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  5. "You have trousers."

"You have trousers."

Translation:Ihr habt Hosen.

October 16, 2017

257 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreasaWilson

What is wrong with Sie haben hose? It doesn't specify how many pairs of trousers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBertsche

Yes, I agree "Du hast Hose" should also be correct. Trousers is a plural noun in English, but singular in German. Just like sunglasses and scissors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No. Just as we don't say "You have shirt" or "You have hat".

Singular countable items need some kind of determiner in front of them, such as an article.

So it would have to be Du hast eine Hose. / Ihr habt eine Hose. / Sie haben eine Hose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkGreenMenace

But your reply doesn't answer the question. The point is not only that quantity is unknown, but also that there are some translation difficulties related to the fact that in English a plural sounding "pants" actually equals one item of clothing. In English, we do in fact say "You have pants" or "You have trousers."

Is "Sie haben (or Du hast) eine Hose" an accepted translation? Because the english sentence is ambiguous in whether it is plural or singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes -- Sie haben eine Hose is accepted as well as Sie haben Hosen, and the same for the subjects du hast and ihr habt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gunny937305

May is know when to use T at end and when to use St at end ,eg habt hast ,geht gehst ,trägt trägst ,bringt bringst ,pls explain


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Joy

Ihr habt die Hose My mistake was in using grammar for French, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjones996997

It looks like it works the same as in English. In other words, with an inherently plural noun, you can have one of them or you can have several.

For example, if you went into a shop and said to your friend, "Sie haben Hosen" (They have trousers) you would be saying they have more than one item.

However, if the shop had just had a hugely successful sale and was about to close for the day, you might instead say "Sie haben eine Hose" (They have a pair of trousers), meaning there was only one item remaining.

You'd never say "They have a trouser" or "They have a pant", the noun is always plural in form, you use the indefinite article "a" or the definite article "the" with "pair of" to indicate the singular.

You could also say in English "The pair of pants" (one), or "The pairs of pants" (more than one) - the indicator of quantity is the plurality or not of the word "pair". The plurality of "pants" describes their inherent nature, two "tubes", or dare I say "hoses", of cloth functioning as a single entity. They cannot be divided and still be that entity. They (plural) are one (singular).

As had been mentioned already, other words written as plural where the plurality describes the inherent, indivisible nature, and not the quantity, are scissors and sunglasses. You can also add God to this list. Unlike us, Our Creator's nature is inherently plural (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) but He is One being. In the original Hebrew, right from the first line of Genesis 1, the word we translate as God is plural: "Elohim", but the related verb "created" is in the singular form in Hebrew, indicating a single entity with inherent plurality.

I wasn't expecting to gain this understanding of the Trinity and German and English grammar today, but I enjoyed the discovery and hope you do too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaraJ5

But Duolingo has so many sentences with singular nouns without any of ein/eine articles. My german teacher would always repeat that nouns must have articles before them, but as I see in Duolingo some exercises don't go by that rule. So eather they change everything or exept "Du habst Hose" answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

nouns must have articles before them

That's mostly true for countable singular nouns, and what they need is a determiner before them.

A determiner could be an article, but it could also be a possessive or demonstrative determiner, for example -- not just "a book" or "the book" but also "my book" or "that book".

Indefinite plural nouns do not need an article, nor do uncountable singular nouns ("I need books", "I need water").

Hose is (a) countable and (b) singular. It follows the general rule of requiring a determiner before it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaraJ5

But in other exercise I've got "It is jewlery" to translate in German: "Es ist Schmuck". Der Schmuck is singular and countable noun and didn't require a determiner before it. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

But in other exercise I've got "It is jewlery" to translate in German: "Es ist Schmuck". Der Schmuck is singular and countable noun

No; it's uncountable.

You can't have "two jewelries" and you can't have zwei Schmücke (in this sense).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kobnach

Thanks. The new feature of only showing the "best" answer left me thinking that the only 'correct' answer was "Hosen". Because "best" in this case is the ihr form - "you (all) have trousers"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes - that feature has advantages and disadvantages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JPjaron

We don't say that but because shirt/hat are not plural or singular. However, we do say, "You have pants." This can mean a single pair or multiple pairs of pants and seems to apply to this context. "Du hast Hosen" was accepted, does this mean that 'Hose' is only used for a single pair of pants and 'hosen' for multiple pairs in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

Yes, eine Hose is a single pair of trousers, Hosen are multiple pairs of trousers. So du hast eine Hose for one and du hast Hosen for more. All combinations of du hast/ihr habt/Sie haben with eine Hose/Hosen are accepted because we don't know from the English sentence whether we are talking to one or more persons, or in a formal way, about one or more pairs of trousers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSha54814

No, I could say, "what shall I wear?" and then be told "you have pants." That doesn't mean it is any more than one, it's not specific enough of an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eleanor358706

You have trousers can be interpreted as "do you have a pair of trousers" ...a pair of... being understood. So the sentence has to be clearer given that this is an exercise for English speakers learning German


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo
  • Hose has to be capitalised (because it's a noun)
  • it would have to be Sie haben eine Hose with the indefinite article eine before the singular countable noun Hose.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.parlange

They don't accept «du hast eine Hose» Reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Show me a screenshot, please.

Du hast eine Hose. is one of the accepted translations, so if it wasn't accepted for you, I can't say why without seeing what you saw.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.parlange

Sorry, mizinamo, but I don't know how to come back to my answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Next time something like this happens, then :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biancandra

you could have reviewed your lesson, i hope you know this now lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spectroviper

I dont know how to send the screenshot but i wrote "Du hast Hose" wich is wrong and then retry it with "Du hast ein Hose" just now and still give me wrong :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

"Du hast eine Hose."

We need to use "eine" because "Hose" is a grammatically feminine word. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

No, "du hast eine Hose" cannot be correct, because the sentence "you have trousers" is about more than one pair of trousers. "Du hast Hosen" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

because the sentence "you have trousers" is about more than one pair of trousers.

How do you know?

"trousers" and "pants" are always plural in English, whether you are talking about one pair of trousers or many.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

Sorry, you are right. It remains difficult such a language (English) with only a plural form for a single garment. Life would be so much easier if the English speaking community would also say "eine Hose/ viele Hosen" or "een broek / meerdere broeken".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GinnieHazel

Just accepted this answer for me. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vallish1

'Du hast eine hose' translates to 'you have a pant'. They wanted 'you have pants'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

'Du hast eine hose' translates to 'you have a pant'.

No. "a pant" is not correct English.

