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  5. "Bojíme se tamhleté zvláštní …

"Bojíme se tamhleté zvláštní rodiny."

Translation:We are afraid of that weird family.

September 27, 2017

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fen554820

I think this is in the genitive. If so, why? Is it because of the verb 'bat se'? Thanks in advance :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Yes, bát se uses a direct object in genitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janmunroe

So, I've reported this because I put "We are frightened of this weird family" and it's been marked wrong. In English, you can say both. Both translations should be accepted. Of course, I GUESS you could make the case that it should by "frightened by" but as a native speaker I've heard it the other way my whole life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I would consider "frightened" to be stronger than just "bojíme se".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janmunroe

Interesting. In American English "afraid of", "frightened of" and "scared of" seem to be fairly synonymous and interchangeable. "Terrified of" ratchets it up a notch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I could easily be wrong. You can certainly report the sentence to the system.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katrinkadee

Weird is a word that is commonly misspelled by native English speakers. Perhaps you should just call it a typo if it is spelled wierd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kacenka9

Sadly, or luckily, none of us is small enough to sit inside of the computer deciding with the speed of lightning if a sentence was correct or not. That honor belongs to a computer. It sees one letter off as a typo (unless that typo manages to create another existing word) and two and more incorrect letters as a mistake. WIERD is two letters off. I and E... Extra bonus for English native speakers to improve their native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janmunroe

"I" before "E" except after "C" and when sounded as "A" as in NEIGHBOR and WEIGH. THAT'S how they taught us in U.S. grammar school. Usually with a big stick HOVERING over us too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katrinkadee

That's what I learned, too, but this isn't after "C", nor does it sound like "A." It's just weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janmunroe

I believe it comes from Welsh which may explain the idiosyncrasy. As with Czech, I guess you just have to LEARN those by practice.

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