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  5. "The singer is thin."

"The singer is thin."

Translation:가수가 날씬합니다.

September 30, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseMaes

I got confused for a bit because 날씬 (thin) sounds so similar to 날씨 (weather)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Le_choc

Skinny legends


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alf886345

Why do we have some adjetives followed by 습니다 and others by 합니다?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhin1

Short answer: Some descriptive verbs have citation forms that end in 하다.

You are observing how Korean conjugates its verbs, specifically the conjugation for the formal speech level.

Reference: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ko/regular-verbs/tips-and-notes

Action verbs and descriptive verbs have a citation form which is then conjugated to the appropriate speech level when used. For the formal speech level, we take the verb stem and add -ㅂ니다/-습니다. Note that the additional letters we add depend on whether the verb stem ends in a vowel or consonant.

  • In this sentence, the verb is 날씬하다 ("to be slender") and has the stem 날씬하. Therefore the formal form of this word is 날씬합니다.

  • Contrast this with the verb 작다 ("to be small"), which has the stem 작. Therefore the formal form of the verb is 작습니다.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lang864129

歌手가 나씬합니다


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARMY428663

Yoongi tell me why everybody knows how thin u are


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChineesLee

Isn't 가수가 날씬해 the same as 가수가 날씬합니다?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charmantMode

Yes but 날신해 is casual. 날신합니다 is formal and polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lemiin

Yeah but because we didn't learn that officially, I don't think it counts for this one exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiKomprenasVin

Yes, but they differ in the level of politeness. The former is casual while the latter is more formal and thus more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Park.Taeyeong

It is, 날씬해 is the informal form


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhosyn5

The meaning is the same, but the politeness level is different (the first one is informal).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronwynRic1

what does 그 mean and when do i use it? Does it roughly equate to 'the'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aa_000

It does roughly equate to the and you can use it in multiple instances. 그 Is used when the thing in question is far from the speaker but close to the listener. E.g 그 책은 재미있어요 The book is interesting/fun or 그것은 차가워요 The thing is cold.

There are 2 other variations

이 (The thing is closer to the reader than the listener)

저(The thing is neither close to the speaker or the listener like when pointing out directions)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScarletSheba

Oh why am I fat but the singer is thin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleDelane6

Isn't it weird to have 하다 in a descriptive verb, since it means "to do"? If you're thin then you're being something. What is it that you're "doing"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhin1

Good observation. 하다 only carries the meaning of "to do" when used in verbs (DLG: active verbs). 하다 carries the meaning closer to "to be, to feel, to express" when used in adjectives (DLG: descriptive verbs). Consider these two examples:

  • 피곤하다 = "to be tired" or "to express tiredness" rather than "to do fatigue (피곤)"
  • 슬퍼하다 = "to be sad" or "to act as if (subject) is sad" rather than "to do sadness"

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleDelane6

Thanks. What does DLG mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhin1

DLG = Duolingo. Used here to refer to how Duolingo discusses these aspects of the language. The terminology varies depending on the reference material.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleDelane6

So you consider adjectives to be grammatically different from verbs in Korean? Does the language actually make a distinction between them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhin1

Yes. In Korean there are two parts of speech that serve as predicates to a complete sentence: 동사 (verbs) and 형용사 (adjectives). For example, 공부하다 ("to study") is a 동사, while 피곤하다 ("to be tired") is a 형용사.

As distinct parts-of-speech, these words require different grammatical structures in sentences and affect conjugations.

Some English-to-Korean textbooks use active verbs and descriptive verbs to discuss this distinction. But I find it more confusing since there are already Korean-grown alternatives available.

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