(And lowercase hose is not correct German.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KZB16

'Du hast eine Hose' does not translate to 'you have a pant'. 'Hose' = 'pair of pants'. So it translates to 'you have a pair of pants'. So you can have eine Hose (a pair of pants), or you can have Hosen (pairs of pants).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraPir789850

Sie is "they" not "you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSha54814

Sie is formal "you", actually. As well as "they"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flashly99

Sie is also the formal version of you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SiobhanWray

It's impossible to tell from the English sentence given (You have trousers") whether we are referring to one person, many people, one pair of trousers or many pairs of trousers. It makes perfect sense in English to say "You have trousers" if referring to one pair.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, of course, and translations that refer to one pair of trousers are also accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrubbaFong

No, they are not. Mine was marked incorrect for "Du hast Hose".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Hose is countable, so if you just have one pair of trousers, you have to say Du hast eine Hose.

Du hast Hose is as wrong as "You have pair of trousers" or "You have shirt".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon_the_Druid

Okay but when it corrects me, it should show the correct form with Du instead of Ihr.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Okay but when it corrects me, it should show the correct form with Du instead of Ihr.

That would be ideal, yes. Duo is only a fairly stupid machine, though.

I really recommend getting a human teacher; they are much better at seeing when you have understood what is being taught despite a typo, or at identifying what kind of mistake was made.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FedorScheg

"You have shirt"

That one gave me a chuckle. Thank you for the explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kim.lernt.gern

It pains me to read some of these comments. Mizinamo, you have the explanations of a linguist and the patience of a saint. Thank you. Posters, please read the comments before you ask (and ask, and ask) questions that have been answered multiple times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kobnach

Duolingo at its best. du hast Hose is rejected; ihr haben Hosen is correct. OK, "you" in english only translates - in this one instance - as plural. Or maybe not; maybe there's a "du" answer I don't get to see, where the single person has only one pair of pants/trousers - which would, I believe be Hose. not Hosen. It's no more plural than the german word for "eyeglasses" is plural - when referrign to a single pair. OK, maybe the "native speaker" who wrote this meant "you have (a great big stack of) trousers. That's not obvious from the English, but neither is the idea that - for this one question - the english word "you" only refers to the 2nd person plural pronoun.

I absolutely cannot tell what the error is 1) the person creating it thinks "you" is always plural 2) the person creating it thinks "trousers" refers to multiple pairs - a single pair, would, in their mind, be "trouser" :-( 3) I'm actually wrong, and "Hose" can never be used for a single, pair of pants - in spite of what I find in Langsceidt's New college dictionary, German-English section.

I reported as "the answer I gave should be marked correct", but what a useless exercise.

This new "improvement" of only showing the "best" answer really sucks. Especially one 2 or 3 answers are equally good (du, Sie, and ihr in this case), let alone where the the author's definition of "best" seems unnatural - I rarely hear "you (several people) have trousers" - it's much more common to talk about a single individual's clothes AFAICT.

Reason 9682 why I don't pay for duolingo plus - it's just not got sufficient quality control, and too frequently makes major changes that break previously useful material.

[read the discussion below, after typing this - I did wonder about whether an article might be required, when typing my answer - but once I'd been told that I was supposed to use "Hosen", I completely forgot about that possibility. And if I weren't equipped with a dictionary, and a fair amount of self confidence, I'd probably have "learned" from this correction that it's no more normal to ever say "Hose" than it is to say "trouser". ]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

In this translation Duo accepts all three versions of "you", as well as the singular for pants: Hose. This has been explained by the Mods in several places on this discussion page.

There is no mistake on Duo's behalf here, but a common mistake for learners is forgetting to use an article in front of the singular form of Hose. (We tend to translate word-for-word and there is no article in front of English "pants", however it IS necessary in both languages for singular countable nouns. Directly quoting mizinamo (MOD):

Du hast Hose would be like saying "You have shirt" or "You have hat". That doesn't work -- it has to be "You have a shirt" or "You have a hat".

Compare this with another Duo sentence: "Er trägt einen Hut.". Note the article in front of a singular noun. You can see that we are making the mistake because of our English-tendencies. We need to think of "Hose" as "a pant" and translate accordingly--> "eine Hose".

I'm not saying Duo is perfect and free from error... but in this case, many people have made this same mistake, and it has been explained several times by the ever-so-patient MODs and contributors that you are so passionately claiming to be incorrect. (Huge thank you to them for providing us with FREE education and helpful answers!!!)

Edit @Kobnach: I just stumbled across the addition you made to your post, and I felt it was amazingly gracious. In retrospect, I hope my initial post didn't come across as aggressive. Best of luck with your studies! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Merrittkr

Thank you! Despite the explanations further up, your comment finally helped me figure out where I was going wrong. "Hose" being singular in German, not singular / plural like English.

So "Du hast Hose" => "You have pant" even though we English natives think it would be "You have pants".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annaa52

The more I learn different languages and read people's comments about the minute reasons why something is right or not wrong, the more I wonder if correct language isn't just another way of separating "us" from "them." We all want to belong, so we try to learn the accepted way of speaking.
I don't mean we shouldn't learn to speak correctly - as our hearers understand that to be. Just a philosophical observation about human nature, and how language is used to divide as well as to unite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I did wonder about whether an article might be required, when typing my answer - but once I'd been told that I was supposed to use "Hosen", I completely forgot about that possibility.

Duo's corrections can never replace those of a real thinking human.

In general, it seems to prefer corrections that do not change the number of words in a sentence, so it opted to change the incorrect Hose to Hosen rather than to eine Hose (adding a word).

Similarly, it seems to prefer corrections that keep earlier words the same, so someone translating "the cat" as der Katze may get corrected to der Kater (the tomcat) rather than to die Katze, as if Duo thinks that the user got the article der right but "misspelled" Kater as Katze, rather than the user getting the article of Katze wrong.

Alas.

I highly recommend getting a real human teacher if you can find a good, affordable one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CelloHead

So, I could have translated it as "Du hast eine Hose" -(singular) You have (singular) pants- as opposed to "Ihr habt hosen" -(plural) You have (plural) pants- and it would've been correct? That's all I need to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes.

Or even du hast Hosen (you, one person, have several pairs of pants) or ihr habt eine Hose (you, several people, together possess one pair of pants).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

@TaraJ5:

But in other exercise I've got "It is jewlery" to translate in German: "Es ist Schmuck". Der Schmuck is singular and countable noun and didn't require a determiner before it. Why?

