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  5. "The dog comes home."

"The dog comes home."

Translation:개가 집에 옵니다.

October 16, 2017

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slKv6

Why "집애" and not "집애서"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArabicMusi

Because the dog comes TO home not comes FROM home


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mas925

why not 개가 집으로 옵니다 then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CX948

The dog may be coming towards he house, but 까지 makes a limit for it in the sentence, meaning the dog comes only up to the house. (If you have seen the Tips and Notes in the 듀오링고 website for verbs, then you would see details for 까지 and others.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mari.__.mama

-으로 means towards I believe and we have to follow the sentence translation literally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

In this case 집에서 would mean "comes from home" as in going somewhere else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tobin2017

The verb comes last.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/file59

Wouldn't "개가 집에 갑니다" work here too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThePletch

That means "the dog goes home" - you want to use 오다 instead of 가다 to mean "to come"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrigo545800

Doesn't 입니다 mean 'to be'? Why does that make sense here? Does the 에 particle change the meaning of 입니다?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lingen4

It's 옵니다 (오다 infinitive) , "to come", not 입니다.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThePletch

~에 is a locative particle - here it means "to," literally "the dog comes to the house"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohamedFathy007

Does the verb always come last?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CX948

"집" is house, so how does a sentence specify that it's one's home?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoesCathbert

If you wanna specify someone's house then you can use [someone's name]의 집. Ex: Sungjae's House can be translated as 성재의 집.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngela781016

I dont get the difference between 에, 에서, 까지, and 으로. Pleaaassee help mee


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcana01

Im sorry if im wrong, please downvote if I am but

Instrumental: 에 is basically "IN" Destination: 에 can also mean "TO"

Instrumental: 에서 is "AT" Destination: 에서 can also mean "FROM"

Instrumental: 으로 is "WITH" but not literally. Its something u use if u talking about a specific thing as an instrument example "손" (hand). You wanna talk like ur using your hand right? So you add "으로" making it "손으로" (by hand)

Destination: 으로 can lso mean TOWARDS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nithy55443

1.in 2.in the 3.upto 4.to I think!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anu967253

I wrote the same answer and it still marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarryStyle265990

whats the difference between -까지 and -에


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lemiin

Apparently the first one is towards/up to (meaning the dog will stop at the house) and the second one is to (meaning full destination).

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