https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Can someone please test and correct my Tinycards about expressions?

Hi,

I started to make Tinycards about expressions, phrases and sayings german/english. My first language is german so I'm rather sure the german site is correct. But I need help with the english expressions.

It would be great if someone could have a look and tell me if everything is correct. I would also like to know if this expression are used this way or if they sound awkward to a native speaker.

I'm grateful for any corrections and suggestions for improvement. I want to erase the mistakes and flaws in these cards before I continue.

https://tiny.cards/decks/2e18cca1-2b1f-4672-adc1-f068e7df0c28

Thanks a lot for your help.

Angel

Edit: If you want to know which cards are also planned. Please have a look here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/24693037 and here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/24686593

October 9, 2017

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/christian
October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hallo Christian,

thank you very much for your comment. I really, really wasn't aware of that. Normally I'm not that kind of ignoring idiot. I know about the unspeakable claim from the other camp but not that. Can't even remember I learned that at school. I'm very embarrassed. My apologies. I deleted that card.

I only know and use this phrase in an innocent context. A man with pink trousers is walking a long the street and I say to my mate. "jedem das seine" or "wenn's schön macht" shrug and go on. That't why I chose it.

It was not my intension to spread old nazi parlance.

best regards Angel

October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ondtogviltonsket

Hullo,

Sorry, but I'm really really curious... What is the connotation about jedem das seine ?

Arbeit macht frei has the same such a connotation ?

I searched on the internet and I found that

What does it mean ?

October 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Onsker,

it's a kind of joke. Maybe you can understand it like: everybody can have its part and I want the rest of it (the most I can get) of f.e. money, luck ect.

As I wrote to Christian. I only know this phrase used snippy and when people slagging someone or you use it when you are amused about a behaviour, a look or something like that.

After the shock I had when I read Christian's advise and the links I asked around at family and friends. Nobody was aware of the dark history this phrase has. There is actually a gap in our education.

best regards Angel

October 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ondtogviltonsket

Thank you Angel for explaining it to me!

So basically Arbeit macht frei - Can one use it without holding back or without reservation, right... ?

October 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Jordan,

No. Anybody who learned about the "das dritte Reich" wouldn't. It's cynical and full of discust and hate. We (in Germany) learn that at school. We (I can say that for me and my family/friends) didn't learn that about "Jedem das Seine". That is a gap and a shame.

best regards Angel

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamOfFlying

Sorry this isn't related to the topic but I didn't write it down before I lost the last discussion. So could you say what you learn all your life (or something like that) is in German again.

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Gregory,

Sure. The german phrase is "Man lernt ein Leben lang." you can also say "Man lernt nie aus." Means you never get finish learning.

best regards Angel

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamOfFlying

Thank you :)

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

Don't you dare: Correct. Don't mention it: Correct. Now of all times: Correct. Each to their own: Correct but I don't hear it very often. I'm Australian and pretty much no one uses it here but maybe in den USA. Whatever: Correct. One thing I would suggest is to never use 'Each to their own'. It seems a bit rude. Also 'Don't you dare' would be better worded with 'Please don't do that' or 'I would prefer if you didn't do that' or 'I don't think this is the best course of action'. But Australians have a reputation of beating around the bush so maybe benutz it in some countries.

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamOfFlying

Actually, we do tend to use the "Each to their own" but it is usually a little different, like 'every one to their own'. "Don't you dare" and 'Please don't do that' are actually totally different. Don't you dare" is used in a harsh tone, for example if you got into a fight with your brother, then he started to take your apple, you would use the "Don't you dare". Please don't do that is in a softer tone, for example, if your friend started to ride his dirtbike on the lawn, you would say "Please don't do that". The more neutral way of saying it would be 'Don't do that'. Anyhow, all your others were totally correct especially the "Don't mention it". Hope this helped :)

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Gregory,

Thank you very much for your reply.

I'm aware of the tone. Your example with brother/friend is very good.