Schmuck is not countable. You can't have drei Schmücke any more than you can have "three jewelleries".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank718718

When do you know to use habt as opposed to haben, or another?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 609
  • ich habe
  • du hast
  • er/sie/es hat
  • wir haben
  • ihr habt
  • sie haben

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    There are three forms of "you" in German: informal singular (du), informal plural (ihr) and formal (Sie). They each conjugate verbs differently - kind of like how you have "I am" but "you are" or "he is", each of the three "you"s need a different form of the same verb. For haben, this corresponds to du hast, ihr habt and Sie haben. You can look up the conjugation of any verb on verbix.com or canoo.net.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ancepsinfans

    I guess the logic here is that we’re using plural you, so there are multiple people and thus multiple pairs of trousers?

    Unlike others in this thread, my task was German->English translation, but the opposite would be very difficult to get correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amfitrite

    The English sentence doesn't show clearly whether a singular or a plural form should be used


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    That's true, and that's why both alternatives -- with eine Hose, singular, and Hosen, plural, are accepted.

    Du hast Hose is not, of course, just as "You have shirt" or "You have hat" would not be acceptable. Countable objects in the singular almost always need a determiner of some sort in front of them, such as an indefinite article.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmkfrommn

    But these aren't good comparisons. Try "You have glasses." Yes, that is acceptable and good English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    But these aren't good comparisons.

    Yes they are -- I am comparing with singular countable nouns such as "shirt" and "hat", because in German, Hose is a singular countable noun.

    "glasses" and "pants" are plural nouns in English, but that doesn't affect the fact that in German, Brille and Hose are singular countable nouns.

    (So Du hast Brille. would also not be correct, because in German, Brille is singular, even though "glasses" is plural in English. The grammar -- whether an article before it is required -- is thus different between the two languages.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewHoll656711

    In previous examples "Ihr" was "You all". Here, how was I supposed to tell if "you" meant "Ihr" or "Du"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    In previous examples "Ihr" was "You all".

    Only in the sentences added by the Pearson team -- unfortunately, though they were intended only for their own course using the Duolingo platform, they were visible in the public course as well. Hopefully this will be remedied at some point and the Pearson sentences split out from the public course.

    Here, how was I supposed to tell if "you" meant "Ihr" or "Du"?

    You cannot, and so both answers are acceptable -- both Ihr habt Hosen. and Du hast Hosen.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TalRisin

    Is "Sie haben Hosen" also acceptable?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Yes, Sie haben Hosen is fine, too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZyroMess1

    Because of this YOU in english where you don't know if it's single or plural i hate english.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

    It could be much simpler if we just decided on a plural you, like y'all/you all/you guys, for ihr and used you for du or Sie.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    English already has a plural you: it's "you".

    It's the singular you, "thou", that got lost :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaVandi2

    In English it is impossible to know if "you" is singular or plural. So I think that "du hast Hosen" is also correct. Nevertheles it is marked incorrect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Nevertheles it is marked incorrect.

    That would surprise me, since du hast Hosen is one of the listed alternatives.

    Can you show me a screenshot, please?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatherineLangan

    In the information section for this lesson the issue of pants/trousers as plural in English was mentioned contrasting it with German Hose (single pair of pants) and Hosen (plural pairs of pants). Nothing was mentioned of an obligatory article with the German singular. The English stimulus "You have trousers" is completely ambiguous for how many pairs. If an article is necessary in German for singular, that should be added to the background information.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

    No, that an article is necessary in German is something you should already know. You have been practising with sentences like "Du hast eine Zeitung". Why would "Hose" behave differently than "Zeitung"? And look at it differently instead of complaining: because you did it wrong now, you will never forget it again. You have learned something!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.parlange

    I totaly agree with you. Josee. Complaining is never the best way. Besides, I am learning three other languages here and I can tell that this one (German from English) is by far the best. Explanations are very clear, our Mizinamo is perfect, and the exercises are well done. German is a difficult language but they make it easy to lern.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RogerDavis9

    I think (complete beginner) that the only way to express "eine Hose" would be to say "a pair of trousers".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KZB16

    Exactly right! That's what Hose means.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wilsh

    trousers are singular I am wearing singular pair of trousers, more to the point no one has used the singular trouse since 1900


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deepbandivadekar

    When do we use Du and when to use Ihr!? These cases are very confusing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Use du when speaking to one person that you know well.

    Use ihr when speaking to several people that you know well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShannonCoo952225

    Trousers is both plural and singular english so Du hast Hose should also be correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No. Du hast Hose is not correct.

    Hose is a countable noun in German, so in the singular, you need an article: Du hast eine Hose.

    Du hast Hose would be like saying "You have shirt" or "You have hat". That doesn't work -- it has to be "You have a shirt" or "You have a hat".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THEW1LD0NE

    Why isn't 'Du hast Hosen' correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

    "Du hast Hosen" was accepted for me :-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesmoni

    Why habt and not hat?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because the verb form for the subject ihr is habt.

    hat is for er, sie, es.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AKWeb

    I'm still struggling with knowing when to use 'ihr' and 'du'. Does anyone have any advice?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn
    • "ihr" is used when talking to more than one person. If it helps, you can think of it as "You all."
    • "du" is used for talking to just one person in a familiar/casual way. This is not appropriate for strangers, bosses, teachers, etc.
    • "Sie" (with a capital 'S') also means "you" and is used for talking to one person in a formal/respectful way. ... I know you didn't ask about "Sie", but it's good to know since we're on the topic :-)

    When translating "you" from English to German on Duo, you can take your pick from the three. There will only be one answer on the discussion page, but all forms are equally correct without context. Duo will accept du/Sie/ihr as long as you used the corresponding form of the verb. For example, "you have":

    • du hast // Sie haben // ihr habt

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gail616867

    OK, I get that I could have put "du hast Hosen", but when is "Hose" ever used, if it means "pant"? Can anyone give an example for me please?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    when is "Hose" ever used, if it means "pant"?

    It doesn't mean "pant".

    The word "pants" is always plural in English, similar to "spectacles/glasses" or "scissors" or "binoculars".

    But in German, you have Hose, which refers to one pair of pants, and Hosen, which refers to multiple pairs of pants.

    Just "pants" can be either (eine) Hose or Hosen, depending on how many you're talking about.

    For example, "I like those pants you're wearing right now" would be Ich mag die Hose, die du gerade trägst, but "I bought some pants yesterday" could be either Ich habe gestern eine Hose gekauft or Ich habe gestern ein paar Hosen gekauft depending on how many pairs you bought.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgie885117

    Why not, Sie haben Hose, polite formal?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    That would be like saying "You have pair of pants".

    It doesn't work; Hose is countable, like "pair", so in the singular, you need a determiner before it (such as an article).

