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  5. "Máme velkou žízeň."

"Máme velkou žízeň."

Translation:We are very thirsty.

September 25, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

This exercise sounds funny in Russian. "...vělíkuju žizň" means "a grand life." "We have a grand life!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Medape99

It is like german: Wir haben großen Durst.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rBhr5

My answer 'We have a big thirst' was marked incorrect. I understand that 'We are very thirsty is a colloquial translation, but as an Australian English speaker, I don't see my literal answer as wrong - it is actually sometimes used (e.g. in relation to beer).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

It may be regionally used, but I think it would normally cause a mark as a mistake in standard English language tests (both American and British).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rBhr5

OK, I will have to accept that decision, and thanks for your reply. But for the sake of argument I will point out that if you replace 'big' with 'huge', it works in English. For example, it is standard English to say 'I have a huge thirst for knowledge' or even (less metaphorically), 'By the end of the day, I had developed a huge thirst for a good beer/lemonade etc'. So I think that the expression 'a huge thirst' is quite common in English, even if 'a big thirst' isn't - and after all, 'big' and 'large' are synonyms in English. A lot depends on context, and because English has so many synonyms, what sounds awkward with one word can often be common with a synonym. So I'm thinking that if someone answered 'We have a huge thirst' it ought to be acceptable, even though it seems that 'We are very thirsty.' would be the closest English equivalent to the Czech idiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro_42

"Máme velkou žízeň" literally means "We have a big thirst", right? Is the version "Jsme velmi žízniví" (literally, "We are very thirsty") also accepted? Which one is more common?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Yes, that's the literal translation. I can't answer your first question, but I would say that "máme velkou žízeň" is almost certainly more common, since that's the only version I've seen in various sources.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/endless_sleeper

Mít žízeň/hlad is definitely more common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

"Jsme velmi žízniví" (the literal translation from English) actually sounds more like it's our trait - i.e. we are very thirsty people, all the time, not just now. It could also be used to express "We are thirsty (now)", but it's quite uncommon - for instance, someone might use it on purpose to sound funny.

"Jsme (velmi) hladoví" is used a little more frequently, but again, the standard expression is "Máme (velký) hlad".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alice805457

I am not sure about how to pronounce that new diacritical mark on the ñ. Am I hearing it correctly as "ng"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

It is pronounced similarly to n, but the tongue position is more backwards (palatal or intermediate between palatal and alveolo-palatal), normal n has the tong on the hard palate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

From the Tips & Notes for the Hello Skill: "ň is roughly like an n followed by a consonantal y, but it is one sound rather than a combination of two."


[deactivated user]

    why it's velkou here?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

    Žízeň is feminine.

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