"You have trousers."

Translation:Ihr habt Hosen.

October 16, 2017

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

What is wrong with Sie haben hose? It doesn't specify how many pairs of trousers.

October 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
  • Hose has to be capitalised (because it's a noun)
  • it would have to be Sie haben eine Hose with the indefinite article eine before the singular countable noun Hose.
December 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/M.parlange

They don't accept «du hast eine Hose» Reported

March 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Show me a screenshot, please.

Du hast eine Hose. is one of the accepted translations, so if it wasn't accepted for you, I can't say why without seeing what you saw.

March 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/M.parlange

Sorry, mizinamo, but I don't know how to come back to my answer.

March 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/M.parlange

Ok

March 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Next time something like this happens, then :)

March 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidBertsche

Yes, I agree "Du hast Hose" should also be correct. Trousers is a plural noun in English, but singular in German. Just like sunglasses and scissors.

October 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

No. Just as we don't say "You have shirt" or "You have hat".

Singular countable items need some kind of determiner in front of them, such as an article.

December 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkGreenMenace

But your reply doesn't answer the question. The point is not only that quantity is unknown, but also that there are some translation difficulties related to the fact that in English a plural sounding "pants" actually equals one item of clothing. In English, we do in fact say "You have pants" or "You have trousers."

Is "Sie haben (or Du hast) eine Hose" an accepted translation? Because the english sentence is ambiguous in whether it is plural or singular.

February 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Yes -- Sie haben eine Hose is accepted as well as Sie haben Hosen, and the same for the subjects du hast and ihr habt.

February 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jjones996997

It looks like it works the same as in English. In other words, with an inherently plural noun, you can have one of them or you can have several.

For example, if you went into a shop and said to your friend, "Sie haben Hosen" (They have trousers) you would be saying they have more than one item.

However, if the shop had just had a hugely successful sale and was about to close for the day, you might instead say "Sie haben eine Hose" (They have a pair of trousers), meaning there was only one item remaining.

You'd never say "They have a trouser" or "They have a pant", the noun is always plural in form, you use the indefinite article "a" or the definite article "the" with "pair of" to indicate the singular.

You could also say in English "The pair of pants" (one), or "The pairs of pants" (more than one) - the indicator of quantity is the plurality or not of the word "pair". The plurality of "pants" describes their inherent nature, two "tubes", or dare I say "hoses", of cloth functioning as a single entity. They cannot be divided and still be that entity. They (plural) are one (singular).

As had been mentioned already, other words written as plural where the plurality describes the inherent, indivisible nature, and not the quantity, are scissors and sunglasses. You can also add God to this list. Unlike us, Our Creator's nature is inherently plural (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) but He is One being. In the original Hebrew, right from the first line of Genesis 1, the word we translate as God is plural: "Elohim", but the related verb "created" is in the singular form in Hebrew, indicating a single entity with inherent plurality.

I wasn't expecting to gain this understanding of the Trinity and German and English grammar today, but I enjoyed the discovery and hope you do too.

April 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kobnach

Thanks. The new feature of only showing the "best" answer left me thinking that the only 'correct' answer was "Hosen". Because "best" in this case is the ihr form - "you (all) have trousers"

November 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Yes - that feature has advantages and disadvantages.

November 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanWray

It's impossible to tell from the English sentence given (You have trousers") whether we are referring to one person, many people, one pair of trousers or many pairs of trousers. It makes perfect sense in English to say "You have trousers" if referring to one pair.

December 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Yes, of course, and translations that refer to one pair of trousers are also accepted.

December 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GrubbaFong

No, they are not. Mine was marked incorrect for "Du hast Hose".

August 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Hose is countable, so if you just have one pair of trousers, you have to say Du hast eine Hose.

Du hast Hose is as wrong as "You have pair of trousers" or "You have shirt".

August 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewHoll656711

In previous examples "Ihr" was "You all". Here, how was I supposed to tell if "you" meant "Ihr" or "Du"?

March 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

In previous examples "Ihr" was "You all".

Only in the sentences added by the Pearson team -- unfortunately, though they were intended only for their own course using the Duolingo platform, they were visible in the public course as well. Hopefully this will be remedied at some point and the Pearson sentences split out from the public course.

Here, how was I supposed to tell if "you" meant "Ihr" or "Du"?

You cannot, and so both answers are acceptable -- both Ihr habt Hosen. and Du hast Hosen.

March 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CelloHead

So, I could have translated it as "Du hast eine Hose" -(singular) You have (singular) pants- as opposed to "Ihr habt hosen" -(plural) You have (plural) pants- and it would've been correct? That's all I need to know.

February 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Yes.

Or even du hast Hosen (you, one person, have several pairs of pants) or ihr habt eine Hose (you, several people, together possess one pair of pants).

February 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ancepsinfans

I guess the logic here is that we’re using plural you, so there are multiple people and thus multiple pairs of trousers?

Unlike others in this thread, my task was German->English translation, but the opposite would be very difficult to get correct.

