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"Ga i losin, os gwelwch chi'n dda?"

Translation:May I have a sweet, please?

September 28, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malcolm748758

Earlier translation of the same sentence allows some sweets and sweets. Marking someone wrong for not using a sweet is arbitrary and, without context, wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarali880575

I got marked down as I wrote "Ga i losin, os gweloch yn dda?". What is the difference between "os gweloch yn dda" and "os gwelwch chi'n dda" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Different tenses:

  • gweloch chi - you saw (simple past tense) - this is not used in 'please'
  • gwelwch chi - you see, you will see (present/future tense) which is the form used in 'please'

(Note that this course does not cover the use of the 'future' tense of verbs for 'present' meaning - that is a feature of more formal registers of Welsh except in a very few situations.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisJohn720252

I vaguely remember this phrase from my primary school Welsh some 60 years ago, but I seem to remember it as "aga fi y losin" or something pronounced like that. And "aga fi y amser". Are these alternatives, or is my memory wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue247163

The program does not appreciate the more literal "if it seems good to you" instead of "please"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melinydre

Nope. For us learners, Duolingo emphasizes informal, conversational Welsh. I think it's better for us in the long run. When I visit Wales I hope to be able to speak some Welsh and not sound stilted or formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue247163

True! I was testing the program's flexibility. I think when you visit Wales, they will be pleased that someone made the attempt to learn their language! I'm just interested in learning one of my ancestral tongues.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelizitasS

Losin is a plural form, how can it also be correct as the singular? Diolch for an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melinydre

Cwestiwn dda!

Having not yet visited Wales, I can only offer some suggestions. Perhaps the plural form losin is most commonly used in Wales in the same way we would use "candy"? "Candy" seems to be a sort of collective noun, the name of a group of items, so it would be technically a singular noun that refers to a plurality of objects? Anyway, I would likely say and hear "Do you want some candy?" Or, "Do you want a candy?" Either way, candy is used in both instances, whether I'm referring to one piece or many pieces.

Here are a couple of threads I found:

I don't use the word "losin" in my dialect but I do believe that it is always plural with the singular being "losinen", but I'd get a second opinion on this. Secondly "losin" means "sweets" as in the british word for "candy", I've never seen it used for "dessert" and for that would say "Pwdin".

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/15707681

Wouldn't a single sweet be a losinen, though, rather than losin?

It can be, but a lot of people use losin for the singular and loshins for the plural. You'd probably get a funny look if you said Ga i losinen? in everyday Welsh.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/13218911

Search the Welsh forum for "losin plural" for more interesting threads.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelizitasS

Diolch, have a lingot

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