    Sie haben Hosen and Sie haben eine Hose work as translations of "You have pants" -- the first one says that you have multiple pairs of pants, the second that you have one pair of pants.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgie885117

    I understand now, thank you very much for your clear explanation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgie885117

    Still confused about knowing what the English , 'you' is in this sentence? It could be , Sie , pl or du , informal or have i missed something?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    It could be Sie (formal, singular or plural), ihr (informal plural), or du (informal singular).

    All three will be accepted as long as you use the appropriate verb form that matches the subject you choose.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teacher946250

    the use of the Du form is also correct in English. Unless you identify the plural "you" as "you all."

    Thus, the given correction is incorrect as the only option.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    the use of the Du form is also correct in English.

    What do you mean?

    "du" is a German word, not an English word.

    What is a "Du form" supposed to be in English?

    the given correction

    What do you mean with that?

    Nobody can see what you see, so please always quote entire sentences -- e.g. the full text of a correction or the complete text of your answer. Please do not just quote individual words as often the problem is not with one individual word but with word order or the gender of an article or adjective elsewhere in the sentence.

    as the only option.

    Nearly all sentences (including this one) on Duolingo have multiple correct answers. Sometimes thousands of correct answers.

    In a correction, you will usually only be shown one of the correct answers - but that doesn't imply that there is only that one.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrizpc

    Why not du hast hose


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    For the same reason that we wouldn’t say “You have shirt” in English.

    Shirts have two sleeves, but we still consider “shirt” a countable singular noun. You can “wear a shirt” or “buy three shirts”.

    In German, it’s the same with Hose: pants have two legs, but Germans consider Hose a countable singular noun. It’s just one object, after all: pick it up anywhere and the entire garment will rise up from the floor. So in German, you can say du hast eine Hose or ich kaufe drei Hosen.

    But du hast Hose makes as little sense as “you have shirt”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.M3M3

    If you are going to make the answer "Ihr habt Hosen" at least make the english translation a plural version of the word you. Ex. You all have the trousers.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    least make the english translation a plural version of the word you

    "you" is the plural version of the word in English.

    The singular "thou" dropped out of usage and so the plural "you" is now used whether you are speaking to one person or to many of them.

    People in some areas have come up with new, explicitly plural forms such as "y'all", "yinz", or "ye", but in standard English, just "you" is the plural form.

    the answer

    There is more than one correct translation, so there is no one single "the" answer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julian484796

    I feel like you deserve an award for repeating yourself over and over again and not giving up!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zoe158607

    Who else hears "habt" as "ihr habt" but very quicly?!


    [deactivated user]

      Why is "Ihr habt Hose" wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Why is "Ihr habt Hose" wrong?

      Singular Hose without an article before it is wrong in German. Please see the existing comments for du hast Hose which is wrong for the same reason.


      [deactivated user]

        Thanks. Let's just a agree that it is misleadingly confusing, and not clear at all how many pairs it is referring to.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        I agree that the English is not clear about how many pairs it is referring to -- which is why the German translation accepts both the singular ... eine Hose and the plural ... Hosen.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmkfrommn

        How do I unfollow this discussion?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilsav.R.

        It would be nice if we had to write both likely correct responses out. I would like to show that i can conjugate both forms of 'you have' and show plurals or singular of 'pants.' All four possible combinations could have been correct, right? English doesn't specify. Most likely 'Du hast Hose' or 'Ihr habt Hosen' but you wanted the latter, which I do not understand why.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        both forms of 'you have'

        There are three (informal singular, informal plural, and formal/polite).

        All four possible combinations could have been correct, right?

        Most sentences have more than one accepted answer. Some have hundreds of accepted answers.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        'Hose' is singular as explained by Mizinamo below. I think that all translations for "you have" are accepted by Duo: "du hast", "ihr habt" and "Sie haben".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauraKrenz

        Did not accept Du hast and it wanted Hosen rather than the singular.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Did not accept Du hast

        That would surprise me (at least, if the remainder of the sentence is correct)

        and it wanted Hosen rather than the singular.

        And this, too; both Hosen and eine Hose should be accepted.

        Do you have a screenshot of it not accepting an answer you consider correct?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat287658

        Why is it ihr and not du?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Why is it ihr and not du?

        Both are possible translations of "you", as long as you use the appropriate verb form -- ihr habt or du hast.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingTiger5237

        Because they're talking about multiple people, but they didn't say "You all, y'all, youse" to acknowledge that it's multiple people for the English in the question.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JNE31xyA

        My feeling is "Du hast Hose" should be correct. If someone who hahbitually wore dresses suddenly appeared in trousers I might well exclaim "You have trousers", probably with an emphasis on the "have". Michael Turnbull


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        My feeling is "Du hast Hose" should be correct.

        It is as incorrect as "You have shirt" or "You have hat".

        If someone who habitually goes topless suddenly appears in a shirt, would you say "You have shirt"?

        No - either "You have a shirt" or "You have shirts".

        Similarly, you can say Du hast eine Hose or Du hast Hosen. But Du hast Hose doesn't make grammatical gense in German.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat287658

        Thanks for your replies to this. This one puts it into perspective for me


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tmscs1

        So Duolingo doesn't accept "I am wearing trousers" as an acceptable translation to "Ich trage Hose" (preferring 'pants' instead), but it clearly does acknowledge the word 'trousers' as correct in this reverse translation...


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeborahLac19

        so the pants are stained is Hose but this one is plural i still dont get it!!!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        this one is plural

        It can be singular (Du hast eine Hose) or plural (Du hast Hosen).

        What doesn't work is Du hast Hose -- for the same reason that "You have hat" or "You have shirt" would be wrong in English: countable nouns require an article in the singular.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Garry320896

        I agree du hast or sie haben should be ok also hose or hosen is ok i think


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        All combinations of "du hast"/"ihr habt"/"Sie haben" with "Hosen"/"eine Hose" are accepted. Note the capitalization of "Sie", "Hosen" and "Hose".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Note the capitalization of "Sie", "Hosen" and "Hose".

        And note the presence of eine in eine Hose.

        Du hast Hose etc. without eine would not be accepted.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        Yes, of course the singular noun with the article. I found that so self-evident that I did not think it necessary to point to that. You, Mizinamo, know from experience that it is necessary for lots of Duolingo students to tell this.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leopold346869

        Please tell me how I was using the wrong word.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Please tell me how I was using the wrong word.

        Please first tell us your entire sentence.

        Or even better, show us a screenshot (upload it to a website somewhere and paste the URL here).

        Nobody can see what you wrote, so nobody can help you if you won't tell us what your answer was.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian689905

        I have lots of pair of trousers. I dont think that german men are so poor they only have one pair each! du hast hosen is ok.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        du hast hosen is ok.

