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"Ich fahre."

Translation:I drive.

4 years ago

65 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AdamZovits

Would "I travel" be also acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adlihtam
adlihtam
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Yes. Report it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BunBenDl

Ich fahre means I travel as in a daily commute. It also means I drive.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MajdKarnoub

@Adamzovits Yes, I travel is 1oo% accepted ... but there would be distinction when putting the verb into the perfect tense Ich habe gefahren means I have driven Ich bin gefahren means I have travelled

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdentinho
mdentinho
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"Ich bin gefahren" = I have driven, I drove. While "I have travelled" = "Ich bin gereist"

"Ich habe gefahren" is grammatically wrong, nobody says this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herr.Macfarlane

This is not quite correct if you specify what you drove it makes the use of the verb transitive, which in German requires haben.

eg. Ich habe das Auto gefahren. OR Dieses Auto habe ich nie gefahren. - transitive uses; this is quite correct and used.

Alternatively, Ich bin mit dem Auto gefahren. An intransitive use of fahren.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdentinho
mdentinho
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But only if you specify the object. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janus8536
Janus8536
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'I travel' was rejected though. DL wanted 'I drive'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ACardAttack

I don't think so, Germans seem to be very literal, the verb for travel is "reisen"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itaShadd

Synonyms are a thing in German too...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roman2095
roman2095
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"fahren" can also mean "travel" so I tried that ( I travel) and it was not accepted because they put a tricky little period after "fahre". DL said it only means "I travel" if used with a destination e.g. "ich fahre durch Italien". By putting in the period they can say it only means "I drive". Too tricky by half! I have noticed the German lessons are full of tricky little traps like this, unlike the other language lessons I have done so far - so be careful. Whether that is a good thing for learning or not I do not know, but I think being caught by an intentional trap could be demotivating for some people. If there had been no period then either translation would have been OK as it would only have been a phrase and not a complete sentence, and so the "travel" translation would have been OK. Here is a link showing the use of "fahren" to mean "travel" (click on the "travel" button to see only the translations using "travel") http://context.reverso.net/traduction/allemand-anglais/fahren

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siroggak
Siroggak
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Why not "I ride"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siroggak
Siroggak
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I'm not a native English speaker, you could explain instead of downvoting :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ACardAttack

While I'm not the person who downvoted you, I'll explain. When you ride, you aren't really doing an action, you aren't in control. When you drive, you are taking a more active role. I can ride while my wife drives, she is driving, I'm only sitting there.

Hope this helps

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siroggak
Siroggak
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Except for riding a bike, right? Thank you for good explanation!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ACardAttack

Good point, yes, you ride a bike, or other non-motorized devices. Ride a skateboard, surfboard, etc. Drive is really only used for cars, trucks, motorcycle, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
az_p
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You also "ride" a train when you are a passenger. In German this uses fahren.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nubbins01

While that may be the case in German (I don't know), it's not in English. For grammatical purposes, 'to ride' is surely always a verb? I am riding on the bike, I am riding a horse, I am riding in a car. The only case where it wouldn't be is when it's a noun ('Check out my sick ride')

Now, you would never really say 'I'm riding in a car' in English - riding is usually used for objects that you actually sit 'on' rather than 'in' (I'm riding on a horse), although you could say 'I am taking a ride in her car' (not sure if you can use the same kind of construction in German).

Anyway, the point is, verbs aren't always denoting actions where you are active or have control, so not sure how good an explanation the above actually is.

I think more to the point is that while 'to ride' and 'to drive' can overlap, they usually denote different things in English and German, and so 'I ride' in this case is not an accurate translation of 'Ich fahre' . To translate into 'to ride', the sentence would probably have had to say something like 'Ich reite'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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I go should be accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bhankerson
bhankerson
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Yeah, "I drive" implies you're operating the vehicle. Ich fahre literally means "I go" with the implication that you go by vehicle, either driving or riding.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/immery
immery
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Why is I go not accepted? Is it not what fahren means?

I'm not English native speaker, so my understanding of fahren is "go using a vehicle"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
az_p
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Out of context, just translate it as "I drive". It keeps the original meaning better than simply using "I go", which has a much broader meaning out of context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShariniSen

I recently tried that. It is accepted now. Both I go and I travel are acceptable for this from what I know.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ACardAttack

Correct me if I'm wrong, but if was going somewhere by car, I would use fahren to say I'm going there. So if I want to say "I am going to the store" I'd say "Ich fahre zu dem Laden" if I have to drive there, correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danieljvdm

I'm not sure about the fahren/gehen stuff, but your sentence should be "Ich fahre zum Laden", since zu takes the dative case.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herr.Macfarlane

zum and zu dem are exactly the same thing. The former is merely a contraction of the latter.

2 years ago

[deactivated user]

    Hm, we were always taught in school that this meant 'I travel'. Not sure why it isn't accepted here.

    EditDelete3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    az_p
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    That should be accepted, I think. The official German dictionary lists a definition where it means "to make a trip", which is synonymous with "to travel".

    However, technically, "to travel" is reisen. "To travel by vehicle" is fahren.

    I.e. if you go on a hiking holiday you are 'travelling' (reisen) even though you are not 'fahren'.

