"Er loopt een meisje op straat."

Translation:A girl is walking on the street.

1 year ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Maarith

Why is it just "op straat", and not "op de straat"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
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Good question! It's one of few fixed expressions, which are all very common. They're exceptions, if you will, where you can leave out the article. Some other ones are:

  • Op school = at school
  • Op tafel = on the table
  • Aan tafel = at the table
  • Op kantoor = In/At the office
  • Naar huis = (to) home
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/as2907
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So interesting! In Italian we also have all those fixed expressions without the article, even if the preposition is not always the same.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lettiej123
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To clarify, does this have the same meaning as "Een meisje loopt op straat"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
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Yes, but it's better to start the sentence with "er". In Dutch, we don't like to put an indefinite subject (like "een meisje") at the beginning of the sentence. That would put a weird emphasis on it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/as2907
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On the other hand "there is a girl walking on the street" is also an accepted translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Handrisuselo
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I agree with you!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xin299702

Dat is inderdaad heel interessant, en handig te weten! Dank je, Moos!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeroeAris1

Hi, just one question about ''lopen''.

Here in Belgium, ''lopen'' is used running (not walking) and ''wandelen'' for walking. My dutch teacher confirmed that .

Then why duo says lopen for walking? Is that available for Belgium only?

Thanks for your answer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
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Because in the Netherlands lopen generally refers to walking. Only in a sports setting lopen would be used for running, or in set phrases.

http://vandale.nl/gratis-woordenboek/nederlands-engels/vertaling/lopen

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuiyingLiu

in the street, in

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Yes, op straat = (Am. English) on the street; (Br. English, usually) in the street.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
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Yes indeed. It is odd: in Britain we walk in the street (or up it or down it) but drive along it (or up it or down it). And we drive on the motorway. As our transatlantic colonial friends might say: "Go figure!"

But where do we park??

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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To me at least "walking in/on the street" by default refers to the specific action of walking on the road surface, as opposed to along the side / on the sidewalk (this is the only interpretation of "walk in the street" for me; "walk on the street" I can't quite get my head around at the moment; I doubt I'd use it much)

It looks like "loopt op straat" is much more general than this: http://context.reverso.net/translation/dutch-english/loopt+op+straat

4 months ago
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