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  5. "맞아요!"

"맞아요!"

Translation:That is right!

September 26, 2017

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sparky_Mularkey

My Korean teachers used to say this to us all the time when we answered correctly. Seeing it here gives me a dose of nostalgia. ♥


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renemarlon

I got the reference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wang_Jackson

Is that a pokémon reference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueStreetLight

If you removed the "요" would it still make sense, just being less polite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIXCan_ix

I think it would just mean "Right" or "Correct". But yes, it still makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_MsLexi_

Right as in direction or right as in correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jr.Sporty

Right as in correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

동의하다 = to agree


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeiSam

So much nostalgia, so often I would hear/say: A- 진짜?! B- 내, 맞아요!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jr.Sporty

왜 "yes" 는 아니애요?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeiSam

I liveys in Korea and I've never even thought of it as yes. More "thats right" or strictly confirmation. 내 as in agreeing or showing understanding, but not used as definitely, 아싸 as awesome/celebritory yes/yay but I think of 맞아요 more as ...strong confirmation; usually reinforcing that something is correct or truly happened.

I also lived in Japan and Korea and Asian languages have distinct words for some of our more broad terms "yes, broke (shatter, tear), good (talent, delicious, pretty), hot (weather, bright, liquid, solid)" so keep in mind not just the meaning but usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertGoug6

I wrote 'yes' as well. Natural language, it seems, is not as accurate as formal. Kinda like how I say "thank you" and Americans say "uh huh" instead of 'you're welcome' (TIC)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrashTiye

So this is the translation of "right" as in "correct" yes? If so, why does this have a formal mood in Korean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

At this stage, we are learning Formal Mood polite. and these verbs have endings like 아요. There is a long tips and notes on the Duolingo website. My brain hurt quite a bit becuase of all the irregular verbs and rules about changes to the verb stem.

I was glad, however, to learn this form is most common to textbooks, phrasebooks, speaking to colleagues, and folks like taxi drivers and waiters. Finally, a safe space for most conversations (except elders and bosses),!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fir72405

The casual way of saying it is just 마자


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/merazjoon

I FINALLY get to learn this word, thank you Edward ✊


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beans00

it sounds like 맞 ends in a J, doesn't it end in a t though? is it because of the empty vowel in the next word that makes it sound like a j?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeiSam

Yes, think of it as carring over the constonant to the empty space whenever available


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomiriseu

맞아 psycho psycho


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiaArmyStayMoa

서로 좋아 죽는 바보 바보~


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan506736

I thought about Tzuyu right away!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anhuy.tran

I thought she said "마트 가자" (let's go to the mart)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the1684278

~insert J-hope's voice....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mrs.DryAsfLeaf

I knew this one because of Kdramas, so I didn't even needed to tap the line under it :D

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