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  5. "아이가 손으로 먹습니다."

"아이가 손으로 먹습니다."

Translation:The child eats with his hands.

October 8, 2017

106 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohanvanHu

I love it when Korean starts making sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pattmahiney

Lol when is that gonna be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louis568025

I thought it would be "The child eats hand" T_T


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pattmahiney

I said the child eats his hands lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Genesis254339

Same XD but I was like, "that's a whole new level of a weird sentence" so I added the "with his hands"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trinity629133

xDDD haha i swear same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tnW73

아이가 자신의 손을 뜯어먹습니다!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoaAmiiiiii

Lol me too but realized it was impossible


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Literally0Nobody

I mean, dogs sing and animals write messages here, so I'd say it is possible


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.STzLFX

Well thats a pretty good username (iamanarmy)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kat376907

I believe (으)로 means "my means of," so he is eating by using his hands. It's also used when talking about transportation, 자동차로 가요 being " going by car."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jinstaej

I FREAKED OUT BECAUSE I TRANSLATED IT FIRST AS "CHILD EATS HANDS" AND I THOUGHT THEY WERE EATING THEIR HANDS OH MY GOD IM SORRY IM SO SORRY ILL STOP TYPING NOW-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.T.s_Son

For anyone wondering what "으로" means in this context I found this:

으로 is used for words which have a final consonant, and 로 for words witthat a final consonant. (Exception: 로 is still used for words which have ㄹ as a final consonant.)

I. 으로/로 is used for tools/methods/transport with which you do something.

Eg.1 가위로 종이를 잘랐다 = With scissors, I cut a paper. 연필로 그림을 그렸다 = With a pencil, I drew a picture. 활로 사냥을 했다 = With a bow, I did hunting.

link: http://www.learnkoreanlp.com/2008/08/particles_30.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fefe556626

Should the 연필로 be 연필으로 because of the final consonant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b0rfeng99

He stated that ㄹ case is an exception, so it is 연필로.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blakecromar

How were you supposed to know it was "his" hands?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanessa249766

It's actually "The child eats with 'its' hands" since they didn't use 여자 or 남자 to indicate the child had a gender, but I'm sure it could've been his or her.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ananya490822

"Their" hands, not "its".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jinstaej

I typed "the child eats with hands" and it counted it correct, so...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In English. we would normally say "his" or "her" hands, or with a fork, or with chopsticks....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/u24VlZbH

How could you know normally if the child is he or she?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L33shy_moo

If the entire conversation was about a parent's child (that was a boy) and the parent mentions that their child eats with their hands, you would assume that they meant their son. It's all about the context of a conversation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

I might wonder if the child eats with the parents’ hands, but then, yes, I could figure out what they meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

I usually know, but “his” can be used for a hypothetical child.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katharina682153

Was wondering about the same... the male default is well and alive :-/ How about allowing a gender neutral "with their hands" as answer here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexiaBetcher

In most other languages if the gender isn't specified they use him. For example, in french if gender is not specified you use "il" which means him/he


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slothman

Masculin genderising is a habit of the anglosphere. We have a singular, genderless noun for people in "they" or "their", but common practice is to say "he" for no real reason. I think using "he" here should be incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It was not singular for most of its history. This is a recent phenomenon that people want to use “they” and “their” for singular because it is genderless. It might catch on since we use “you” for both singular and plural, but give people time to get used to it. We already have a genderless singular in “its”, so some people may prefer that and it is common to use that for a child whose gender is unknown, although some people get offended if you call their child an it which is simply remedied by telling the gender of the child.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiani713694

They/their have been used to refer to singular people of unknown/unspecified gender for literally hundreds of years and the idea that it's a new 'phenomenon' is a myth popularly used to needless make non-gender conforming people uncomfortable. In fact i'm pretty sure that it wasn't until like the 18th century that prescriptivists started say that it was 'incorrect'. Also y'all know it's demeaning to refer to a human being as an 'it'. source: my degree in languages and linguistics


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaejjang

Doesnt (으)로 mean towards?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SongPhilip

In this context, (으)로 means "by way of / via". A literal translation could be "Child, by hand, eats"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sejimai

bruh i thought the child was eating his hand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mei_CF

I come to the comment section to get information on Korean and I see people fighting over gender neutrality and in another lesson there were comments about US politics, like ?? Those are no relevant here. This forum is about learning korean (specially for beginners), can't we focus on that only? You guys have another places to discuss certain things...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_serenaissance

In class i learned (으)러 instead of (으)로 and 먹어요(and verbs ending in 어요 rather than 습니다 in general) rather than 먹습니다. Is there any difference between the two variations, or are they essentially the same???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lohni2

I don't know about the (으)로, but the difference between 어요 and 습니다 is formality, 어요 is more formal than colloquial, and 습니다 is even more formal. You usually use 습니다 when talking to crowds of people or someone in a higher position than you, also elders.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cameron13070

i don't know about 러 vs 로, but verbs ending with 어요 are the same verbs that you see here, just conjugated in a different form/level of politeness. the verb stems are the same though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andie996556

How do you know the child is a boy... i translated as "the child eats with their hands"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bench1278

How would you know the gender of the child from this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brutalfags