        Nearly okay. du hast Hosen with capital H would be okay.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gapaulo

        Ok, I said Du hast Hose. It seems that Hose can mean pants or trousers and so can Die Hose. What's the difference?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Hose can mean pants or trousers

        It's countable and singular. So eine Hose = one pair of pants/trousers.

        Just saying Du hast Hose is as wrong as saying "you have shirt" or "you have sock" or "you have pair of pants".

        die Hose is definite: "the (pair of) pants".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gapaulo

        Das ist klar, und vielen danke!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donna991881

        What is wrong with "du hast"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        What is wrong with "du hast"

        That only means "you have". It does not mean "you have trousers". So you left out part of the sentence.

        (Please always quote your entire answer when you have a question about why something was not accepted.)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShrutiRatn1

        Difference in ihr and du? Both stnd for 'you'?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        "Ihr" is plural and "du" is singular. Du hast. Ihr habt.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy986803

        As comments below, my answer "Du hast Hose" was deemed incorrect translation of "You have trousers". In fact the sentence in English seems to have several correct translations: du hast Hose, du hast Hosen, ihr habt Hose, ihr habt Hosen, Sie haben Hose, Sie haben Hosen.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        I think you've overlooked something. "Trousers" is "eine Hose" (one pair of trousers) or "Hosen" (several pairs of trousers). So if you regard "trousers" as a single piece of garment then you must translate it as "Hose" with the article "eine".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.parlange

        All of them can have «Hosen» or «eine Hose»'but never just «Hose». If I have understood properly the explanations


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        Yes, you have.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.parlange

        Thanks, Josee. To be honest, I did know it. This was just my way of underlining that I am a very begginer and have had the opportunity of learning that just by READING the comments here, specially those of Mizinamo. The same opportunity most people seem to be missing.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beverly651193

        The sentence "You have trousers" can be translated into German in multiple ways. Duolingo does not specify if this is 2nd person singular or plural, or whether the pairs of trousers are singular or plural. So the program should accept multiple answers.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        So the program should accept multiple answers.

        And it does. There are a total of 24 accepted answers.

        (What was your entire answer?)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caryatide

        ???? I have read down this thread rather far. (My favourite intervener is mizinamo. Thank you, though you should refrain from advising us all to get a live teacher which seems to contradict the purported aims of Duolingo.) We seem to up against the annoyance of Discovery learning techniques.

        <h1>1 So… (what follows is a question)</h1>

        I seem to have discovered that correct answers would be: Du hast eine Hose. Du hast Hosen. feminine noun s. / pl. Ihr habt eine Hose. Ihr habt Hosen. Sie haben eine Hose. Sie haben Hosen. ??????? When we read Hose, we should understand a pair of trousers (the word pair being a singular, non-count noun).

        <h1>2 So further, this is like… (again, what follows is a question)</h1>

        Du isst eine Orange. Du isst Orange. feminine noun s. / pl Ihr esst eine Orange. Ihr esst Orangen. Sie essen eine Orange. Sie essen Orangen. ??????

        <h1>3 Assuming I have got it right so far, and just to check that I have got this all sorted out, are these next sentences equivalent correct sentences with the definite determinant (not correct translations for “You have trousers” but rather “You have the pants”):</h1>

        Du hast die Hose. Du hast die Hosen. Ihr habt die Hose. Ihr habt die Hosen. Sie haben die Hose. Sie haben die Hosen. Is this correct?

        <h1>4 (yet another question) Do these sentences translate “You wear NO ”, “You are NOT wearing A/ANY jacket” (using a negative indefinite determiner, in English no, not one) (this part I am really not sure about):</h1>

        Du trägst keine Jacke. …none with you on this very cool evening?! Ihr tragt keine Jacke Sie tragen keine Jacke. Du hast keine Jacken. …you don’t own one?! Ihr habt keine Jacken. Sie haben keine Jacken. (I couldn't imagine why someone does not wear pants, certainly not why they would, or would not, wear more than one pair of pants.) Have I got this right?

        <h1>5 Could the sentences for "You have trousers", at the top, also mean "you have SOME trousers... on the clothes horse in the laundry room" ((affirmative) indefinite determinant)? Du hast eine Hose... Du hast Hosen... Ihr habt / Sie haben... ....</h1>

        If you have reached this far and can help, thanks in advance.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        you should refrain from advising us all to get a live teacher

        Duolingo has limits -- chief of them being that it doesn't actually understand any language but can only compare text strings. Sometimes people come up against these limits. None of the people who read these sentence discussions are programmers working for Duolingo, so we have no influence on these limits.

        Do you have advice for what I should say instead when someone says, "A human would have known that this was an honest mistake!" ?

        correct answers would be: Du hast eine Hose. Du hast Hosen. feminine noun s. / pl. Ihr habt eine Hose. Ihr habt Hosen. Sie haben eine Hose. Sie haben Hosen. ?

        That is correct.

        When we read Hose, we should understand a pair of trousers

        That's right.

        (the word pair being a singular, non-count noun).

        No. "trousers" is always plural and is not countable, but "pair" is countable -- you can have "one pair of trousers" or "three pairs of trousers".

        this is like… (again, what follows is a question)

        Du isst eine Orange. Du isst Orange. feminine noun s. / pl Ihr esst eine Orange. Ihr esst Orangen. Sie essen eine Orange. Sie essen Orangen. ?

        Those sentences are all correct German, but English would make the same singular/plural distinction as German does: "You are eating an orange" versus "You are eating oranges".

        are these next sentences equivalent correct sentences with the definite determinant (not correct translations for “You have trousers” but rather “You have the pants”):

        Du hast die Hose. Du hast die Hosen. Ihr habt die Hose. Ihr habt die Hosen. Sie haben die Hose. Sie haben die Hosen. Is this correct?

        Yes, that's correct.

        Du trägst keine Jacke. …none with you on this very cool evening?!

        Correct.

        Ihr tragt keine Jacke

        I would use the plural here (ihr tragt keine Jacken): if you're talking to five people you would expect to see five jackets -- not one jacket encompassing all of them at once.

        But the singular is sometimes used in German in a "one per person" meaning.

        Du hast keine Jacken. …you don’t own one?

        You would use plural keine Jacken if you would expect that person to own two or more jackets.

        You would use keine Jacke if you would expect the person to own exactly one jacket.

        For example, I might say ich habe keine Kinder (plural, because many people have two or more children) but ich habe keine Ehefrau (singular, because most people have at most one wife [at a time]).