The question for me is, is it apparent when you look at the design of the card or do I have to make it more clear?

I noticed, I forgot the smileys at "Jeden das Seine / Each to their own". I fixed that.

best regards Angel

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamOfFlying

From what I saw, they all seemed pretty good. There was just one that I couldn't place what the face should be, and that was the "Each to their own". Also the one that Was a little bit wrong was the "Whatever". I mean, we use it all the time, it's just that the expression of the face could be more like Rolling eyes instead of an angry face :) I'll have to look into the rest of them tomorrow because I only had time to do the first lesson.

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Cluney,

Thank you very much for your answer. :-))

Germans like to use this expression "Jeden das Seine / Each to their own" so I think I put it in more for them than the english speakers^^

I know the expressions are rather gruff and rude. I tried to express that with the smileys and grafity around. But when the design is not clear enough I will redesign it of course.

"beating around the bush" / "um den heißen Brei reden" thanks for this example. Is noticed.

best regards Angel

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

Ok I just went on to the next one. With that I'm at daggers drawn: Never heard this sorry. Be interested in DreaOfFlying's experience but no. He managed that in a twinkle of an eye: I don't normally hear that but it is technically correct. I really can't keep up with that: Yep. Good. Oh put a sock in it: Never heard. Cheer up: Sehr gut! I hope that helps!

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Cluney,

yes, it helps a lot! "put a sock in it" is british. There is a flag. I will make it larger, thank you. If you know an american or australien equivalent, please tell me. Maybe "shut up" but I'm not sure if it really means "Halt die Klappe" or has a more rude tone than that.

best regards Angel

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

Oh righteo. So what does 'put a sock in it' mean cause I may be able to make an equivalent then if I can think of one. Shut up is not very politically correct. It's normally used in a very demanding tone. An example is in a movie I watched it went something like 'We can't shoot no cop man' 'Shut up man, you'll do what I tell you to do'. So you see the urgency of the situation. It can be used in common talk but personally I wouldn't suggest it unless the situation is dangerous or you don't want someone to give something away

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

Sorry silly me I didn't get it. If someone just keeps talking or interrupts you can say 'hold on'. Also Shut up in the situation I stated.

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
Mod

    "Put a sock in it" is fine (said as another Australian). As with all idiomatic expressions their usage varies widely. In parts of the US they may very well say "Shut yo' mouth!", for example. "Hold your tongue!" is another alternative.

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

    Hi AZ,

    thank you. Hold your tongue! is indeed a good alternatve. It's in my "to-do" list.

    The translation of "shut up" into german is a never ending story (in my opinion). In many films it is translateted as "Halt's M***!" But in my opinion this is much more rude than "Shut up" Many germans are mixing up this expressions so I prefer not to use it for the cards. As I wrote I'm not really sure about the tone of this phrase. But if anybody has a good translation and a good explanation this would be great.

    best regards Angel

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/DreamOfFlying

    Actually, I've never heard anyone say "Shut yo mouth!" We usually just use Shut up. I'v never said 'Shut up' when I was talking to a person because it has a more derogative meaning. Usually we use 'Be quiet' although if you wanted to use a idiomatic expression, you could say "Put a lid on it".

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

    Hi Gregory,

    There are many ways to shut someone up in both languages. From very polite to deragative and offending. But what tone has the phrase in the language, that is the question.

    Put a lid on it sounds good. I didn't found it during my research. How would you rank this phrase? snippy, groff but still acceptable? And is it more used in one country or in english in general?

    Thank you very much for your help. I really appreciate that.

    best regards Angel

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

    ok. I don't hear it. But then I may just have not heard someone use it before.