December 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/amfitrite

The English sentence doesn't show clearly whether a singular or a plural form should be used

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

That's true, and that's why both alternatives -- with eine Hose, singular, and Hosen, plural, are accepted.

Du hast Hose is not, of course, just as "You have shirt" or "You have hat" would not be acceptable. Countable objects in the singular almost always need a determiner of some sort in front of them, such as an indefinite article.

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TalRisin

Is "Sie haben Hosen" also acceptable?

April 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Yes, Sie haben Hosen is fine, too.

April 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Frank718718

When do you know to use habt as opposed to haben, or another?

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AbunPang
  • ich habe
  • du hast
  • er/sie/es hat
  • wir haben
  • ihr habt
  • sie haben
October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
Mod

    There are three forms of "you" in German: informal singular (du), informal plural (ihr) and formal (Sie). They each conjugate verbs differently - kind of like how you have "I am" but "you are" or "he is", each of the three "you"s need a different form of the same verb. For haben, this corresponds to du hast, ihr habt and Sie haben. You can look up the conjugation of any verb on verbix.com or canoo.net.

    October 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/wilsh

    trousers are singular I am wearing singular pair of trousers, more to the point no one has used the singular trouse since 1900

    December 19, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/deepbandivadekar

    When do we use Du and when to use Ihr!? These cases are very confusing.

    January 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    Use du when speaking to one person that you know well.

    Use ihr when speaking to several people that you know well.

    January 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ShannonCoo952225

    Trousers is both plural and singular english so Du hast Hose should also be correct.

    April 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    No. Du hast Hose is not correct.

    Hose is a countable noun in German, so in the singular, you need an article: Du hast eine Hose.

    Du hast Hose would be like saying "You have shirt" or "You have hat". That doesn't work -- it has to be "You have a shirt" or "You have a hat".

    April 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ZyroMess1

    Because of this YOU in english where you don't know if it's single or plural i hate english.

    September 2, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Robbadob

    It could be much simpler if we just decided on a plural you, like y'all/you all/you guys, for ihr and used you for du or Sie.

    December 30, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    English already has a plural you: it's "you".

    It's the singular you, "thou", that got lost :)

    December 30, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/THEW1LD0NE

    Why isn't 'Du hast Hosen' correct.

    October 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Yomalyn

    "Du hast Hosen" was accepted for me :-)

    November 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/jamesmoni

    Why habt and not hat?

    October 24, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    Because the verb form for the subject ihr is habt.

    hat is for er, sie, es.

    October 24, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kobnach

    Duolingo at its best. du hast Hose is rejected; ihr haben Hosen is correct. OK, "you" in english only translates - in this one instance - as plural. Or maybe not; maybe there's a "du" answer I don't get to see, where the single person has only one pair of pants/trousers - which would, I believe be Hose. not Hosen. It's no more plural than the german word for "eyeglasses" is plural - when referrign to a single pair. OK, maybe the "native speaker" who wrote this meant "you have (a great big stack of) trousers. That's not obvious from the English, but neither is the idea that - for this one question - the english word "you" only refers to the 2nd person plural pronoun.

    I absolutely cannot tell what the error is 1) the person creating it thinks "you" is always plural 2) the person creating it thinks "trousers" refers to multiple pairs - a single pair, would, in their mind, be "trouser" :-( 3) I'm actually wrong, and "Hose" can never be used for a single, pair of pants - in spite of what I find in Langsceidt's New college dictionary, German-English section.

    I reported as "the answer I gave should be marked correct", but what a useless exercise.

    This new "improvement" of only showing the "best" answer really sucks. Especially one 2 or 3 answers are equally good (du, Sie, and ihr in this case), let alone where the the author's definition of "best" seems unnatural - I rarely hear "you (several people) have trousers" - it's much more common to talk about a single individual's clothes AFAICT.

    Reason 9682 why I don't pay for duolingo plus - it's just not got sufficient quality control, and too frequently makes major changes that break previously useful material.

    [read the discussion below, after typing this - I did wonder about whether an article might be required, when typing my answer - but once I'd been told that I was supposed to use "Hosen", I completely forgot about that possibility. And if I weren't equipped with a dictionary, and a fair amount of self confidence, I'd probably have "learned" from this correction that it's no more normal to ever say "Hose" than it is to say "trouser". ]

    November 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Yomalyn

    In this translation Duo accepts all three versions of "you", as well as the singular for pants: Hose. This has been explained by the Mods in several places on this discussion page.

    There is no mistake on Duo's behalf here, but a common mistake for learners is forgetting to use an article in front of the singular form of Hose. (We tend to translate word-for-word and there is no article in front of English "pants", however it IS necessary in both languages for singular countable nouns. Directly quoting mizinamo (MOD):

    Du hast Hose would be like saying "You have shirt" or "You have hat". That doesn't work -- it has to be "You have a shirt" or "You have a hat".