So 으로 means "with"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessabanessa

Right. If it ends with a vowel then you only add 로. It's used to talk about methods, so its not always exactly "with".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alyjaanapa

I wrote "The child eats using their hands" and it marked it wrong. Is there any specific reason why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Duolingo prefers a preposition rather than adding a whole other verb into the sentence in a form that we have not been taught yet, so "with his hands" is the correct answer with the meaning of "by means of". Also, "their" is a plural possessive which could be used with “children” though sometimes people try to use it to mean "his or her".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bunnykoo

Using their here is a way in English to talk about the child when you don't know the gender (which is the case). Although for children, "its" might sound more natural, "their" is totally correct too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophieW124616

How do i know if its masculine or feminine? I put "the child eats with their hands"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xin907089

아이가 인도에서 손으로 먹습니다.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IslaMarieD

I don't see any reason it should be 'his' not 'their' hands :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

手で食べます(sorry i have to)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erica996723

I said "The child with hands eat" XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trippyzippy

Okay where do you get the his from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamoalfons

I said "The child eats its hand"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NellyAnnBu

What makes it male? Why is the child male? That's all I want to know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daKanga

엏 진짜 ;)

이 문장 포럼에서 문법 / 언어 질문을 해주시면 감사하겠습니다.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aibeehhh

"Using his hands" has the same meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victor956623

There is no "his". It should be "the child eats with hands"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That literal translation sounds awkward in English. We would add the possessive adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmb00dmm

손을 먹는다 eat hand 손으로 먹는다 eat with hand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aartaaulia

So hard lOl T_T


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruby845565

I tjough (으) 로 meant from?? Or is that completely wrong omg im so confused agh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelstar.S2

yes, "eats from hands" = "eats with his/her hand" -(으)로 as a preposition can indicate a direction, route, result, ingredient, method, cause, status, time, and much more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Except in English we would never say "eats from hands", we cannot get hung up on which preposition is used for what. as it is always different from language to language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fierymagpie

Why not "The child is eating with its hands"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeron206268

Idk if I be making sense but I guess we should start not taking things literally in Korean -- somewhat reading between the lines


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HARSHITA682465

I AM LEARNING KOREAN JUST FOR BTS AND ALSO INTEREST IN KPOP!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IgorKrechetov

Why 손으로 means "with hands" and not "with a hand"? Shouldn't it be "손들으로" if we want to specify plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AricAdam

Because you rarely use only one hand to eat. Even if only one hand is doing the feeding, the other hand is assisting to hold the plate/bowl/whatever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KindleRous

Korean doesn't really use plurals. Easier for us!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It doesn't really use the plural marker. With the plural marker, then it cannot be singular, but without the plural marker it can be singular or plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrciaPet6

thats not true at all somtimes HAVE TO USE Plurar.....than why is plural is even exist??this is 들


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrcia273184

This have meaning in hungarian we use tgis phrase too it can means that he literalky eats with his hand and don't use forks or spoons it means he is not"polit"... Bye ...Americains...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peas_and_carrots

Oops... Accidentally wrote "The child eats a hand"... o_O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmiArmy

Excuse me. I said "the child eats with it's hands" and I was wrong because it said his. IT IS WRONG TO ASSUME THE CHILD IS MALE! I am just going off the information that was given.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The trouble is that “it’s” means “it is” and the possessive would have been “its.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John406707

The child eat with his hands


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is either “The child eats...” or “The children eat...”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/labelle354184

How do you know when ㄹ = r or l


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HellsRels

In an early lesson, someone mentioned Batchim rules to look up. As far as I understand, ㄹ is R when in the middle of a word. It is L at the beginning and end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blessing389006

Am I correct in saying the main subject of the sentences comes first then the second etc and last the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mattyk.u._

I always have mistakes with En translation ..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klef

How do you know its his hands, not her hands?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Firewall_D

I wrote the kid eats hands. xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaixinchun

'The child eats using hands' dhould be accepted as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NazilaShn

Why his??? No her??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiani713694

i feel like 'the child eats with it's/their hands' should also be acceptable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“The child eats with its hands.” is accepted as correct, but “it’s” means “it is”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiani713694

ok cool, i had entered 'their' hands which was apparently 'wrong'. also 's can be a contraction yes, but is also a possessive :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, the possessive form for “it” is “its” without an apostrophe in English, just as the possessive form for “he” is “his”. The apostrophe s is used for the possessive form on nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yeonji62644

Um. . . ew? Manners sksksksksksksksksk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonyr8669

How do we know this is a boy ? We dont so i put its hands and hmm guess what ..wrong! Reporting this error


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liam_Flaherty

"The child eats with its hands" is wrong, but child is gender-neutral. "Its" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BangBangtanOT7

I really thought it would be "The child eats his hand," nor "The student eats with his hand" this does not make sense :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanna822437

I wrote "The child eats with his fingers". Shouldn't that be correct? I know 손 means hands, but I thought fingers made more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndieEvaa

I translated it too "the child eats with it's hands" since it doesn't state the gender...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marshymathers

It never explicitly states the number of hands he's eating with. (Angry)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daKanga

Hi there, Check out the comment made above AricAdam and KindleRous that help explain this. :)

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