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/DreamOfFlying

    : "With that I am at daggers drawn" I totally could understand it but I'v never heard it before, It's probably a British thing to say. : Cheer up! is spot on. : Don't mention it! is correct, and the expression of the face is closest to what I can think of. : He managed that in the twinkle of an eye! is technically correct, it's just not usually said like that. We usually say it in a more bland, or less profound, like 'He did that in the blink of an eye. Also, the facial expression could be more of an astound look. : Oh, put a sock in it", "You can wait until hell freezes over!, "Stuff it!, "At the drop of a hat!, "Jump in a lake", and "I vouch for you" I've never heard these before and I don't know what they mean, so I can't help you with those, although, I presume Jump in a lake might mean something like 'Simmer down! : Now you're talking! is correct, we just usually skip the g at the end, than it sounds like "Now you're talkin. : You can bet your life on it! is correct. : Now of all times! is correct also. Hope this helped :)

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

    Ok third: Stuff it: correct. Now you're talking: Correct but can also be used in a bad or good situation here's a few examples. 'Where did you put the dynamite', Said the gang leader, 'I won't tell you', said the man, 'I know where you live', said the gang leader, 'OK, it's in the car', said the man, 'Now you're talking' said the gang leader.'. So you see it was threatening that time and when he finally gave up the information it was used. Another example is say two friends are discussing what to play then one suggests something they both like then the other might say 'Now you're talking' so in that case it is friendly... At the drop of a hat: I've heard this before but I don't know what it means so I assume it's correct but you may wanna check it. Jump in a lake: I've never heard this but it may be correct. You can wait until hell freezes over: Yep, hell never freezes over so it pretty much means you're gonna wait forever. Correct.

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/wickie-hey

    Hallo RedAngel666! Ich habe die Übung auf tiny.cards gerade gemacht und finde das Design super. LG Petra

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

    Hallo Petra,

    freut mich wieder mal was von Dir zu lesen.

    Danke schön. Freut mich, wenn sie Dir gefallen :-)) Hoffentlich bringen sie auch inhaltlich was.^^

    Da kommt noch einiges mehr. Ich hatte selbst eine lange Liste und hier im Forum noch sehr viele Vorschläge dazu bekommen. Redewendungen sind auch in Planung.

    viele liebe Grüße Angel

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/davidcwalls

    These are great! Nice artwork, and I like that you describe the emotions that might go along with the expression.

    I am not sure about "At the drop of a hat" being enraged or hopping mad. In the north-east US where I live, we use that phrase in a very neutral way to mean a person would do something immediately and with little encouragement. For example: "I need someone to take care of my cats while I am away; should I ask Jenny?" "Sure, she loves cats, she would do it at the drop of a hat". But perhaps it is used differently elsewhere.

    I also have a question about the "Jump in a lake" card - I can read one of the emotions, but I can't read the one near the top of the card (in either English or German). What does it say?

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

    Hi David,

    thank you for your answer. I'm really glad you like them. :-))

    "At the drop of a hat" Yes, we use it sometimes like you discribed it. But more often we use it when we tired of something and feel angry.

    "Räum Dein Zimmer auf! Und zwar auf der Stelle!" (clean up you room! And this at the drop of a hat!) Everyone heard that when he was a child at least here in Germany^^. But of course I will keep that at the back of my mind and if more english native speaker agree with you I will change it.

    "Jump in a lake" The words are schroff/groff. I will change the typography to make it better readable. Thanks for your hint.

    I started this project because this kind of sayings and expressions make a language colourful alive and unique. But you need a native speaker to learn and to comprehend it. A dictionary is rarely helpful in that case. So thank you for your advices.

    best regards Angel

    October 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

    I wouldn't say 'At the drop of a hat' in that way but you better check with someone cause I said some things that I've never heard but others obviously have.

    October 11, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Margaret287230

    Hi, David's example above is a perfect example of the way we use "drop of a hat" in Australia. ( at least by those of us who have been born and raised in Australia)

    October 11, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

    Hello Margaret,

    thanks for your hint. Maybe I make a second card with a much friendlier design. Or I will use only a friendly card. I think about it.

    best regards Angel

    October 11, 2017
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