1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Sie sieht ihn gern laufen."

"Sie sieht ihn gern laufen."

Translation:She likes to see him walking.

September 26, 2017

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreiDege

The order is very confusing for me. First it 's "sieht" and then "gern" after "ihn" and still it determines "sie". And i was thinking at this translation "she sees he likes walking". Why? What's the basis of this order?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Adverbs generally come after the personal pronoun if there is one behind the verb.

So the gern comes after not only sieht but also after ihn as that is a pronoun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanRankin1

I give you a lingot, but I still don't understand. I saw further on somebody who wrote what she sees he likes to run would be like but it used several words that have not been taught yet. Would you be so kind as to using laufen and gernen show how we would say "She sees that he likes to run"

THanks so much. Your comments are always very helpful!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ninopiamonte

My guess:

Sie sieht, dass er gern(e) rennt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheZiGO

I think 'rennt' and 'gern(e)' should be swapped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

In a subordinate clause the verb goes to the end of the clause, so swapping them would not be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiorgiChom

How will be translated this: "Sie sieht gern ihn laufen." and this: "Sie sieht gern seine laufen."

20 Lingots for correct translates :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

Dude, you posted 3 of these on here. First, please remove, at least, two of them.

And, if you wish to keep one up, please understand that it appears that your sentences are not properly written, and therefore, cann't be properly translated. If you had followed the discussion, you'll see where the proper placement of "gern" is supposed to be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaSieg5

Why is "walk" not accepted when "walking" is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ikwilvertalen

I agree, "she likes to see him walk" sounds fine to me. Make sure you report it next time so it can be added as an alternative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElibeyElili

likes to walk or like walking


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

Neither. "Gern" (like) is what SHE is doing, not HIM. He is just running/walking. She "likes to watch him run/walk". The lesson doesn't address whether he is enjoying the run or not, he is just running, and she seems to like what she sees.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gail616867

a-ha moment Thank you! That was VERY helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rudgedw

Could someone explain why this doesn't mean "She likes to see him enjoy himself walking." It's unclear to me why gern refers to her seeing and not him walking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polk280

because "gern" refers to the verb in the sentence, which is "sieht" and the one who is doing the verb is her "sie", meaning she is the one who is "enjoying", giving us the sentence "she enjoys seeing him walk".

and we know that "gern" always comes after the verb (i think), so if we want to say "she sees him enjoying his walk/walking" we would have to say "sie sieht ihn laufen gern" (i think, am still not sure, maybe go back and take the gern/gerne lesson again)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Revenant

this fairly put a better perspective in understanding this. thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Axel591520

"Sie sieht ihn laufen gern" is not really a German sentence. The position of the "gern" is very awkward. It might be just acceptable in a poem to rhyme with another word:

Sie sieht ihn laufen gern,
von nahe und von fern

But even then the meaning would still be "She likes to see him run". If you want to express that she sees him enjoying his walk, you'll have to use some other construction such as "Sie sieht, dass er gerne läuft".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazen.Sayed

I thought that gerne always comes after verb, such as ich esse gerne. So why (sie sieht dass er läuft gerne) is awkward order?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Axel591520

In German, the word order in subordinate clauses (clauses starting with conjunctions such as "dass", "weil", "obwohl" etc.), in relative clauses and in indirect questions is different from the word order in main clauses. In subordinate clauses the finite verb moves to the final position. All the rest (subject, direct and indirect object, adverbs, infinitives, prepositional phrases) you have to stuff between the conjunction / the relative pronoun and the finite verb.

Main clause:
Thomas läuft gerne am Wochenende mit Linda im Park.
(Thomas likes to run with Linda in the park on the weekend.)
Subordinate clause:
Ich weiss, dass Thomas gerne am Wochenende mit Linda im Park läuft.
(I know that Thomas likes to run with Linda in the park on the weekend.)
Relative clause:
Nein, es ist Thomas, der gerne läuft.
(No, it is Thomas who likes to run.)
Indirect question:
Kannst Du mir sagen, ob Thomas gerne läuft?
(Can you tell me, if Thomas likes to run?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Retromolare

Very good explanation, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AimarOng

There is no "enjoy" in the text


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arnodunstatter

There is only one use of "gerne", so it can't apply to both verbs which are being preformed by different subjects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekSimms

I think that when 'gern' refers to the walker in this case, it comes at the very end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekSimms

But when referring to the person who likes to see him walk, 'gern' comes earlier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cormeistro

Why is it not acceptable to put "She likes to watch him run"? I understand that it specifically says "see", but wouldn't this translate better to "watch," in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeoFlerin

There is a difference of course, but "see" sounds natural too, and has a different meaning. Seeing is like hearing. Watching is like listening. "I like to see you work out" doesn't mean I like to sit there and watch you work out... It just means I like knowing that you're working out, having seen that you're doing it. I expect it's the same in German, which is why "to watch" is not accepted in this context as an equivalent to "sehen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Twolkai

"She likes to see him walk" isn't accepted but "She likes to see him walking." is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K76kUOe4

gives running as an answer but i put she likes to see him run .....not accepted.Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pigslew

Neither "run" nor "walk" accepted. Keep reporting!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

That is now accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Triunn_Maegin

Laufen, earlier in these lessons was taught to mean both run and walk. It was stated, when it refers to run it means more of a fast brisk qalk(like power walking I assume) but thay both run and walk were acceptable translations.

