"Hun ouders vinden het prima."

Translation:Their parents think it is fine.

1 year ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GekPapaAl

Isn't "prima" more than just fine?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
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No.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beloeng
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Interesting and good to know. In other languages it tends to be more.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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I typed 'Their parents think it fine' and was marked wrong. I suggested that it should have been marked right, since the way I expressed it is fairly common where I am (South Africa) and I would guess that our usage derives from general British English usage. Would anyone like to offer their thoughts on this?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
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You missed a verb, which is why it was marked wrong: "Their parents think it is fine".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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Yes, thanks Merrie, I did realise that. However, what I'm saying is that commonly in English we would omit the 'is'. This sort of thing happens in the vernacular very often. For example, in Canada, a francophone will usually say 'Je sais pas' omitting the grammatically necessary 'ne' before 'sais'. That is the sort of thing that I am referring to here. I realised why I got it wrong, but I'm saying that because 'Their parents think it fine' is common usage (but not slang), it should be accepted as correct. I hope you follow my reasoning here. Thank you for responding.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
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Hi GlenM,

I don't think that the fact that something is commonly used automatically makes it correct. Especially when doing exercises like this one, given the fact that one should aim at sentences that are gramatically correct (when speaking spontaneously, it's different, at least at the beginning the focus shouldn't be on accuracy, but on fluency).

If you think about this sentence in particular, and try to replace 'fine' with any other adjective ('yellow', for instance), you'll see that the resulting sentence is odd.

Now, that being said, it is true that one could use a verbless clause in that context (and that's how I'd analyse the sentence you propose). For example, Bas Aarts, in English Syntax and Argumentation says that:

" We need to add to the list of non-finite clauses a fifth type which is rather special in that it does not contain a verb. Here are some example sentences:

(16) Martin considers [Seb a creep].

(17) Phil deems [Henry foolish].

The bracketed clauses have been called verbless clauses, but a more recent term (...) is Small Clause. Small Clauses are clauses that lack an overt verb, but can be said to contain an implicit verb be." (Chapter 4: 'More on Form: Clauses and Sentences', pp. 52 & 53).

What I am not sure about is whether think can behave in the same way as consider and deem and introduce a verbless clause. But it seems plausible, to say the least. Have you searched on the internet? (The N-gram viewer might be useful).

Hope this helps, cheers!

1 month ago
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