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  5. "운동하는 남자는 물이 거의 없어요."

"운동하는 남자는 물이 거의 없어요."

Translation:The exercising man has almost no water.

October 13, 2017

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anon0311

A native Korean speaker says this is a very strange sentence. Koreans would be much more likely to say, "the man is very thirsty," or "the man needs a lot to drink." Personally, as a physician, I would say, 남자가 탈소 상태 예요.
[man] [dehydrated] [state] [is]. The man is dehydrated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbedpython

Is the implication of this sentence that the man is dehydration or thirsty? When I read it, I thought it meant something like his water bottle is almost empty. Is that too literal a translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItsSejong

It seems the native speaker misunderstood the sentence. The meaning of this sentence is 훨씬 different from what the native speaker specified.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaphaelNing

Dehydration is 탈수 (脫水), not 탈소.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norahs60

what about 'the exercising man has barely any water'? is this not quite correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manuel.tha

i gave the same translation as you, and it wasn't accepted..i don't see how it differs from "almost no"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanieP839482

"Hardly any" means the same as "almost no" and is more natural English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ling.ko

"The exercising man has little water." seems to be OK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charley_Charley

Currently "The man who exercises has almost no water" isn't accepted. Should it be added?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anon0311

No, because as written the sentence uses exercising as a adjective, which I think is the point of the exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdharper

I put the samething down and it was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamantaDo

I thought the phrase was on water that falls on the exercising man ahahahah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richi946080

The man doing exercise ... Why is this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doug667703

The check on what is correct is not very correctly. What is the difference between this correct answer and "The exercising man has hardly any water?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YutubPlzSu

Nobody: Absolutely Nobody: Not even a single soul: The Duolingo Owl: Adds chu in the selection


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soccermom98

Why the two 는s together on the word exercising and man?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanieP839482

Hi, The first 는 modifies the verb 하다 and turns it into an adjective "that/who exercises" or "exercising". Notice that the verb comes before the noun 남자. The second 는 denotes the topic of the sentence - man. The 는 on 하다 thus has a different function from the 는 on 남자. I hope this helps. Native Korean speakers, please correct me if I have misunderstood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soccermom98

Thank you, it helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zazyl8

The sentences are strange and mad so i can't learn this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulJones279857

The man exercising has almost no water. - this is how I could say it as a native english speaker.

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