I reported this...

"She likes to see him run" should be an acceptable answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biahopie

And a creepy one (but funny)


[deactivated user]

    This sentence makes NO SENSE whatsoever.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkRowort

    Could this not also be: "She sees he likes walking"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boonjabby

    From what I have learnt, Adverbs (like/gern) go after verbs (see/sieht) and personal pronouns (him/Ihn). Since there is a verb and a personal pronoun it goes after them both. I am not that far along, so I have just accepted that this is the case until I learn otherwise.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Astragus

    In other words, if man wants to say "She sees he likes walking" the translation must be "Sie sieht ihn laufen gern." Is it right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

    No, from what I've seen in the comments it would be Sie sieht dass er gerne läuft. Oh wow I get it now! It's in the pronoun! If you put the direct object ihn, the gern remains with the subject. You have to change the second clause to subject pronoun er to make the gern mean that it's he who likes running.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sprache_Lernen

    I am with @rudgedw on It's unclear to me why gern refers to her seeing and not him walking.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JillyPossum

    Ditto. Regardless of the expectation that adverbs go after personal pronouns, I can't see how gern is linked back to the subject (Sie).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

    I just understood why. It's in the pronoun! If you put the direct object ihn, the gern remains with the subject. You have to change the second clause to subject pronoun er to make the gern mean that it's he who likes running. Sie sieht dass er gerne läuft.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnnyEx

    The word order in the sentence makes no sense. This is what i hate about german. Why can't it be a logical language. Even arabic doesnt have this type of crap. The sentence literally translates to she sees him like running. How am i supposed to know what that means, it's just weird and frustrating as hell


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeoFlerin

    I share your frustration. This issue made me put it on pause and switch to Spanish, temporarily, since Spanish is super easy/intuitive for French speakers like myself. As with all languages, though, you eventually stop thinking about the structure and the sentences make themselves as they come out of your mouth, but that's a long way away and having to deal with such awkward word order is really frustrating and puts me off German a bit.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danilo.Carvajal

    I'd love to see him walking as well :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ethendras

    I got this wrong too and thought it said "She sees he likes to walk" but that would be "Sie sieht, dass er gerne zu Fuß".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pitaconce

    that is what I thought so. gern referred to him running


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Georg638461

    she gladly sees him walking could that be correct ?perhaps after an injury


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeoFlerin

    Regardless of whether that translation (in terms of meaning) is appropriate, it's not in correct English.

    After an injury, you would say "she's happy/glad to see to him walking"

    Whether or not the expression in German could mean that, I'm not qualified to say.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vikram551092

    Why is it not 'Lauft', but 'Laufen'? Plural/singular is irrelevant since we refer to just the action of walking...?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeoFlerin

    It's not the plural form. It's the "infinitive" form.

    Ich kann nicht schlafen. - I am not able to sleep.

    Die Kinder gehen täglich schwimmen. - The children go swimming every day.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeighMulle1

    is "Ihm" him and "Ihn" her? I'm so confused. "Sie" is you and her??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arnodunstatter

    So if this means "she likes to see him run", how would one day "she sees him happily running"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonSaz

    I get that gern goes behind the verb, but why does not go after laufen then? Isn't "ihn laufen" the adverb after which gern should be?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jayceedee

    Is there a reason why it can't be 'she is happy to see him walking' ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor13_

    yeah the order is confusing


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shanna342902

    Why is "she likes to see him run" not correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LloydGunn

    Why is " She likes seeing him walking" incorrect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobynJacks7

    could it also be "she sees he likes to run?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiorgiChom

    How will be translated this: "Sie sieht gern ihn laufen." and this: "Sie sieht gern seine laufen."

    20 Lingots for correct translates :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

    Dude, you posted 3 of these on here. First, please remove, at least, two of them.

    And, if you wish to keep one up, please understand that it appears that your sentences are not properly written, and therefore, cann't be properly translated. If you had followed the discussion, you'll see where the proper placement of "gern" is suppose to be.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiorgiChom

    How will be translated this: "Sie sieht gern ihn laufen." and this: "Sie sieht gern seine laufen."

    20 Lingots for correct translates :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

    Dude, you posted 3 of these on here. First, please remove, at least, two of them.

    And, if you wish to keep one up, please understand that it appears that your sentences are not properly written, and therefore, cann't be properly translated. If you had followed the discussion, you'll see where the proper placement of "gern" is suppose to be.

    Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.