        With jackets, either might work.

        I'm not quite sure what you mean with question 5, but "some" as an indefinite plural determiner is generally not translated in German, so Du hast Hosen could translate to "you have pants/trousers" or "you have some pants/trousers", and Du isst Orangen could be either "you are eating oranges" or "you are eating some oranges":


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HristoBlaser

        do hast Hosen - what's the problem here ?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        do hast Hosen - what's the problem here ?

        You used the English word do instead of the German word du.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juangrullon96

        I dont get it. How do you know ehrn "You" is translated to "Du" or "Ihr"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        How do you know ehrn "You" is translated to "Du" or "Ihr"?

        In general, you don't -- and so both translations will be accepted. (Providing, of course, that you use the appropriate verb form that matches the pronoun you choose.)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kxgilf

        I know that "du" is when its one person and "ihr" is plural, but how do I know when its plural or not in a sentence?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        how do I know when its plural or not in a sentence?

        You can't. Which is why both translations are accepted.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcelaLon759255

        Why not du hast Hosen?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Why not du hast Hosen?

        That's also a possible translation -- if you are talking to one person rather than several.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JNE31xyA

        What is wrong with "Du hast Hose". Without context there is no indication in English that "You have Trousers" is either singular or plural


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Without context there is no indication in English that "You have Trousers" is either singular or plural

        That's right.

        So both Du hast Hosen. and Du hast eine Hose. are possible.

        But "Du hast Hose" is as wrong as "you have shirt" or "you have coat" would be -- you need an article before a countable singular noun.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoatazAldd

        What is the wrong with "ihr habt eine hose"???


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        What is the wrong with "ihr habt eine hose"???

        Nothing. (Apart from the missing capitalisation of Hose, which Duolingo unfortunately ignores.)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MansiSangw

        Why hose is unacceptable here? It's clear he's talking in terms of a singular way.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        Yes, but only when you use the article. eine Hose (singular) or Hosen (plural).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philipbelcher

        Trousers is singular like American Pants, which are not what we British consider to be pants. In fact the confusion is just pants


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillParker9

        You cant tell wether to say ihr habt or du hat


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        Indeed, English does not specify whether it's the singular or plural you: du hast or ihr habt. Even the formal you is possible: Sie haben. Duo accepts them all if you use the correct conjugation and correct "trousers": eine Hose or Hosen.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        You cant tell wether to say ihr habt or du hat

        du hat is never correct; du verb forms end in -st, as in du hast.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yura.UA.

        Can someone please explain why I can't translate "You have trousers" as "Du hast hose/hosen"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Can someone please explain

        Have you read all of the comments on this page?

        It has been explained several times why Du hast Hose. is bad German.

        Du hast Hosen., on the other hand, is accepted as a translation.

        And since capitalisation is (unfortunately) ignored by Duolingno, Du hast hosen. will also work.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Locke2000

        I completely understand why "Du hast Hose" is incorrect, but would "Du hast Hosen" be accepted? The downvotes for the question and the upvotes for DavidBertsche's comment might lead people to believe "Du hast Hose" is correct. Good job, Mizinamo and others


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        would "Du hast Hosen" be accepted?

        Yes -- completely fine to say, if you're talking to one person who has multiple pairs of pants.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simoacqua

        "You"could also be a singular pronoun, this should not be a mistake


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        "You"could also be a singular pronoun

        Of course.

        this should not be a mistake

        Please always quote your entire answer when you have a question.

        Since nobody can see what you wrote, references to "this" or "my answer" are not helpful.

        Please always always read all the comments before posting a new one, to see whether your question has been asked before and has already received an answer.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gunny937305

        Pls can some one tell me how sie haben is correct sie haben means they have am i not correct


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        sie haben means they have

        That's right.

        And Sie haben means "you have".

        At the beginning of a sentence you can't tell the difference between sie (they) and Sie (you), since the first word of a sentence is always capitalised.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwalad1n

        Why is 'Du' not right? I don't understand how to tell if it is supposed to be a formal or informal 'you' from an English sentence.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Why is 'Du' not right?

        Because you are asked to translate an entire sentence here -- "You have trousers." -- but Du simply means "you", not "you have trousers".

        For that, you need Du hast Hosen. or Du hast eine Hose.

        I don't understand how to tell if it is supposed to be a formal or informal 'you' from an English sentence.

        Must of the time, you can't, which is why both Du hast ... and Ihr habt ... are accepted in front of ... eine Hose or ... Hosen.


        Also, in case you wrote more than just Du -- please always quote your entire answer when you have a question.

        Often, if a question is rejected, the reason for the error lies in a different part of the sentence than the one that someone quotes in a comment here.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwalad1n

        Thank you that was helpful. Yes, I did put more than just du, but I can't remember exactly what. I think I may have conjugated it incorrectly maybe


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James728564

        How come "du hast hosen" is not acceptable here? There is no specification as to the plurality of the persons.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        How come "du hast hosen" is not acceptable here?

        That should be accepted (since Duolingo unfortunately ignores capitalisation; it should, of course, be Hosen with a capital H since it's a noun).

        Do you have a screenshot of that answer being rejected?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James728564

        Unfortunately I do not, but thank you for clarifying that. I was not aware of the need to capitalise nouns!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiroslavKu91789

        Du hast Hoseb is not acceptable here


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        "Hoseb" is a typo, but du hast Hosen is an accepted translation.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juliasn68

        "Du hast Hosen" and "Ihr habt Hosen" are both writen exactly the same in english as "You have trousers". The only accepted option was the "Ihr" one, but as I wrote the other, I got it incorrect.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Do you have a screenshot of Du hast Hosen being marked incorrect? That should be accepted.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSha54814

        Trousers is confusing. In English that can be one OR more than one. "Pair of" or "pairs of" is the only way to ask the question to force it to plural


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magdalena460649

        The English sentence doesn't specify whether 'you' here is singular or plural. There lots of mistakes in English though.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        The English sentence doesn't specify whether 'you' here is singular or plural.

        That's right - which is why both translations are accepted.

        There lots of mistakes in English though.

        But if you don't identify them, they will never be fixed.

        • Which sentence has a mistake?
        • Where in that sentence is a mistake?
        • Why is it wrong?
        • What should it be instead?

        Just saying "there are mistakes" helps nobody.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jingo386410

        I'm sorry, Mizinamo, but you are wrong. This sentence is correct English for singular trousers without a determiner.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        This sentence

        Please always quote the entire sentence you are referring to when you make a comment.

        "this sentence", "the translation", "it", "my answer" etc. are not helpful.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraPir789850

        You need to qualify whether "you" should be singular or plural


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        You need to qualify whether "you" should be singular or plural

        There is no "should".