    Compare this with another Duo sentence: "Er trägt einen Hut.". Note the article in front of a singular noun. You can see that we are making the mistake because of our English-tendencies. We need to think of "Hose" as "a pant" and translate accordingly--> "eine Hose".

    I'm not saying Duo is perfect and free from error... but in this case, many people have made this same mistake, and it has been explained several times by the ever-so-patient MODs and contributors that you are so passionately claiming to be incorrect. (Huge thank you to them for providing us with FREE education and helpful answers!!!)

    November 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    I did wonder about whether an article might be required, when typing my answer - but once I'd been told that I was supposed to use "Hosen", I completely forgot about that possibility.

    Duo's corrections can never replace those of a real thinking human.

    In general, it seems to prefer corrections that do not change the number of words in a sentence, so it opted to change the incorrect Hose to Hosen rather than to eine Hose (adding a word).

    Similarly, it seems to prefer corrections that keep earlier words the same, so someone translating "the cat" as der Katze may get corrected to der Kater (the tomcat) rather than to die Katze, as if Duo thinks that the user got the article der right but "misspelled" Kater as Katze, rather than the user getting the article of Katze wrong.

    Alas.

    I highly recommend getting a real human teacher if you can find a good, affordable one.

    November 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/AKWeb

    I'm still struggling with knowing when to use 'ihr' and 'du'. Does anyone have any advice?

    January 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Yomalyn
    • "ihr" is used when talking to more than one person. If it helps, you can think of it as "You all."
    • "du" is used for talking to just one person in a familiar/casual way. This is not appropriate for strangers, bosses, teachers, etc.
    • "Sie" (with a capital 'S') also means "you" and is used for talking to one person in a formal/respectful way. ... I know you didn't ask about "Sie", but it's good to know since we're on the topic :-)

    When translating "you" from English to German on Duo, you can take your pick from the three. There will only be one answer on the discussion page, but all forms are equally correct without context. Duo will accept du/Sie/ihr as long as you used the corresponding form of the verb. For example, "you have":

    • du hast // Sie haben // ihr habt
    January 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/KingArthur779082

    Too vague. Not clear in my mind

    January 24, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Gail616867

    OK, I get that I could have put "du hast Hosen", but when is "Hose" ever used, if it means "pant"? Can anyone give an example for me please?

    February 1, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    when is "Hose" ever used, if it means "pant"?

    It doesn't mean "pant".

    The word "pants" is always plural in English, similar to "spectacles/glasses" or "scissors" or "binoculars".

    But in German, you have Hose, which refers to one pair of pants, and Hosen, which refers to multiple pairs of pants.

    Just "pants" can be either (eine) Hose or Hosen, depending on how many you're talking about.

    For example, "I like those pants you're wearing right now" would be Ich mag die Hose, die du gerade trägst, but "I bought some pants yesterday" could be either Ich habe gestern eine Hose gekauft or Ich habe gestern ein paar Hosen gekauft depending on how many pairs you bought.

    February 1, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/georgie885117

    Why not, Sie haben Hose, polite formal?

    April 16, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    That would be like saying "You have pair of pants".

    It doesn't work; Hose is countable, like "pair", so in the singular, you need a determiner before it (such as an article).

    Sie haben Hosen and Sie haben eine Hose work as translations of "You have pants" -- the first one says that you have multiple pairs of pants, the second that you have one pair of pants.

    April 16, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/georgie885117

    I understand now, thank you very much for your clear explanation.

    April 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/georgie885117

    Still confused about knowing what the English , 'you' is in this sentence? It could be , Sie , pl or du , informal or have i missed something?

    April 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    It could be Sie (formal, singular or plural), ihr (informal plural), or du (informal singular).

    All three will be accepted as long as you use the appropriate verb form that matches the subject you choose.

    April 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/teacher946250

    the use of the Du form is also correct in English. Unless you identify the plural "you" as "you all."

    Thus, the given correction is incorrect as the only option.

    May 13, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    the use of the Du form is also correct in English.

    What do you mean?

    "du" is a German word, not an English word.

    What is a "Du form" supposed to be in English?

    the given correction

    What do you mean with that?

    Nobody can see what you see, so please always quote entire sentences -- e.g. the full text of a correction or the complete text of your answer. Please do not just quote individual words as often the problem is not with one individual word but with word order or the gender of an article or adjective elsewhere in the sentence.

    as the only option.

    Nearly all sentences (including this one) on Duolingo have multiple correct answers. Sometimes thousands of correct answers.

    In a correction, you will usually only be shown one of the correct answers - but that doesn't imply that there is only that one.

    May 14, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/AnitaVandi2

    In English it is impossible to know if "you" is singular or plural. So I think that "du hast Hosen" is also correct. Nevertheles it is marked incorrect.

    April 2, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

    Nevertheles it is marked incorrect.

    That would surprise me, since du hast Hosen is one of the listed alternatives.

    Can you show me a screenshot, please?

    April 2, 2019
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