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  5. "Wir trinken."

"Wir trinken."

Translation:We drink.

March 13, 2013

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaronsnoswell

In english, saying 'we are drinking' would colloquially imply 'we are drinking alcohol'. Is this the case with this German phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

It can have this connotation. But without further context, it's not the most natural interpretation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nithila_S.

I was wondering this, too and this helps a lot. I see that you are learning many languages and I have a question; Do most languages interpret their equivalent of "They drink." with drinking alcohol? I know Tamil and English and I know when you are saying someone is drinking alcohol, colloquially, you would say what literally translates to "They are drinking." Also, please excuse any grammar mistakes as I know they are there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/trinken#German -- that makes it look like it's more than just a connotation. So the distinction between intransitive and transitive senses is being lost in German too, while at the same time possibly bleeding over into other language groups?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodrigoEst661574

In spanish has the same connotation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prosto_max

Hmm... In Russian too )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beatr1z

In English there are the simple present and the present continuous. In German how is simple present? Sorry, if I´m asking in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

German does not have a continuous aspect. It's "Wir trinken" both for "we are drinking" and "we drink".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamMcCarty

wataya, why not "wir trinkt"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna694674

Because this is just not the way German verbs are conjugated. "Wir" usually goes with a verb form which looks like the infinitive form, while verb root + t goes with 3rd person singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amin752102

for both Wir and Sie we say "trinken" ? why ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kai_Roberts

The Wir form and the sie/Sie form of a verb are almost always the infinitive form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadlyRainwing

Could someone clarify, why is the ending of the root 'trink' the same for 'wir' and 'sie/Sie'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hohenems

That's just the way it is. Someone learning English could ask why we say "we are", "they are" and "you are".

"Trinken" (the verb "to drink") is a regular verb. All regular verbs get the same endings in present tense. This was introduced in the tips and notes at the beginning of Lesson 1. https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Basics-1

If you memorize the endings, then you're golden for all regular verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenHan74339

Does the male voice in these lessons have an accurate accent to native German speakers? His pronunciation can be very difficult to understand. The woman, on the other hand, is perfectly clear to my ears.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam900833

Why "we drink" is not correct answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thedoctor46super

Why "We drink" was marked as incorrect? Am I missing something? :|


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thedoctor46super

Just realised it was not a translating exercise :F


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MtFJgE

How to pronounce wir? It sounds like via


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TishaButterfly

can we also say we drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milena291677

I mean like, we drink sounds like you are drinking alcholol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GinnySal

How would one pronounce "trinken"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamMcCarty

Why not "wir trinkt"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan646353

See above. The short answer is, it's incorrect and that's just how it is. It's just one of those things you have to memorize. It's always going to be "wir trinken", Sie trinken (plural form of Sie-they) er/sie(singular- she)/es trinkt, du trinkst. Once you memorize them, its not bad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamMcCarty

Thank you, Alan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewRic319956

You probably should stop this drinking problem. Seriously...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raven462888

I keep trying to tell the difference between the different ways to say "drink" and I am struggling. I think trinken is "are drinking" but the others are confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raven462888

Can someone help me on the different ways to say drink? I think trinken is "are drinking" but the others are confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna694674

It seems you are not familiar with the concept of verb conjugation (using a different suffix/verb form for I, you, he/she/it, we, they) – is that your question? If so, please check verb tables in online dictionaries (such as https://dict.leo.org).

This is the conjugation for the verb "drink":

to drink (infinitive) = trinken;

I drink = ich trinke;

you drink (one familiar person) = du trinkst;

he/she/it drinks = er/sie/es trinkt;

we drink = wir trinken;

you drink (more than one familiar persons) = ihr trinkt;

they drink = sie trinken;

you drink (on or more respected/non-familiar person(s)) = Sie trinken (mind the capital S, as opposed to sie = she/they).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JantjeHofj

Sounds like 'Ihr trinkt'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnkarBalajiHande

In English we are having different to be forms But here I got that are drinking and drink are same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M

Yes, the simple present (we drink) and the continuous present (we are drinking). In German, there's only the simple present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodut3

In romanian we usually don't of alchool when we say that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/parkmm

Wir trinken = We drink? I did We are drinking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fironex

The voice sounds like it's saying "ihr" instead of "wir"

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