        Both singular and plural translations are accepted, precisely because English "you" is ambiguous.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter880922

        why is "Du hast Hose" wrong trousers is a singular noun in English - a pair of trousers


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        why is "Du hast Hose" wrong

        This has already been explained on this page. Please read all the comments.

        trousers is a singular noun in English

        No, it isn't. You can't talk about "this trousers" or say "my trousers is dirty", for example.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter880922

        A pair of trousers is one garment. A pair is often in ellipsis so rousers could mean one pair or a collection of in your question. Please be more careful in future. Hose in English would refer to leggings. One pair two legs. Or in modern times to stockings or tights. If I am wearing trousers that would be just one pair at a time. A single garment. My trousers are tight it this pair of trousers is tight. Think a little deeper please.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        A pair of trousers is one garment.

        True. Which goes quite a way to explaining why eine Hose is singular in German -- just one garment, after all.

        My trousers are tight

        There you go. You use "are" with "trousers" -- it's grammatically plural in English.

        But in German, Hose is grammatically singular.

        And much as in English, singular countable common nouns almost always need a determiner before them.

        Saying Du hast Hose would be just as wrong as "You have shirt" -- it has to be Du hast eine Hose just like "You have a shirt".

        "trousers", being grammatically plural, does not need an article in English, and so "You have trousers" is fine, just like (say) "You have shoes" or Du hast Schuhe.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PruthviKarnik

        How to know which to use"Du" or "Ihr"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        You can't know whether "you" is singular or plural. That means that both du and ihr will be accepted. You need the corresponding conjugation of the verb.
        And don't forget to think about "trousers": is it a single pair of trousers (eine Hose) or more pairs of trousers (Hosen). Good luck, you can do it!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prestone11

        It would be nice if Duo would differentiate between You All (a simple y'all would be fine) and You Singular. "You" in English can be both.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        "You" in English can be both.

        Right.

        That's how standard English works. ("y'all, ye, yinz, ..." are all regional; there is no standard word specifically for "you plural" that is accepted everywhere.)

        Duolingo is not going to change the English language.

        So it goes with what it has -- and accepts both singular and plural translations for an English "you", e.g. both du hast Hosen and ihr habt Hosen.


        Asking for a separate word for ihr in English would be like asking for a separate word for dich as opposed to du (object versus subject) -- distinguishing between "I see you and you see me". Standard English simply doesn't have this distinction, and Duolingo isn't going to invent one.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingTiger5237

        Okay... How the hell am I supposed to know they are using the 'You' in "You have trousers" as a plural? Say "You all" or "Y'all" or even the rare "Youse", just something to differentiate.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        How the hell am I supposed to know they are using the 'You' in "You have trousers" as a plural?

        You aren't. Both singular and plural translations are accepted.

        Same with singular and plural translations of "trousers", since you can't tell whether it's referring to a single pair of trousers or to multiple pairs.

        For example, these are some acceptable translations:

        • Du hast eine Hose.
        • Du hast Hosen.
        • Ihr habt eine Hose.
        • Ihr habt Hosen.

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingTiger5237

        Except no they aren't both accepted, because when I put "Du" instead of "Ihr" it says it was wrong and I had to do it again.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        when I put "Du" instead of "Ihr" it says it was wrong

        You also have to use the verb form that matches the subject -- you cannot just switch the subject out and say e.g. du habt or ihr hast, any more than you can say "we am" or "I is".

        What was your entire sentence?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingTiger5237

        That's the problem as well, that would give me a correct mark for a wrong answer. Ihr hast would be wrong. Why not just add 'all' after the you since that's what we already do in English.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marienkafer5

        the point is that ihr habt and du hast both translate as you have in English, since we only have one word for "you." Also, in English trouser and trousers are the same thing. You can have one or many pairs of trousers, and each is A pair OF trousers. If the sentence were I am wearing trousers, perhaps it would be different.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saturnize

        If I input "Du hast Trousers" it gives an incorrect mark, but if I put down "Hosen" instead of "Trousers" (Trousers being an acceptable word) it's marked correctly. Perhaps I'll flag this one.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        "Trousers" is not a German word. Make Duo happy and translate "trousers" as "eine Hose" or "Hosen".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juangrullon96

        DU HAST HOSE should be correct.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        No, it is not correct. The singular "Hose" needs an article. Du hast eine Hose = you have a pair of trousers (one). Du hast Hosen = you have pairs of trousers (two or more). Please read Mizinamo's explanation somewhere above on this page.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom540994

        Du hast hose was my option too, it should be correct


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        It is not correct, because you forgot the article eine and the capital H. Du hast eine Hose is a correct translation. There are more correct translations as you can read in the other comments.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric221908

        I put "Du hast Hose", and it was counted as incorrect.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        I put "Du hast Hose", and it was counted as incorrect.

        Yes, of course. Because that's wrong. As has been discussed multiple times on this page.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric221908

        Thank you for your super constructive comment, Moderator. As I am not a moderator, I did not have cause to review other messages. However, if there is a benefit to you being snide and obnoxious about it, it does give me a chance to elaborate on it for the developers' sake. In contrast to other mistakes I've made where I am given the German version of a particular grammatical distinction to translate into to English first before encountering an English to German question (like my previous stumbles on den Apfel), this is the first interaction with the particular combination of "second person singular" + "to have" + "trousers". In fact, was also the first utilization of the word "trousers" as opposed to "pants" or "pairs of pants"specifically anywhere, which, who knows, could be a distinction in itself in a language one is not accustomed to. If there is a way to reorder questions so one encounters a notion of "{second or third person singular} have trousers" prior to seeing this particular challenge, that would be helpful, and probably prevent the question from being raised so much. Which would in turn reduce the chances of the eager learners from your app encountering the Reddit troll style moderator who lurks here and debate on switching back to MemRise.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        In fact, was also the first utilization of the word "trousers" as opposed to "pants" or "pairs of pants"specifically anywhere

        Yes, that's an inconsistency in the course.

        Generally, the course uses US English throughout, so "trousers" is not a good word here.

        which, who knows, could be a distinction in itself in a language one is not accustomed to.

        True.

        Though the tips and notes for this skill unit ( https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Clothing/tips-and-notes ) do mention both words in this context.

        You may not have seen those if you're using a mobile app -- those seem to show either no tips at all or a different kind of "tips" (not "tips and notes") which come from somewhere else that I have no access to.

        If there is a way to reorder questions so one encounters a notion of "{second or third person singular} have trousers" prior to seeing this particular challenge

        Not easily -- Duolingo picks questions seemingly at random.

