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  5. "I have your mother's cat."

"I have your mother's cat."

Translation:Mám kočku tvojí matky.

October 3, 2017

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gSee4

Why is Mám kočku vaší matky wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MotixCZ

Because Czech is hard language and it have a lot of types of correct sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pollyhs

... tvoji matky or tve matky?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamie08MD

Both are correct. I would say that "tvé matky" has a little more formal feeling to it, while "tvojí matky" is slightly more colloquial. The difference is minimal, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LrbU10

Can I say Kočura?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

You can certainly say that. But if you're expecting people to know that you're speaking about a cat, then probably don't. I've never seen or heard that word in my life - how did you come up with it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LrbU10

I mistyped the word "Kocour", is it used a lot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

I see. "Kocour" is used when you want to say male cat, tomcat, specifically. Otherwise, "kočka" is the general word for a cat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LrbU10

In Russian it's usually specified if there is a male or female by using words "Kot" or "Koshka" unless you are talking about an abstract cat, not a particular animal. So in Czech do people usually say "Kočka" when they know that it's a male?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

It depends on the speaker. Some poeple just always say "kočka", as an umbrella term for all felines. People who actaully own a male cat will say "náš kocour..." etc. My estimate is that "kot" is used more frequently in Polish or Russian than "kocour" is in Czech.

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