"Hier slapen elf mensen."

Translation:Eleven people sleep here.

1 year ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Alcaro_cluj

why isn't accepted "here sleep eleven people" ?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Omarbrsli
Omarbrsli
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I realized why after taking the word order lesson , it seems like if you begin your sentence with something like (sometimes , now , here , maybe , ....etc, i dont know what you call them ) the verb should come before the subject .

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amish_dexter

Can we write this like "Elf mensen slapen hier." ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WappyJohnn

Yes you can

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flora_Cheung

Why my answer was marked wrong - "Here sleeps eleven people."?? Please explain.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Hi Flora_Cheung,

It's because 'people' is plural (it's a collective plural noun), so verbs always take the form you'd use for 'they'.

So, for example, we say 'People sleep', or, as the song goes, 'people are people' ;)

Hope this helps.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamNowek
AdamNowek
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Because that is incorrect in English; you used the wrong verb tense ('eleven people sleep', not 'eleven people sleeps').

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ren721047
Ren721047
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I wrote "Here are sleeping eleven people", why is it wrong ?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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It is not grammatically wrong, but it is strange. It is not idiomatic. Eleven people sleep here is the usual word order. You could comfortably use the present continuous with this same word order (Eleven people are sleeping here). The implication is that they are sleeping here now, or for a fixed time - this week, say - but it is not a permanent arrangement. The emphatic word order would be Here sleep eleven people. If I were to put this into a continuous tense, with emphasis, I would probably say There are eleven people sleeping here, but not Here are sleeping eleven people. If I heard that last construction, I would understand it - but I would conclude that it was said by a non-native speaker.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cactus_clock

How is this sentence different in English to the placement of the adverb "Nu" in the English translation of the sentence "Nu wordt het donker". My translation: "It is becoming dark now" was corrected to "Now it is becoming dark". In the present sentence, my translation: "Here sleeps eleven people" was corrected to "Eleven people sleep here". Would someone please explain the placement of the English adverbs, "now" and "here"? Thank you.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Hi Cactus_clock,

Adverbs of place in English mostly are placed at the end of the clause, as Sean Meaney said somewhere when replying to another user who had asked pretty much the same question.

I'm sharing you the link to the website of the Cambridge dictionary, where you'll be able to find load of useful information: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/amp/british-grammar/adverbs-and-adverb-phrases-position

Now, regarding your sentence, I noticed that you used the verb forn that is used with the thirds person singular (She, He, It -S.H.IT. rule), you wrote 'Here sleeps eleven people', when 'people' is a plural noun. Remember that plural nouns require you to use the verb form that you'd use for 'they', so, 'people sleep', or as Depeche Mode's song goes, 'people are people'.

Now, regarding the word order, both versions (the one with subject-verb inversion and the one without it) would be possible when fronting the Locative Adjunct (in this case, the adverb phrase of place). More information on this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subject–verb_inversion_in_English

That being said, and as Sean said, it just sounds too odd and dated to place the adverb of place at the beginning.

Hope this helps.

2 months ago
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