        If du hast, ihr habt, wir haben etc. have been introduced before and only Hose or Hosen is new, Duolingo will feel free to pick any sentence containing Hose to show to a learner.

        debate on switching back to MemRise.

        Duolingo is heavily metrics-driven, from what I know, and one of the metrics they seem to look at a lot is learner retention. If people actually do wander off to MemRise when they encounter this, I think that might get their attention.

        That said, Duolingo the company is not the same group as the contributors to the course -- who used to be volunteers like myself; I believe they're now freelancers. So the people who get the message "people are having difficulty over this sentence and are leaving the course over it" and the people who maintain the course are not the same group.

        Also, I'm not sure whether the current group of course contributors read the forums -- let alone "random" sentence discussions such as this one. So I'm not sure how helpful your comment will end up being.

        And finally:

        As I am not a moderator, I did not have cause to review other messages.

        Lots of people seem to have that attitude, and I find it frustrating.

        Someone asks a question, and someone else answers it.

        Someone else asks the same question -- and someone else answers it.

        Someone elses asks the same question the third time.

        Why?

        Why cause all that clutter? Why not learn from the previous answers given? Why insist on a personalised response delivered to your email inbox?

        Please read through comments before posting your own from now on.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlairGrimm21

        There isn't only one answer! How are you supposed to tell which case it's in?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorinthiaD3

        Why isn't the singular correct? Are we supposed to guess if the statement is singular or plural.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Why isn't the singular correct?

        When you have a question, please always quote your entire answer.

        Before you do so, though, please read through all of the comments to see whether your question has been asked -- and possibly answered -- before.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brad796856

        You need to work on plurals or this is never gonna translate.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RitasreeMaji

        My "Du hast Hose" wasn't accepted!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        My "Du hast Hose" wasn't accepted!

        Of course not -- it's wrong. As has been explained in the other comments on this page.

        (If you did not see any comments when you came here, consider switching from a mobile app to the website for Duolingo.)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam571893

        Sorry, I've read through all of these replies and I still don't understand why "Du hast Hose" or "Du hast die Hose" is incorrect. Why must it be "Ihr habt Hosen"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helena916496

        Du hast hose is correct ,cthe question does not state "you' plural.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        You're right that you can't know you is singular or plural. However "du hast hose" is not correct. The noun Hose (with a capital H) is a single pair of trousers, so you need the article eine (just like the English "you have a book"). If you want to use the plural of Hose (more than one pair of trousers) then it's Hosen (with a final n and no article).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean984813

        Mizinamo is wrong. As a native English speaker you have trousers can easily be singular and plural!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        I'm afraid you can't read. Several times is explained by Mizinamo and several people
        1. that the singular trousers is eine Hose;
        2. that the plural trousers are Hosen;
        3. that you need to include the article when you want to translate the singular trousers;
        4. that we can't tell from the English sentence whether we are talking about one or more trousers;
        5. that we can't tell from the English sentence whether the 'you' is one person or more;
        6. that all combinations of du,ihr,Sie with eine Hose or Hosen are accepted if you use the correct conjugation of the verb.

        I would appreciate it if you say sorry to Mizinamo because he is one of the Duo's best moderators.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ighishi

        whats wrong with du habt hosen?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaVandi2

        It has to be "du hast" (you singular) or "ihr habt" (you plural).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth608361

        It is also ENTIRELY correct to say: She haven Hosen.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaVandi2

        I think you mean : "Sie haben Hosen".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrioCruz3

        Du hast hose should be correct. In other exercises they allow it


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaVandi2

        No it is not ! Correct is : "Du hast EINE Hose", "Du hast HoseN" or you plural "Ihr habt eine Hose", "Ihr habt Hosen".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorisumgam

        What's wrong with Du hast Hose? That's a correct translation of You have trousers. Should not have been marked wrong.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        Please read the other questions and answers before asking the same question again.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KZB16

        lorisumgam, Hose does not mean "pants", it means "pair of pants". So your translation "Du hast Hose" is like saying in English "You have pair of pants". You would rather say, "You have a pair of pants", so in German it would be "Du hast eine Hose. Hope that helps.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qK1YZOPI

        They're complaints years old and this still isn't fixed. So we know whether you mean you singular or you plural then for plural it needs to be "you all" in English so we know this


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        They're complaints years old and this still isn't fixed.

        If by "this still isn't fixed" you mean that "learners still don't know that eine Hose is singular and countable in German and that du hast Hose is therefore incorrect", then yes, that is unfortunately true.

        As for singular you or plural you -- both are accepted, as long as the subject and the verb match each other, of course. (So du habt or ihr hast would not be accepted, nor would something involving a nonexistent verb form such as du habst.)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spence959930

        What's wrong with Du hast Hosen


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        What's wrong with Du hast Hosen

        Nothing.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelindaGib3

        You have trousers.

        This excersise did not accept the singular "Du hast Hose." Which is how the English sentence is worded. While I admit that this English sentence could mean both "You have A pair of trousers.", and "You have SEVERAL pairs of trousers." This does not means my translation should be marked wrong.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        This excersise did not accept the singular "Du hast Hose."

        That's not the correct singular, which would be Du hast eine Hose. with an article before the noun.

        Just as you cannot say "I have shirt" or "I have sock" -- it has to be "I have a shirt, I have a sock".

        English "you have pants / you have trousers" has no article because "pants" and "trousers" are plural, and English doesn't need an indefinite article before plural nouns the way it does before countable singular nouns.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaVandi2

        As mentioned already many, many times in this discussion : you have to use the article before Hose. So " Du hast EINE Hose" is correct.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilsav.R.

        This could be both 'Du hast Hose' & 'Ihr habt Hosen'. Why aren't both correct?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        This could be [...] 'Du hast Hose'

        No. That makes no sense in German. Please read all of the existing comments first.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pudding999899

        Why is " Du hast Hose" incorrect please?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

        Did you read all comments before you asked your question? It's already answered.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmkfrommn

        What's wrong with "Du hast Hose"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Please read all of the other comments on this sentence discussion -- that question has been asked and answered before.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nghiabuidinh2210

        Write my answer "Du hast Hose" and it's wrong. Can someone explain to me why?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Write my answer "Du hast Hose" and it's wrong. Can someone explain to me why?

        There are already several explanations on this comment page.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveHawley

        My answer should be accepted


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Nobody can see your answer, so references to "my answer" or "this" or "what I wrote" are not helpful.

        What was your entire answer?

        (And if it was Du hast Hose - that's wrong in German, for reasons already explained on this page.)

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