    Fahren is used for driving a car, being a passenger in a car/bus/train/boat, riding a bike, or even skiing. I think flying in a plane is excluded.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/roman2095
    roman2095
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    See my comment further up for why they do not accept "travel" in this exercise.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Janus8536
    Janus8536
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    What about traveling by boat? In German the correct verb would also be 'fahren', not so?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/SixTwoPro

    I wrote this exactly as the answer shows, including proper punctuation and it marked me down. The "correct" translation was exactly how I wrote it.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/wBoson

    Dont write in English

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mungo2k

    I think "I go/I am going" is correct. "Ich gehe" is also "I go", specifically by foot or under one's own power, but any other form of going, such as driving, being a passenger in a bus or train, would be "I go". "Ich fahre nach Berlin" = "I'm going to Berlin".

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/BabaTova1

    Is there a way to do only those tasks? I find them the ones i learn the most from.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
    mizinamo
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    It's not possible to choose the mix of tasks you are given -- there's no setting that you can influence.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/GothboyUK
    GothboyUK
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    This must be an error as fahre has always meant travel to the people I have conversed with. I wonder if this is another of those Hoch Deutsche things that cause strict translation of words commonly used with other meanings.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/vityachu
    vityachu
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    Can you say this to let people in your car know you are the one who is going to ride, or is this more like letting people know you drive sometimes?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    az_p
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    It depends on the context, as in English.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/extremegamer87

    i put " i am driving" and came up incorrect, can anyone help or is it just a little bug?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MarkWaters5

    In context , to be correct you must describe how you are travelling and in what mode...for example,are you travelling by foot, by pushbike, by motorbike, or by motor car? The safest answer to the question is that you simply travel, for fahren means simply that, with no indication of the mode of travel! I hope this helps. Cheers.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/abdessamed_atef

    Is '' i lead'' accepted?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    az_p
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    That's ich f├╝hre :)

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Worldy09

    Does "fahre" have any connection to the English "far"?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/sarefo
    sarefo
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    no, but it's related to "fare". German "fern" is cognate with "far" (also "forth, further, first").

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoeGirard1

    I am traveling should also he acceptable: Morgen fahre ich nach Deutschland.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    az_p
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    There are a couple of comments already in this thread which explain why "I travel" is unlikely to be accepted out of context in this fragment of a sentence. However, in the context of your fuller sentence (which includes a destination), I agree that it would be an acceptable translation.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Nel_TB

    Difference between "fahren" and "treiben"?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    az_p
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    The verb treiben means "drive" in the sense that "St. Patrick drove the snakes out of Ireland" or "The wind was driving the rain into my face" or "My manager is driving me very hard to complete this project". Not to do with going by vehicle, which is what fahren means.

    I recommend using the online dictionary Pons, as it has examples with context.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/immery
    immery
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    what about "lenken" ? Is it ever used as I am driving a car?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    az_p
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    According to that dictionary I just mentioned, that's more like "to steer" or "to direct" (like the action of turning the steering wheel). The most common is definitely fahren.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MarkWaters5

    Ich fahre immediately translates to "I travel" in English and is perhaps the optimal translation for anyone who has been educated in 'Hoch-deutsch'!

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Herr.Macfarlane

    My Hochdeutsch education translates "Ich fahre" as "I drive/go" best. Travel is more accurately "reisen". The lexical meanings are similar but not the same.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MarkWaters5

    Drive/go is a likely modern iteration... the word fahren undoubtedly precedes the invention of the automobile. Hence my understanding of the word without having a specific utility attached. For "go" I would use gehen, not fahren. Though my German is certainly far from perfect!

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Herr.Macfarlane

    Yes, fahren does predate modern cars. The origin is 'varn' from mittelhochdeutsch, or 'faran' from althochdeutsch, a verb that signified the use of any 'mode of transport'. Lit. "Herkunft - mittelhochdeutsch varn, althochdeutsch faran, urspr├╝nglich jede Art der Fortbewegung bezeichnend" (Duden)

    Your point about 'to go' is valid, but this is where it gets somewhat tricky, because 'gehen' is pretty much always translated into English as 'to go' but 'to go' does not always translate into German as 'gehen'.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/IanStuart
    IanStuart
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    I put I am driving which was rejected. Will report

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
    mizinamo
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    Was this a "type what you hear" exercise or a "translate this German sentence to English" exercise?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MarkWaters5

    Richard... fahren is to travel, one must specify which mode one utilises to do so in German. Eg. beim auto, beim fuss, oder beim fahr-rad, und auch jetzt motor fahr-rad! The funny thing is that a fahr-rad is a bicycle, a motor fahr-rad is a motorbike... and yet fahr-rad translates to English as a "travelling thing". Hope this helps!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Joel_Quebec

    DL didn't accept : "I drive"

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
    mizinamo
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    I'm guessing you got a "type what you hear" exercise.

    In which case you have to type what you hear. If the voice speaks German words, you have to type German words.

    In a translation exercise, "I drive" is accepted.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EzeFiszerm

    Doesn't work. I type the answer and it says its mistaken

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
    mizinamo
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    If it's a "type what you hear" exercise, make sure that you type what you hear, i.e. if you hear German words, you type German words.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/crazytongu

    Does the verb fahre require always an object?or the phrase can be grammatically correct even like that?just subject plus the verb?

    10 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    az_p
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    It doesn't need an object. It can be either intransitive (a verb without an object) or transitive (a verb with an object). You can find this out by looking it up on Pons.com and scrolling down to see all the variations.

    10 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/GeneWhiteh

    I think it is I travel....

    5 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoeGirard1

    How do I unfollow this discussion?

    5 months ago