"O que tu cozinhaste?"

Translation:What did you cook?

3/13/2013, 2:47:35 AM

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lucast3

I am brazilian and my friends/relatives never said this phrase in this way to me. It is not wrong, but it is not common, it sounds a strange phrase. I even had difficulties to translate it to English.

The most common is: "O que você cozinhou?".

2/13/2016, 7:44:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ChessStatic
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Thanks for letting us know. I already wondered if it was something that is said in Brazil. I guess it's more a Portuguese phrase then. Obrigado!

2/10/2017, 11:09:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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It's daily Portuguese in certain Brazilian regions, and not used in other Brazilian regions.

3/8/2017, 11:57:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DonatoCali
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Why would it be difficult to translate it to English? It translates the same way "o que você cozinhou?" does.

8/2/2017, 10:35:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
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I actually prefer "tu", the conjugation for the verb is sometimes the same and other time very similar to the Spanish conjugation of "tú". (Spanish is my first language) for example, Portuguese then spanish:

Tu bebes água - Tú bebes agua

Tu comes arroz - Tú comes arroz

Tu cozinhaste - Tú cocinaste

It kind of a pattern if you look at it.

2/3/2014, 12:53:55 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Trenico
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yes, i agree, i am native spanish speaker too and this way is easier, also it sounds less rude

3/14/2014, 3:31:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cloudhorizon

Woah, I'm starting to see why some Brazillians use the same verb conjugations for "tu" as they do for "voce". Present tense with "tu" was easy enough, with mostly just adding an "s" at the end of the verb, but cozinhou becoming cozinhaste? >.>

3/13/2013, 2:47:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Adding -s rule works on present (more than half verbs), everytime u change the tense of conjugation the end also changes.

3/13/2013, 8:35:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/saschambaer
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Almost all forms are the same. Only this form here is really different. The only other ones that are different are the Imperative (-a instead of -e for -ar verbs and the other way around for -er and -ir verbs) and forms that end in a consonant in the 3rd person (in these -er is added).

That's at least what I gather by playing around with http://www.conjuga-me.net

2/15/2014, 1:42:25 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie-da-China

I have the same feeling.-_-

4/22/2013, 7:49:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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And Brazilians feel like that too, don't worry. :p

We barely use "tu", and when we do, we do it wrong. (Some exeptions in the south, northeast and north, where they use this quite well)

12/7/2013, 2:35:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JCMcGee
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Did the Beasty Boys not have an album about this?

3/11/2015, 11:34:47 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Roberto740984
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This has some historical background, Portuguese used to be more cruel than Spaniards or even French with the natives and afroamerican people. i think because of the influence of their relation with England back in the XVIII century. So the use of Tu was almost prohibited because is too familiar. Both Você and Usted came from the phrase "your grace". I even dare to say that "Tu" is only used among brazilians of high European ancestry.

11/29/2017, 5:30:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane
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Foolishness, the African-Americans used to speak Vosmicê, Vassuncê, Vancê. And we get to use você, ocê, cê, because it's so much easier to use você than tu. And verbs without s. Brazilians who still use tu do not conjugate verbs correctly: tu fala, tu vem, tu pega...

11/30/2017, 3:03:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Agent_Gabriel
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7/11/2015, 11:15:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly247113

Im confused about this. I have been learning portuguese for around 9 months and practice with a few friends from Brazil. I have never heard any of them use 'tu', and they are from different regions. Is 'tu' used commonly in Brasil? Ive heard it in Spanish.

5/26/2016, 9:25:08 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane
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Kelly, they say some regions use tu. I've been listening to the radios from these regions and they didn't use tu. Tu becomes an extinction pronoun, like its plural, vós. You can hear "tu vai, tu pega, tu entra" instead of tu vais, tu pegas, tu entras. But we didn't hear Vós ides, vós pegais, vós entrais - you'll hear vocês vão, vocês entram... But listen to this father, you will hear this tu, this very, very popular tu . I'm sure his son is not learning it at school: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfsoiBgfjmk

5/26/2016, 7:25:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dinnernugget
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Not really. I'm surprised they teach it in this course, actually. It's like "egli" in Italian.

8/10/2016, 5:20:57 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/timcupples

o que tu cozinhou? What have you cooked? (in general) o que tu cozinhaste? What have you cooked? (yourself) Is that the difference in meaning between the two?

11/18/2014, 2:10:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu
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Not really. As Danmoller says in an earlier comment, many Brazilians conjugate "tu" as they do "você". That means the real difference between "O que tu cozinhou" and "O que tu cozinhaste" is that the first is wrong (although tolerated in some dialects) and the second is strictly correct.

11/18/2014, 3:08:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaaadz

I think você is more respectful, like Spanish usted and tu is more familiar, something you would use with suoer close friends.

5/23/2015, 12:50:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/sharkbbb
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That's true for Portugal, but not for Brazil, where tu has the same level of formality as você, although it's used much less.

10/17/2015, 12:36:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sueli Angst

Tu cozinhastes

6/22/2014, 12:25:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane
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tu cozinhaste, vós cozinhastes.

7/24/2014, 4:39:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profelevi
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why do we have the tu form in here? unnecessary ...

8/13/2016, 12:27:03 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DonatoCali
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Would it hurt to know it exists? People use it in some regions of Brazil, in all of Portugal and in the Portuguese-speaking countries of Africa.

8/2/2017, 10:34:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoyceHilary

I live in Portugal, so I am always delighted when the occasional tu pops up on Duolingo. I love the conjugations for tu. More, please!

5/22/2018, 10:00:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/todji

Seems like we should know it exists in case we run across it. It's not like Duolingo puts much emphasis on it.

8/13/2016, 3:27:55 AM

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