a counter

하나 --> 한

둘 --> 두

셋 --> 세

넷 --> 네

스물 --> 스무


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laz.z.y

So "둘" must be used alone, and "두" with "개(를)"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duo_Euphoria

With any counter yeah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiraumF

Is it socially acceptable not to say the counting particle in korea? Like, is it common or akward?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Balaur

It's better to consider them from a grammatical perspective rather than a social one. They are simply part of the grammar of the language, and I don't think native Korean speakers would ever omit them altogether (though perhaps the specific usage might occasionally differ between the formal standard language and colloquial speech). However, if a learner of Korean speaks the language relatively well while intentionally leaving out counting words, I imagine it would be awkward; though if you're a beginner and don't always use the right counter or occasionally forget to use them, I'm sure Koreans would be understanding.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chromberries

But... are the counters too formal? Or do koreans use them in everyday speech? That was the question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

Always use them. They have nothing to do with formality levels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Woojin040897

"Sir those were for the twin babies birthday"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WinnLeong

The man ate 2 pieces of cake should be correct right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shazenmin

The verb 'eat' is not in past tense. If it was it should be 먹었어요


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeLarissa1

I GET WRONG FOR WRITING "THE MAN EAT 2 CAKES" WHAT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

When "to eat" is in the 3rd person singular, it gets conjugates as "[he/she] eats". This course assumes you already have native fluency in English, and will mark you wrong for small mistakes like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AuntE3

Why is the word dog in the Korean text?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chromberries

It's an object counter, yeah confusing ik


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GangarKun

Okay but that's a big mood


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aerchii

Is the dog a typo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

There's no dog; here, 개 is a count word. Korean, and many other languages, use special words in conjunction with cardinal numbers and nouns to indicate how many there are of something. Japanese and Chinese have a bunch of these "counters", each for different kinds of nouns. Korean, thankfully, is much simpler, and for now we just need to know 개. If you see a structure like this, where you have a noun like 케이크, a number like 도, then 개, there's no dog; it's saying how many cakes there are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GygaxGirl

A bit confusing. I thought he ate two dog cakes but I hovered over the word for dog and saw it also can mean "units". So, in English we would say, he at two WHOLE cakes. That's a lot. I think he probably died of diabeetus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duo_Euphoria

Ate is past tense, which would be 먹었어요 rather than 먹어요


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dondegroovily

남자는 뚱뚱합니다


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiaraMaeGa

Where's the word Dog (개를)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dondegroovily

You really should read the other comments before commenting here.

As other comments have already said, 개 means dog and it's also a grammatical marker used for counting. The usual format for numbers in Korean is "noun number counterparticlecaseparticle", so in this case, 개 is the counter particle, not the word dog.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rucha507677

Can someone explain what 개를 is and why is it added after 두?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aerchii

Ok wait, so if "Gae" means 'piece', then why does it not show that? Not to mention I got it correct without putting that in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

This is a relatively new course with only a handful of contributors; mistakes pop up a lot.

Should also note, 개 doesn't necessarily mean "piece" like a piece of cake, but more generally is used as a count word when specifying how many of a thing there are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Navjeetkau697982

Then why is dig here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr1shya

Two pieces because it says 도 개를. Isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

두 조각 is two pieces of cake, 두 개 is two cakes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

So 조각 is also a counter, or is it a noun that doesn't need a counter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trininity

i wrote the man is eating two cakes and it said i was wrong because i didnt use the word 'eats' (as opposed to 'is eating')

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